20th c Mauthe mantel clock questions

photon

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Sep 24, 2022
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Hello, I'm new to the site so please excuse me if I've posted this in the wrong area.
I acquired a Mauthe mantel clock yesterday and have some questions.
The case is about 16-3/4 inches long and 8 inches high and is in very good condition with a high gloss finish.
It appears to have a three train movement but I'm not familiar with it's appearance. There are three winding holes on the case front. Are the three trains quarter, half and hour chimes or some other combination?
The knob labelled '1' with an arrow appears to silence the clock's chimes altogether. Does it serve any other purpose. Also, it appears to require very little trueing to activate it, is that normal?
I don't know what the lever labelled '2' with an arrow is for. Can anyone identify it's purpose for me please?
I did find some information about the company's history online but little else so any other information, comments or suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks to all in advance.

Mauthe mantel clock case.jpg .jpg Mauthe mantel clock questions.jpg
 

KurtinSA

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Nov 24, 2014
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Welcome to the message board! The clock dates towards the end of the production by Mauthe as given by the logo on the back plate and this post:


I can't say much about #2 other than it might serve to dampen the chime rods? What happens when you move #2? And the three trains are time, strike (at the hour and 1/2 hour typically), and chime (where it plays a short set of notes, typically on the quarter hours).

Kurt
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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There are three winding holes on the case front. Are the three trains quarter, half and hour chimes or some other combination?
The three winding holes are for the time, the strike and the chime. The centre hole is the time, as Kurt said.

The knob labelled '1' with an arrow appears to silence the clock's chimes altogether. Does it serve any other purpose.
Yes, it silences the strike and chime when you don't want them, that's all.

Also, it appears to require very little trueing to activate it, is that normal?
I don't understand what you mean. What requires 'very little trueing'? If you mean the clock itself, since it has a floating balance and not a pendulum, it will run even it is standing on a surface that is not horizontal.

But perhaps you meant something else?

As fpr the lever you have marked 2, since we can't really see much of it, it's hard to be certain, but it may be to hold the gong rods steady when the clock is in transit.

The clock is relatively modern, perhaps from the 1960s. Mauthe went out of business in 1975.

JTD
 

JimmyOz

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Feb 21, 2008
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One of the hammers is sitting high, does the chime sound right? I would think when the clock goes in to warning it falls. do you hear one ding about 5 minutes before the chime goes off?
 

photon

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The clock is relatively modern, perhaps from the 1960s. Mauthe went out of business in 1975.

JTD
I thought I understood from something I read elsewhere that they stopped making clocks in the 1950s and continued with watches until 1975/1976. I too thought it looked more modern than the '50s.
 

photon

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As fpr the lever you have marked 2, since we can't really see much of it, it's hard to be certain, but it may be to hold the gong rods steady when the clock is in transit.

JTD
I think you're right about holding the rods in place in transit. I look closer and you can see in the attached photos there appears to be a 'rake' that would clamp the rods in place when the mechanism is rotated (arrows). It doesn't move and is likely seized. The other two photos show the 'bottom and top 'rakes'.

Mauthe rod clamp.jpg Mauthe -rake 1.jpg Mauthe -rake 2.jpg
 

photon

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One of the hammers is sitting high, does the chime sound right? I would think when the clock goes in to warning it falls. do you hear one ding about 5 minutes before the chime goes off?
The hammer is high as it was striking as I took the picture.

However, the Westminster chime is missing a note. The second hammer (from the front of the case) although lifting properly when required, doesn't seem to fall far enough to strike the rod. I'm not sure where to start to think about correcting that.
 

J. A. Olson

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Dec 21, 2006
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The 'rakes' hold the gong rods so they don't clatter about and snap off when the clock is in shipment.
Sometimes this seizes up with enough dust or corrosion which renders it impossible to use.

The hammers are made of soft brass which can handle slight adjustments. You might have to adjust the hammer stem or its resting tail
to get satisfactory results. It should sound like this when chiming:



Clock was made in late 1950's or perhaps 1960's going by the Hettich balance wheel escapement and case style, sometimes known as 'Mid Century'. Older examples of the Mauthe W500 had pendulums. Typical household clock and while not extravagant or rare, it is a nice clock and should be a reliable runner. In their final years, Mauthe used rebranded Hermle 340 series balance wheel escapement movements which spelled the final phase of Mauthe clock production.
 

photon

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The hammers are made of soft brass which can handle slight adjustments. You might have to adjust the hammer stem or its resting tail
to get satisfactory results. It should sound like this when chiming:
Thanks for the details and video. I'm not very conversant with correct terminology so I'm not sure what is meant by 'the hammer stem' and 'resting tail. Can you help me please?

Also I noticed S and F stamped on either side of the balance wheel but don't see where to actually do the adjustment to keep better time. Again, any help would be appreciated.
 

J. A. Olson

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Dec 21, 2006
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Small adjustments are the way to go with both hammers and balance wheel.
In the attachment is a short guide from the NAWCC showing how to adjust a typical Hermle/Hettich floating balance wheel.
Your Mauthe's balance wheel should work on the same principals:

Hermle Balance.png

Regarding the hammer stem and tail rest positioning, another photo showing where these are located:

mauthe hammers.jpg
 

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