Marine-Quarz Chronometer

Discussion in 'Chronometers' started by Leigh Callaway, Jan 12, 2019.

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  1. Leigh Callaway

    Leigh Callaway Registered User
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    Sep 5, 2011
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    Upper Valley, New Hampshire
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    Wempe type 904 Marine-Quarz chronometer. Movement has no timekeeping function of its own. It’s a set of two fixed coils getting half second impulses from a quartz oscillator in the bottom of the case. These cause an armature to rock which drives an index wheel, which in turn drives the movement. Runs on four D cell batteries. Case holds eight so the movement stays running when changed four at a time.
    According to recent email from a Division Manager at Wempe “The chronometer no. 13181 was manufactured in the year 1976 and passed the large test according to German DHI guideline and was approved to transatlantic shipping. The chronometer was sold on July 19, 1976 to ‘Baltona’ which can be the still existing company Baltona Shipchandlers Ltd from Poland."
    This model is described in Jonathan Betts’ “Marine Chronometers at Greenwich” on page 677.
    The rate of this one in two months is essentially zero.
    (Photos by permission of seller)

    01 Wempe 01 - Copy.jpg 02 Wempe 904 SN 13181.jpg 03 Wempe quartz marine clock (08).jpg 04 Wempe 05.jpg 05 Cert Birth.jpg
     
  2. Paul Regan

    Paul Regan Registered User

    Mar 4, 2003
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    Thanks for posting Leigh. It is interesting that the chronometer did not change its outer appearance for over 175 years. It still had a box whether it contained a movement or batteries.
    Paul
     
  3. Leigh Callaway

    Leigh Callaway Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 5, 2011
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    Upper Valley, New Hampshire
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    #3 Leigh Callaway, Feb 1, 2020
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2020
    This was hacked today with NIST/www.time.gov. It is one second fast. It has not swung fast or slow. Its rate has been plus one second in 427 days.

    This is not the pinnacle of mechanical precision starting with Preston, then passed around for jewelling, mainspring, balance, escapement, detent, gimballing, finishing, fusee chain, balance spring, engraving, fitting hands, mounting in a box and final adjustment for possible trial.

    And it may be the slippery slope to the GPS synchronized wristwatch.

    But still. No winding. No external ("atomic watch") synchronization.

    Just.one.second.
     

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