metal winding arbor slips inside wooden gear when winding

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by Mark F. Tooze, Jul 17, 2012.

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  1. Mark F. Tooze

    Mark F. Tooze Registered User

    Feb 5, 2007
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    I am looking for tips on how to tighten up the hole in the gear so that the winding arbor does not slip inside the gear. This is my first wooden works clock and it is pretty battered. I'd like to fix the gear/arbor situation first then move on. This is on the time side; strike side seems not to have the problem. Thank you,
     
  2. Jmeechie

    Jmeechie Registered User
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    Dec 8, 2010
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    Hello Mark,

    I have work on several of these clocks and there were several ways they secured the metal arbor to the wood that I have seen. If the barrel is not too badly damaged (cracked) check the other winding Barrel and see if it was pinned through the barrel to the arbor and if so check the loose one and re pin accordingly. If it was a press fit and is now loose you can use a glue (wood or epoxy) to secure. You will need to try and gently press out the arbor so you can clean the two holes and apply the glue to the inside of one hole and press back together. Make sure you mark the position on the arbor where the barrel is so you get it lined back up.

    I know there will be some people out there that will disagree with me on the glue repair but honestly your only other choice is to replace the barrel with a good used or new one! This is why I am saying to look at both barrel assemblies and see how they were originally made! Good luck.

    Cheers,
    James
     
  3. Mark F. Tooze

    Mark F. Tooze Registered User

    Feb 5, 2007
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    Thanks James,

    Both arbor to barrel on time and strike side are press fit. Strike side is not slipping so I'm inclined to leave well enough alone. I'm assuming that I can clean the hole with mineral spirits. From what I can tell, good used barrels are pretty expensive so I'll try the epoxy method. T


    Thanks again for your response. I was away for several days and just got back to the forum.
     
  4. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Apr 6, 2004
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    I've never been faced with this specific challenge but do understand it. Go ahead with your epoxy trial but I regard epoxy much more as a filler than a glue. It'll probably work great but if not, my choice would be a cyanoacrylite or super gloo. I prefer KRAZY brand liquid form. G'luck matey!
     
  5. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
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    Well I to have never had to do this repair, but if the “glue” doesn’t hold, you might try removing the wheel and the arbor from the spool and route out a slot in the back side of the spool and drill a hole through the arbor and insert a steel pin. Put the arbor back so the pin is in the slot you made in the spool. A little epoxy around the pin in the slot should hold it all together. When you put the wheel back it will be invisible.

    RC
     
  6. mbegalla

    mbegalla Registered User

    Nov 23, 2008
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    i have corrected this problem easily by just drilling a small hole through the wooden drum and steel arbor and pinning it together
     

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