"Majesti" with Ronda quartz movement?

MuseChaser

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One of the first gifts my wife gave me, back when we were dating in the late 1970s, was what I believe was an inexpensive pocket watch labeled "Majesti" with "Swiss" and "Quartz" stamped on the face. It stopped working decades ago, and battery replacements didn't work. I've saved it all these years because... well.... sentimental attachment. Given recent successes with torsion clocks and some strike clocks, I figured I'd dive into this one and see if I could get it running, or at least replace the movement. Managed to figure out how to release the crown shaft, remove the bezel and crystal, and pull the movement from the case, but I can't see how exactly to remove the hands and I don't want to take a chance and break them. Also, don't see anything obviously wrong with the movement, but it would have to be VERY obvious for me to notice, since I have no real idea what to look for. I've attached pics of the back and front of the movement, battery removed. Can anyone chime in with advice as to how to either get this one running or what movement would be the correct replacement? Hand removal? The movement says "RONDA," but I don't see a specific model number engraved anywhere... just "SWISS PARTS," "USA," and the arrow indicating what to press to release the crown shaft. Is the number on the silver cylinder (looks like a tiny capacitor, but I don't know what it is really) the movement model number? KDS6G?

Thanks in advance for any help!

. RondaMovt.jpg
MajestiFace.jpg


EDIT: Upon further exploration using higher magnification, I found "313" on the black plastic part of the movement, and "FGC" on a metal part. You can see them on either side of the battery well in the above picture. Also found a video on the Ronda site of someone replacing the coil. Seems like ordering a new 313 movement would solve it, an they're only $10 or so. Would any of the 5 series calibers be a direct fit/swap? Same hand attachments? How DO the hands attach?

Thanks again..
 
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roughbarked

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Yes it is less expensive to buy a new movement than to try and repair or replace the coil. Yes you may swap a good coil from another movement but it will most likely have to be from a 313 Ronda. From having had to do a lot of this over the years, have noticed that Ronda/Harley movements don't usually have interchangeable coils between similar looking movements.
The coils in any quartz movement can be very easily damaged and fitting the battery is the obvious instance where this occurs due to basic inexperienced ineptitude.
However, the missing piece that is obvious to me is the insulator that goes under the negative contact between it and the plate. In Ronda movements this is usually transparent orange in colour.
Any plastic thin enough to fit can be cut to shape with scissors or razor blade, craft knife.. Put an insulator in and see if this solves the problem.

As for replacement movements;
Best to get the 313 if it is still available which I doubt.
You'll need to know the dimensions of the movement. You'll also need to know where the dial feet fit.
ie: check the image I've posted. This is probably the replacement you need but I'd still need to know where the dial feet are.
The hands simply pres on and pull off. Care(great care) needs to be taken to avoid harming either the dial or the hands. There are a lot of posts on these forums about how the various methods of removing and replacing hands can be done.
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Skutt50

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Personally I do not work on quartz watches. Having said that, I do on occation come across some quartz movements that are condemed to the waste bin. Do not work with new battery and no economic or sentimantal value....

A while back I did have a closer look at one of these. I took it apart and it became obvious why that unit did not work. There is a rather strong magnet inside that acts like a motor, so to say. This magnet had attracted some magnetic dirt and thats why it did not move. After cleaning the magnet, to my surprise, it started running again.

After that I brought forward some 10 of these non working movements. Instead of taking them fully apart I moved one of the small plastic wheels that I could reach from the battery opening. This seems to have turned the magnet enough to clear the debree and believe it or not but 7 or 8 of the watches started running again...... Not a permanent fix but it tells me that the electronics is OK.......

If you have decided to discard the movement, it may be worth a try. If something breaks, no harm done.... right?

Another trick I heard about is to simple demagnetize the watch. This idea came from a friend who use one of these demagnetizers where you push a lever and there is an impulse that demagnetizes the part. I have not yet tried it myself....
 
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roughbarked

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A tip here and it is for all electronic watch and clock movements that have magnets. The tiny watch rotors up to those older types with a balance wheel spinning past magnets.
* When cleaning the movement, use adhesive tape(the clear stuff) press it onto the magnet, pull it off. You'll notice black stuff stick to the sticky tape. Repeat this with another clean bit of tape until it comes up clear. This can also be done with the magnets that cause pendulums to keep swinging.
 

roughbarked

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Instead of taking them fully apart I moved one of the small plastic wheels that I could reach from the battery opening. This seems to have turned the magnet enough to clear the debree and believe it or not but 7 or 8 of the watches started running again...... Not a permanent fix but it tells me that the electronics is OK.......
Personally would hesitate to advise others to try turning the train wheels with tools. Even a toothpick can damage many of the wheels found in a quartz watch movement.
Even so, if there is grit in a tooth and the wheels are turned, the grit may well have the capacity to damage the wheel.
If there is any substance impeding the train, it needs to be cleaned properly as with any watch. The grit will end up falling back in somewhere.

There are numerous methods and tools to ascertain whether the 'lectrics are working.
I find that the ETIC No. 340. 585 which I have used since the 1980's is perfect for checking whether the watch has a functioning circuit. Can do it without opening the watch, if the battery is good.
There is a newer model ETIC no. 340.587 available these days.
 
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MuseChaser

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Wow.. thanks to all of you for such great information! I cut a small piece of plastic to replace the insulator, but the battery is totally dead. probably from being shorted out without that insulator there. Have no idea what happened to it. I took the keeper plate, crystal, and coil out, looking for a magnet to clean, but couldn't locate one. I can see the tiny gears inside the assembly and they seem to be free, but it's SO tiny that I got scared to go any further. I'll order a new movement, then use this one to practice on. Maybe pickup a new battery first and see if, by some miracle, anything I did made a difference. Thanks again!
 

Skutt50

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If you follow the gear train the magnet will be the last wheel in the chain. (It is attached to an arbor and rotates.)

Keep us posted when you instal the battery...... You just might have a running movement......

Good luck.
 

Wayno To Go

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There are numerous methods and tools to ascertain whether the 'lectrics are working.
I find that the ETIC No. 340. 585 which I have used since the 1980's is perfect for checking whether the watch has a functioning circuit. Can do it without opening the watch, if the battery is good.
There is a newer model ETIC no. 340.587 available these days.
roughbarked
I'm searching for this ETIC tester and can't find one. Did Horotec buy them out? The Horotec devices look similar.
Thanks in advance.
Wayne
 

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