Manufactured expressly for Thomas C. Garrett, Philadelphia

Discussion in 'European & Other Pocket Watches' started by jboger, Jan 3, 2020.

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  1. jboger

    jboger Registered User

    Jan 7, 2019
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    Rustled up yet another one. I think people might like this one as seems rather high end. The dial is signed "Thomas C. Garrett / Philadelphia". And the cap is engraved "Manufactured Expressly for Thomas C. Garrett / Philadelphia". When one removes the cap, a different name appears engraved on the plates: H. R. Lemon in script, along with the address 27 Hanover St, Liverpool. The serial number is 13322. The plates are screwed together, not pinned, and the hands appear to be original. Runs with strong motion to the balance, which is split. Well, I imagine the case was regrettably scrapped long ago. Too bad. Nice watch.

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    pmwas, Keith R... and viclip like this.
  2. Keith R...

    Keith R... Registered User
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    Nice!

    Looks like a Howard hour hand (1858).

    Keith R...
     
  3. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    I suspect this is the Thomas C Garrett ...

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    From 1839 trade directory - I believe the single 't' to be a typo. I don't other directories and so I cannot provide the years he was active, but Henry Reynolds Lemon active from 1850's which i believe is right for the movement.

    John
     
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  4. jboger

    jboger Registered User

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    Whilst thinking (something I occasionally do), I had a thought. I have seen many, many Anglo-American fusees but none post the American Civil War. I have a movement--just the movement, no case--that I think dates well after the US Civil War. It was sold by a Baltimore dealer. I have not illustrated this one. But I believe that is the only one I might have. My observation, limited to just myself, leads me to think that English imports must have dropped off precipitously during the late 1860s. Yes, I realize Waltham was already on line, and if memory serves me well, Elgin started about 1868, with other major manufacturers fast on their heels. Still, England had been the supplier for many generations. It does not seem possible that the US market withered so quickly, that custom alone would have perpetuated the purchase of an English watch. Tennis, anyone?
     
  5. jboger

    jboger Registered User

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    Forgive the tennis remark. It popped into my head and I could not let it go.
     
  6. jboger

    jboger Registered User

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  7. Dr. Jon

    Dr. Jon Registered User
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    English imports ran well into the 1880's but only or top end watches, complicated, detent pocket chronometers and very fine levers but the low and mid market was gone by the middle of the US Civil war. Waltham and Elgin ate the middle and low end. What market share the US makers didn't take, the Swiss did.

    Very fine presentation watches were usually English, as were navigation watches, often fine levers.

    Also by the end of the US Civil War key wind watches were becoming a tough sell and a keyless fusee is a complicated and expensive item, which is also expensive to maintain.

    By teh 1880's and 90's the English were making many going barrel watches but it was far too little and far too late.
     
  8. jess tauber

    jess tauber Registered User

    Dec 24, 2017
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    During the US Civil War, the British continued to trade with the Confederacy, despite an attempted embargo by the remnant Union meant to drive them into economic submission. I wonder how much of a role knowledge of this seeming betrayal may have had on the replacement of British watch imports by US manufactures. I suppose one could examine WHICH states these movements went to during and after the War years.

    Jess Tauber
     
  9. jboger

    jboger Registered User

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    Interesting posts.

    Jess: I suspect what you suggest was not much of a factor, though it is an interesting idea. And I also suspect that one would not see more British imports in Southern states during and/or after the war (than before) because the number of imports would reflect population density, or more precisely a white population density sufficiently affluent enough to purchase an imported watch. Those people before, during, and after the American Civil War were located in the North as the South was primarily agrarian.

    I think Dr. Jon is on the right track. People here voted with their pocketbooks. Imported British fusees were: (1) expensive; (2) required a chain, and I doubt there was much domestic production of this part if/when it broke; and (3) couldn't compete with domestic production of cheaper, non-fusee key- and pendant-wind watches, which was on the rise.

    But the fusee continued to be made and sold in the UK up until at least 1910, as someone commented in another thread. I can understand that. In my own lifetime, when growing up, a telephone was black and a refrigerator was white. One didn't think much about these things. Perhaps for many Brits prior to WWI a watch simply wasn't a watch unless it was a fusee.

    All speculation, I admit.
     
  10. jess tauber

    jess tauber Registered User

    Dec 24, 2017
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    Since watch manufacture during the Civil War was primarily in industrialized Northern states, there could be some resentment also on the part of potential purchasers, including after the war was over. Though most of the wealthy landowners in the South would have found themselves in difficulties once their slaves were freed.

    Jess Tauber
     

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