MCD tooling in watchmaking?

Discussion in 'Horological Tools' started by karlmansson, Sep 26, 2019.

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  1. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

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    #1 karlmansson, Sep 26, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2019
    Hello!

    A while back I acquired an Aciera F1 that came with a batch of tooling. I only ever saw pictures of the tooling but I saw at least one boring head and a couple of fly cutters in there. Turns out they were all for holding monocrystalline diamond tooling.

    The markings on the tools are “Meyco” (still in business and it looks like I have what is is listed in their catalogue as “MCD milling tools for the optics industry”) and Voegeli & Wirz, a company that I can today only find as a diamond refining company.

    I was hoping that the tools would be standard either carbide or HSS holding tooling but no dice. They will only hold the diamond inserts. I’m trying to work out if they would be useful to me at all or if they are too specialized. I shudder at the thought of using diamond for the interrupted cuts that is inherent to milling. Terribly brittle stuff.

    From what I’ve been able to read the tools leave a spectacular finish if used correctly but how a diamond crystal would survive the travel around on the 7cm radius fly cutter with any type of depth of cut is beyond me.

    What do you think? Is this tooling useful for watchmaking and restoration work?

    Regards
    Karl

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  2. praezis

    praezis Registered User

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    At least you can use them on brass, gold etc. only, never steel!

    Frank
     
  3. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

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    Thanks Frank!

    Yes, I read that they were for "nonferrous metals". Is that because of the carbon content or because MCD isn't well suited for machining harder materials?

    You wouldn't happen to know where I might find info on speeds and feeds for this type of tooling?

    Regards
    Karl
     
  4. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

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    Never mind, I found the info from the manufacturer! Probably where I should have looked first…

    Does anyone have any experience using these Tools and might help me with avoiding some pitfalls or provide some pointers?

    Regards
    Karl
     
  5. praezis

    praezis Registered User

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    As I understand, they are for decorative work, applying the last polished finish, not for heavy cutting.
    I have a diamont cutter from India (they are cheap and come in various shapes), but use it very rarely on my lathe.
    Frank
     
  6. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

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    One might think that they would be for cutting very hard materials, seeing as it’s the worlds hardest material. But seeing as it’s not to be used for steels I’m thinking that there would be possible uses for machining glass or other optical materials?
    The tools I have are listed as “flycutting tools for the optics industry”. I can’t really see how that would be useful to me though. Leaning towards selling this lot...

    Regards
    Karl
     
  7. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

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    I thought they were used in the jewellery industry to impart mirror finishes and also patterns alike to guilloches. Also diamond tools were (are?) used in turning hard contact lenses.

    Diamonds are brittle, but only along certain axes of their crystal structure (this is the art of cleaving diamonds), but not oblique to them. I gather it is a question how the cutting faces are oriented with respect to the crystal structure.

    Years ago I picked up cheaply a set of diamond lathe cutting tools, but never used them. The kind of tool you reserve for that 'special' job, that may never come along.
     

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