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Mauthe clock winding time spring barrel question

wcr-63

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Jan 17, 2009
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I have a mauthe floating balance escapement. The "time, spring barrel"that has a star shaped gear offset on the bottom side of the barrel opposite the side with the locking click mechanism with a star gear on the spring barrel itself. My question is , is this just an extra safety lock in case the click does not lock, and is it necessary?, as it seems to be causing the clock to stop as it seems to bind with barrel spring?? I can attach a pict. if needed. Thanks and any advice will be greatly appreciated

Picture spring barrel.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

The Tick Doc

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IT looks to me to be a stop lock gear, this would stop the winding of the spring just befor it is wound all the way and also stop the unwinding just befor the spring is compleatly wound down. If not set corectly it will not wind all the way up or stop the clock befor it is wound down , say only 2 days.................TTD
 

wcr-63

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Jan 17, 2009
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Thanks for the info., What if I don't reinstall it at all, will the time still work??
 

R&A

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Oct 21, 2008
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Yes the time will still work. It's called a Geneva stop. The stop also helps to stop the movement from being damage if the spring brakes. Sometime they can be a pain in the butt to get placed in the proper position.

H/C
 

dAz57

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Dec 7, 2011
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no it won't protect anything if the spring breaks, not sure where you got that idea from, all the stop work is meant to do is to utilise the best part of the spring for power, it prevents the being fully wound up so both relieves the stress on the mainspring end from tearing and to stop the excessive power from a tightly wound spring which normally takes about a turn to level the power out.

I usually set these up by winding the spring up fully, then back of a turn, set the star so it locks the winding if you try to wind it up further.
 

shutterbug

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The stops have been removed from hundreds of clocks and they work fine, but the stops are there for a reason. They prevent over winding, which could break a spring, but they also keep the spring from being wound further than designed for best time keeping. They aren't hard to set (the kind you have anyway) so I'd recommend putting them back it. Set it so the long tooth encounters the short notch about one and a half to two full turns from fully wound.
 

R&A

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Oct 21, 2008
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I guess you know better than I. I was told by an old timer. I guess he was a liar.

H/C
 

harold bain

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I guess you know better than I. I was told by an old timer. I guess he was a liar.

H/C
H/C, having a mistaken belief doesn't make a person a liar, and I don't think anyone here was calling anyone a liar.
I think, though, that a good case could be made for geneva stops saving damage in loop end spring movements, as the power of the spring is arrested before it transfers to the wind arbor with the mainwheel attached.
But I don't think that would apply to our original poster's movement. However, the stops should remain on the clock, and if WCR wants to be a good clock repairman, he should learn how they work, so he can properly set them.

I don't recall ever having to replace a broken spring on a movement with stopworks, but they don't represent a very large percentage of the clocks that I have serviced.
 

dAz57

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I guess you know better than I. I was told by an old timer. I guess he was a liar.

H/C
well have a think about, on the barrel of the OP clock, the stop work only moves when the clock is wound or running down, if the spring breaks and the barrel arbour does spin around it is still going to stop on the stopwork and transfer the shock to the barrel, or if the spring break in the middle then all the shock will go straight to the barrel.

I agree with what Harold said, not calling anybody a liar, just mistaken beliefs.

it might work on an open loop mainspring, but on the last ST wall clock I did the stopwork was missing, so.....:p
 

shutterbug

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I think the stop works would certainly help minimize the damage from a runaway spring when the click fails. It wouldn't help much with a broken spring though.
 

wcr-63

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Jan 17, 2009
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Thanks everyone for your input, I am going to try to get the stop working properly
 

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