Make-Your-Own bushings?

bangster

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This is a spin-off from bchaps' Pivot Hole thread.

People talk about making their own bushings from scratch. I'd like a blow-by-blow description of the process. I understand how to turn the outer diameter, and how to drill the inner hole. But I do NOT understand how to separate the bush from the parent stock. Somebody pliz tell me about "parting off", and the proper tool for doing it, and how to get the bush separated without it flying off into hyperspace and getting lost.

bangster
 

bangster

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This is a spin-off from bchaps' Pivot Hole thread.

People talk about making their own bushings from scratch. I'd like a blow-by-blow description of the process. I understand how to turn the outer diameter, and how to drill the inner hole. But I do NOT understand how to separate the bush from the parent stock. Somebody pliz tell me about "parting off", and the proper tool for doing it, and how to get the bush separated without it flying off into hyperspace and getting lost.

bangster
 

eskmill

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The bushing stock, is "parted-off" in the desired length (or height) using the parting tool.

The tool used for parting is simply a narrow graver. A fair amount of practice is essential to minimize friction on the sides of the graver as the cut progresses. A little kerosene helps.

Many use a reshaped X-Acto blade or similar material for parting.

Personally, I "catch" the drilled bushing with a piece of wire in the hole just before the cut is complete. Even with that precaution, I still loose them occasionally.
 

David Robertson

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Bangster...

If you have Huckabee's book "300 Tradesecrets of the Master Clockmaker".. or something like that.. he shows how to make a cutoff tool out of an exacto knife. It works well.

I have also found that a jeweler's saw works very well for cutting off small brass stock. Do it while it is turning in the lathe. It allows a more precise location of the cutoff than using a cutoff ftool (for me anyway)... That is how I usually cut off bushings when I make them in the lathe.

David
 

SSWood

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My own lathe is quite small, and doesn't really have the power to use a cut-off tool. I've never thought of using an X-Acto blade, and may give it a try. David's suggestion of using the jewelers saw is a good one .. I found that using my piercing saw, with the blade reversed , parts off pieces quite quickly, and where I want them
 

bangster

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LUVVERLY suggestions, both wire in the hole and jeweler's saw. I may actually try making bushings one of these days.

Thanks much.

bangster
 

Mike Phelan

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I, too, just saw them off and turn the sawn end to clean it up.
I have never bought a bush in my life.
Old round plug pins before the 13-amp ones came were a fruitful source of brass rod. :)
 

K Reindel

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In "Top 300 Trade Secrets of a Master Clockmaker" by Huckabee, check out pages 42-45.

In "Practical Clock Repairing" by Donald deCarle, check out pages 26-28. DeCarle describes the use of wheel chamfering tools. These are available from Timesavers and others. The use of file ends ground for use as chamfering tools is also described.

I don't know when I used a bushing from a kit last, years ago. I never liked the unsightly, large holes you needed to cut for the standard bushings, the way the reamers cut (bulging the holes and drifting from center), or the huge bushing tools consuming valuable bench space. I'm getting neater results and bushings are nearly invisible.

I grind away the cutting edge of an Xacto blade mounted in the hobby knife. It makes an outstanding cutoff tool. Then use a round end broach to hold on to the bushing when it breaks free. Using this method you'll never lose a bushing.

Having a watchmakers staking set is infinitely valuable for this work, too. It makes riveting the bushings in a breeze.

Lastly, what you can do has virtually no limits. Yesterday I rebushed two escape wheel pivots on a small parlor clock. The pivots (and thus pivot holes) were .005" diameter and the OD of the bushing I made was around .030". You can't even tell there's a bushing installed now. The plates were so thin that a press fit bushing would never have held.

Ken
 

John Echternach

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Huckabee's exacto knife gizmo is my 1st choice as a parting tool with any small soft lathe material. I think the largest dia. I parted was about 3/8". Sincerely, John#0159010
 

bangster

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I take it that the X-acto blade should have a squared-off tip (removes a thin shaving) rather than a knife point. Correct?

bangster
 

K Reindel

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You're right, it should be "squared" off actually with a relief of maybe 15-20 degrees from square (that would make it about a 70-75 degree angle).

Ken
 

Jerry Kieffer

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Years ago when still using a Jewelers lathe I used all of the methods suggested so far plus a few combinations of each. Of course each achieve the goal with various degrees of accuracy. Results were dependent on the shape, hardness and how sharp the tool was. A thin tool is much easier to master than a wide one. But as Les has said each method requires a lot of practice and skill to be efficient.

On the other had If you select a 3"-4" swing modern Lathe with a carriage and cross slide controled by leadscrew/calibrated Handwheels, the task is simple,fast and very precise. First a cut-off/Parting tool is mounted in the tool post or as a seperate mounting on the rear side of the work piece. In this case the blade is mounted upside down and cuts from the bottom as the work piece rotates up against it. The advantage of this type mount is that it can be left mounted out of the way on the cross slide but still be in place for immediate use. To position the cut-off tool you line up the right corner of the blade even with the front corner of the work piece. Then the carriage handwheel is used to move the tool down the work piece so that the exact length can be parted. With a calibrated leadscrew handwheel the position can easily positioned within plus or minus .001" or even closer. If properly positioned when starting with magification the handwheel will perform the exact measurement. once in position the the parting tool is moved against the work piece with the cross slide hand wheel and the work is parted within a few seconds. The advantage of this system is that the part will be exact size every time as well as square and have a very nice finish if qaulity cutting tools are used. It also requires no more skill than reading a handwheel.

The added avantage of using this type lathe for bushing work is that it will allow bushing holes to be bored to any size when using a boring bar. Boring a hole assures that the hole will be centered,round and have a superior finish. With a boring bar you no longer need to rely on available drill sizes and the rough finish that they leave, or have enough material left for hand finishing to size. Drills also have a tendency to wander all over the place no matter if you have a proper center or how they are held even with the work rotating in a lathe. This is easily demonstrated when taking a light cut with a boring bar on any drilled hole.

Jerry Kieffer
 

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