Minute hand stops

MelodyEgg

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Aug 7, 2022
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6F34C832-A9C8-486F-8BC1-7E822EDC28D3.jpeg 5B31C638-62C5-40BC-832E-E749B3D8CCAC.jpeg 1EA493DC-65B6-4F9F-9B10-373A8D6965A9.jpeg 1EA493DC-65B6-4F9F-9B10-373A8D6965A9.jpeg AE5222FE-FFB2-4321-950D-8E8B9E93E52D.jpeg 06B23E49-5EEA-4DE6-800B-4D97D197EA99.jpeg This pin is stopping the minute hand from getting to the top of the hour.
Function is perfect through the 1/4, 1/2, and 3/4 chimes, but this 4th pin stops the movement from completing the hour with the chimes and hammer strikes at the top of every hour. I can manually push the minute hand beyond this “paddle” and the chimes and hour strikes will perform.
What can I adjust to make this movement complete the hourly cycle?
 

wow

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I think that is the chime correction stop lever. It should be in that position at 3/4 hour position. Then at the hour position the lift cam raises higher than at the other 1/4 positions an lifts the lever above the pin allowing the chimes to advance. The cam at the top right may need to be re-positioned to allow that to happen.
 

disciple_dan

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That movement is extremely dirty. It is probably a power loss problem when doing that heavy lifting at the hour strike. Danny
 

MelodyEgg

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That movement is extremely dirty. It is probably a power loss problem when doing that heavy lifting at the hour strike. Danny
From which train would this be losing power from?
The chimes (right weight), the minute/hour (center), or the strike train?
Thanks,
MEgg
 

Dick Feldman

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Sep 1, 2000
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From which train would this be losing power from?
The chimes (right weight), the minute/hour (center), or the strike train?
Thanks,
MEgg
That clock movement is a machine and will wear (has worn) just as any other machine. About 60 years at this tells me the loss of power likely is due to wear/friction throughout the movement. Someone (maybe you), in the past has tried to solve the wear by over lubricating the movement with a wrong product. (WD-40?). A bad approach because clean, oil and adjust are poor (or non) solutions for wear/friction/power.
As a solution, I would suggest you study clock repair. Your local library has plenty of books on clock repair. Do not depend on UTube or Facebook as most of those bits are put out by people with much less experience than you have.
If you like the clock, learn how to repair it properly.
JMHO
Dick
 
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R. Croswell

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Apr 4, 2006
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From which train would this be losing power from?
The chimes (right weight), the minute/hour (center), or the strike train?
Thanks,
MEgg
The time (going) train supplies the power to move the levers that initiate the chime and strike functions. Dick is quite correct in saying that a clock movement is a machine and will wear (has worn) just as any other machine. and that the loss of power likely is due to wear/friction throughout the movement, but wear is just one thing that can cause friction and power loss. Accumulated dirt and dried up sticky oil can stop a clock just as quick as wear. Then there is always the possibility that a single part is broken or damaged (or has been messed with) that is the immediate cause of the failure. Clocks start to wear on day one and some parts wear faster than others. Just how much wear can be tolerated before it causes a problem is often unclear. Any older clock that is as dirty as this one and is experiencing what may be a power loss due to friction is likely seeing friction caused by wear and accumulated dirt.

One thing that is clear, is that this clock movement really needs a bath - taken completely apart and properly cleaned. After it has been cleaned you will be able to better assess the degree of wear, and perhaps even discover that someone has already installed bushings where excessive wear was present. I would stress that this is a complicated movement and not well suited as a beginner clock job.

Dick said, "Do not depend on UTube or Facebook as most of those bits are put out by people with much less experience than you have.
If you like the clock, learn how to repair it properly
". I totally agree.

RC
 

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