mini lathe

tin-injun

Registered User
Nov 10, 2002
131
0
16
Hi Everyone,Thought I would share this with you all, I just bought a neat little lathe from a local Amish man(Ray Hostetler),he is making these along with a mini mill and a few other tools for the hobby oriented.Never ceases to amaze me the creativity of people out there.His original intentions for making this was for model makers to make parts for their small projects.I thought I would give it a try for polishing pivots etc..I have used it a few times and seems to work well for what I need it for,I do have a larger 7x12 Central Machinery lathe but like this one for the small 2" chuck(I think it would grip a human hair) and open work space.To give you an idea of the size the board it is mounted on is 24"x 8" and weighs about 24 pounds. It has a 1/5 horse motor that is variable speed from 0 to roughly 2200 rpm and came just as pictured for under $350.Check out the pics and if have any questions or specific measurements I will try to answer them for you.Ive added one picture and links for a couple more,thanks. Kent

http://www.ken.advertisnet.com/lathe2.jpg

http://www.ken.advertisnet.com/lathe3.jpg
 

tin-injun

Registered User
Nov 10, 2002
131
0
16
Hi Everyone,Thought I would share this with you all, I just bought a neat little lathe from a local Amish man(Ray Hostetler),he is making these along with a mini mill and a few other tools for the hobby oriented.Never ceases to amaze me the creativity of people out there.His original intentions for making this was for model makers to make parts for their small projects.I thought I would give it a try for polishing pivots etc..I have used it a few times and seems to work well for what I need it for,I do have a larger 7x12 Central Machinery lathe but like this one for the small 2" chuck(I think it would grip a human hair) and open work space.To give you an idea of the size the board it is mounted on is 24"x 8" and weighs about 24 pounds. It has a 1/5 horse motor that is variable speed from 0 to roughly 2200 rpm and came just as pictured for under $350.Check out the pics and if have any questions or specific measurements I will try to answer them for you.Ive added one picture and links for a couple more,thanks. Kent

http://www.ken.advertisnet.com/lathe2.jpg

http://www.ken.advertisnet.com/lathe3.jpg
 
M

mrb

awfully ugly! have you tried anything yet that requires some tolerance such as repivoting? it seems a lot better than a taig. the price sure makes it an option for a hobbyist.
 

tin-injun

Registered User
Nov 10, 2002
131
0
16
Hi MRB,I have a 1/4" chuck on the way,but have not tried to repivot with it yet.I did straighten a few french clock arbors with it(the ones I am going to repivot),shortened a winding arbor and a hand arbor, and I felt comfortable enough to use the lathe to dress & polish the pivots on my Ball Seth Thomas #2,lathe seems to work fine.I know it's not the prettiest lathe out there,and I agree it would look nicer anodized or powder coated but function and price is the goal.I think it beats the price of some pivot polishers on the market that have only one purpose.Will update how it repivots when I get it set up.If you would like to know more give Ray a call, he is the designer/builder and will be able to answer any questions better than I could.I just thought I would share it with you all,I think it's a good setup for the budget/hobby guys that don't make a living doing clock repair.

417-733-2068 or drop a line to:
Ray Hostetler
127 State Rd. EE
Buffalo,Mo.65622

Tin
 

Greg Crockett

Registered User
Apr 13, 2001
464
0
0
Hi Tin-Injun,

Is it possible to use ww collets in your new lathe? What sort of bearings are in the headstock?

Best regards,
Greg
 

tin-injun

Registered User
Nov 10, 2002
131
0
16
Hi Greg,Sorry it took so long to get back to you.I don't have it setup yet to do everything that I want to try with it,but it seems to be a little better quality than any of the China built small lathes out there(I have a central machinery).The headstock bearings are a good quality deep groove bearing used for industrial electric motors and are a common replaceable size,the spindle size is m12-1(metric) which I believe is the standard Unimat size,tailstock is a mt-1, 3/16 tool bits,any standard accessories will adapt if you know the sizes.Grizzly Industries has alot of tooling that can be used on it, http://www.grizzly.com/ they have a nice catalog as well.The only thing I don't like about it is the chuck(India made),which was purchased and not made by Ray.I talked to him about it today and he can build it with a different chuck if you wish,keep in mind he did make this unit of mine for hobby use but believe with a few changes will work well. I will be looking for a more precision chuck(probably a 4 jaw) with a one key design,and I bought a nice 1/4 inch tailstock chuck with the mt-1 built into it,and will try re-pivoting when I get it set up.If you use the ww collets,you will at least need to get a collet adapter(or possibly a ww watchmaker lathe chuck could be adapted or a new one ordered with the m12-1 spindle thread) I am not sure what size the drawbars are for the ww's are but this lathe only has a 3/16 hole through the spindle.I mentioned this to Ray and he didn't act like it was a big deal to change the spindle size.I have had a few questions asked about the mill that he makes,it is a little different deal than the lathes as it comes CNC compatible.He said he would make a manual version if enough interest was there,he has sold out of the mills but is working on another run of them,I will get some pics as soon as he gets them ready.If you have any questions,feel free to give Ray a call he is the one you actually need to talk with about the changes you would like to add.Thanks for the interest, Tin
 

Cathy in Hawaii

Registered User
Feb 25, 2005
362
2
0
Moku Nui, Hawaii
Aloha Kent,

I think "beauty" is in the eye of the beholder. That looks like a perfect example of "form follows function". How accurate is it and does it work well? If the answer to both of those is "yes" then it is beautiful. It looks quite durable. It looks like it could also be foot treadle driven as well as with the electric motor.

Amish folks generally do good work, they just don't add embellishments to it. The Shakers had some really gorgeous items because they had it all pared down to perfect "function" and the form had it's own spare elegance.

A hui hou,
Cathy
 

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