• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Maybe a Whiting Clock

Pat L.

NAWCC Member
Jul 28, 2003
70
13
8
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This one was found in the garage of an estate sale last Thursday. The first two pictures show how it was found and the last two pictures show it roughly assembled.

All of the parts are there including the weights, counter-weights, pendulum and rod. Part of the hour hand is missing and the minute hand is bent. The dial is faded, but I think the signature is "R. Whiting Winchester" and the movement & hands also looks like Whiting style. The gear trains seem to work with a little finger pressure on the gears.

It's probably my oldest clock.

Whiting_1.jpg Whiting_2.jpg Whiting 3.JPG Whiting 4.jpg
 

jmclaugh

Registered User
Jun 1, 2006
5,233
224
63
Devon
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Region
An interesting longcase which seems indeed tall. The case is almost like an earlier longcase yet dates I think to the early 1800s and a painted dial. Anyway it deserves rescuing especially at that price.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
5,660
1,060
113
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This one was found in the garage of an estate sale last Thursday. The first two pictures show how it was found and the last two pictures show it roughly assembled.

All of the parts are there including the weights, counter-weights, pendulum and rod. Part of the hour hand is missing and the minute hand is bent. The dial is faded, but I think the signature is "R. Whiting Winchester" and the movement & hands also looks like Whiting style. The gear trains seem to work with a little finger pressure on the gears.

It's probably my oldest clock.

View attachment 608171 View attachment 608172 View attachment 608173 View attachment 608174
Not so shabby!

Is the case grain painted? If so, a big plus.

Yes, it does look like Whiting on the dial.

A full frontal pic of the dial would help.

Also, looking at the dial under a UV light may help, too.

A steal for $40! Congrats!

Uhralt
Where did he mention that?

RM
 

brian fisher

NAWCC Member
Jan 20, 2017
1,720
427
83
houston, tx
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its sharpied on the box in the second pic.

this one seems like a very utilitarian model. I really dig it. my guess is that it is also from the early 1800's. can't wait to see what Jim DuBois has to say about this one.
 

Pat L.

NAWCC Member
Jul 28, 2003
70
13
8
Country
Region
An interesting longcase which seems indeed tall. The case is almost like an earlier longcase yet dates I think to the early 1800s and a painted dial. Anyway it deserves rescuing especially at that price.
Sorry, I neglected to mention the height of the case which is 89". The front door has a very nice, and still functioning, spring-return door latch. Another interesting thing is that the pendulum bob apparently struck the inside walls of the case while swinging, as a rectangular section of the case has been removed, made much thinner, and then replaced. The pendulum hasn't been hung yet, but the repair seems to be at the right position to line-up with the pendulum bob. I wonder if that resulted in a warranty claim against the cabinet-maker, or if the owner just repaired it himself. Pictures are attached.

Whiting_10.jpg Whiting_8.jpg Whiting_9.jpg
 

Pat L.

NAWCC Member
Jul 28, 2003
70
13
8
Country
Region
Not so shabby!

Is the case grain painted? If so, a big plus.

Yes, it does look like Whiting on the dial.

A full frontal pic of the dial would help.

Also, looking at the dial under a UV light may help, too.

RM
I don't think the case is grain painted, although I'm not very knowledgable about that. It just looks like old varnish to me. Attached are some pictures of the dial and movement. I tried to look at the dial with a uv light, but it didn't help. Maybe I'll try again tonight when it starts getting dark.

Thanks to all who took the time to look at this posting, and those who made comments about it.

Whiting_11.jpg Whiting_12.jpg Whiting_13.jpg Whiting_14.jpg Whiting_15.jpg Whiting_16.jpg Whiting_17.jpg Whiting_18.jpg
 

oldcat61

NAWCC Member
Dec 12, 2008
159
8
18
South Jersey
What's with the plugged holes on the dial? Kind of strange place. Certainly not an expert on painted dials. Someone here will help figure it out.
 

Jim DuBois

Gibbs Literary Award
NAWCC Member
Sponsor
Jun 14, 2008
3,217
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Magnolia, TX
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Faux painted "winding arbor holes" are quite common on woodworks clock dials. At least 1/2 of them in this display have the painted false winding arbors.

20190802_085919.jpg
 
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rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
5,660
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Just to throw in an obscure factoid, there were some American ww shelf clocks that had pull-up wind movements where faux winding holes were painted on the dial.

For example, F & E Sanfords of Goshen, CT made such clocks which utilized Torrington 4 arbor ww pull-up wind movements. Like your ww tall case clock movement, the escapement was between the plates.

See Lanzo and Brown, "Norris North and His ContemporaryTorrington Clock Makers", pages 10, 15-18 and the figures therein.

RM.
 
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