Mangled Screw in Top Block

Discussion in '400-Day & Atmos' started by KurtinSA, Sep 19, 2019.

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  1. KurtinSA

    KurtinSA Registered User
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    Next up for me is a Haller clock. As I begin to take the clock down, I noticed that the spring was broken at the top block and the block is still in the saddle. Further, the screw that holds the top block in place is severely mangled. On the one side, the slot is still visible but barely. On the opposite side, it looks like that end was effectively peened and will be difficult to turn out. I've tried only a little bit to work on the slotted side, but it's really not wanting to turn.

    Does anyone have suggestions? I thought about using the alum approach, but I wonder about any other steel in the upper saddle? The top block appears to be brass, but I'm sure there are two steel screws holding it together. What is the makeup of the fixture that holds the upper saddle onto the bracket...any steel there? If I were to dunk the whole thing in an alum solution, how much will I destroy doing that?

    Thanks...Kurt

    HallerSaddle1.jpg HallerSaddle2.jpg
     
  2. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    Kurt,of cause the alumn will eatr up every steel part , e.g. the block skrews.I cannot see it from Your pics but in some clocks the saddle is fixed in the bracket with a dished steel washer ,if yes,this will also be destroyed.
    I´d try the following: take out bracket with saddle and soak the skrew with Balistol or any other "contact oil spray" overnight . Grind/file off the deformed tip end of the skrew and deepen the slot of the skrew with a jeweler´s saw. Grind the blade of a skrew driver to make a snug fit in the slot , then undo the skrew.
    It works for me that way....
    Good luck!
    Burkhard
     
  3. KurtinSA

    KurtinSA Registered User
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    Burkhard -

    I appreciate the insight. I'm a fan of AeroKroil, so I applied some to the joint. After a bit, I cleaned up the far side of the screw so it wouldn't drag that through and ruin the threads in the saddle bracket. I then found a tight fitting screwdriver and applied pressure to hold it in the slot (I had a glove on the other hand!!) and was able to turn the screw out. Whew!

    But I discovered that the upper block (and now I see the lower block as well) have no screws holding the sides together. I'm not sure how that works to hold the suspension spring in place. Maybe being squeezed by the saddle? I really don't see how that works...as well as the lower block.

    I will have to look through my spares for a more standard set up for a replacement.

    Kurt

    HallerSaddle3.jpg
     
  4. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

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    Some of the later suspension assemblies have their components electrically welded together as a unit and can't be dismantled.
     
  5. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    Haller allways was on the cheaper side of producers; for reasons of competitiveness these cheaper producers looked for methods to spare costs.One was to either weld or rivet together the blocks.Replace with a standard!Glad You got it out!
    Burkhard
     
  6. KurtinSA

    KurtinSA Registered User
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    Yes, it's quite evident of the savings in making these clocks. Plastic backing for the dial, thin plates, plastic gears, cutting corners on the suspension spring. That said, it seems that every time I work on one and get it up and running, they seem to run very well. This latest one ended up with 360 degrees of rotation and over swing around 60 degrees. I realize a number of variables go into that, but with little effort, these Hallers seem to run well for me.

    And this latest one cleaned up nice. The dial is attractive, too!

    Kurt

    HallerDone.jpg
     
  7. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

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    Except for the fragile plastic anchor and need to replace the spring with a Horolovar, these really aren't bad clocks from an operational perspective.
     
  8. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    in my experiance the main spring delivers quiet a good amount of power down to the anchor , therefor they run when others wouldn´t due to dirt and dried up oil and they rotate quiet well.
    Burkhard
     
  9. KurtinSA

    KurtinSA Registered User
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    Burkhard -

    Interesting point about the power from the main spring. I notice that the spec mainspring for this Haller is 18x38 (thickness is 0.46mm) while a standard Schatz is 19x38 (thickness 0.41). I believe the power comes from the thickness, right? The cross section of an 18mm x 0.46mm is 8.28 sq-mm while a 19mm x 0.41mm is 7.79. I guess that's a sizable difference.

    Kurt
     
  10. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    I´m not too good in maths and physics,Kurt,but I recall that John said something about the power of Hallers long ago and of all my anniversaries the Hallers have the loudest tick.
    Burkhard
     

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