M E Blakeslee

Andy Newcomer

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Aug 17, 2020
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Just acquired this rough old Blakeslee clock. Can anyone tell if all the parts that are there are original?

55BBAAE9-846F-4771-8C26-8A0A6EFC17D7.jpeg B4AD4CD7-8240-48CB-9C02-19CFFB1BF84B.jpeg 63CE8232-8D7E-4610-86C2-BF6570EB52E7.jpeg 776B3FC7-9B83-48C1-AF7D-F1CEDB48978A.jpeg AF14DC7B-9273-4C50-BB4E-C3681D98BB4A.jpeg
 

turboflyer

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Might try looking under wood movement clocks. It sure looks like one I recently acquired , c 1880. I posted pics of part of the process. My cherry wood arrived this week so it going to get interesting. Good luck and cool clock.
 

Andy Newcomer

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Might try looking under wood movement clocks. It sure looks like one I recently acquired , c 1880. I posted pics of part of the process. My cherry wood arrived this week so it going to get interesting. Good luck and cool clock.
I thought I read somewhere that Blakeslee only produced clocks from 1832-1834? I maybe wrong though.
 

turboflyer

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I thought I read somewhere that Blakeslee only produced clocks from 1832-1834? I maybe wrong though.
I am not even close to an expert. Maybe a spurt. It looks so close. I know their are those that can pin down the details.I working on it.
 

Jerome collector

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According to Roberts & Taylor's Eli Terry and the Connecticut Shelf Clock, M & E Blakeslee was in business c. 1832, and they made their own movements. Spittlers & Bailey (2nd ed.) give the same date for the business. The movement in your clock is a type 1.72, made by Riley Whiting (according to research published by Snowden Taylor). Snowden does not list M & E Blakeslee as a user of Whiting's movements. Based on info in these sources, there's a possibility the movement is not original to the case. You might check to see whether the holes for the retention pins holding the movement in the vertical rails line up nicely or if there's an extra set of holes or evidence of the holes being reamed out.

Others are better suited to comment on originality of other aspects, however my thoughts are: 1) the minute hand is not original; 2) the splat (unusual shape) may be original but stenciling likely not; 3) it probably had feet (look on bottom of case for witness marks); and 4) the stenciling on the half-columns is very nice and almost certainly original.
Mike
 
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Andy Newcomer

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Aug 17, 2020
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According to Roberts & Taylor's Eli Terry and the Connecticut Shelf Clock, M & E Blakeslee was in business c. 1832, and they made their own movements. Spittlers & Bailey (2nd ed.) give the same date for the business. The movement in your clock is a type 1.72, made by Riley Whiting (according to research published by Snowden Taylor). Snowden does not list M & E Blakeslee as a user of Whiting's movements. Based on info in these sources, there's a possibility the movement is not original to the case. You might check to see whether the holes for the retention pins holding the movement in the vertical rails line up nicely or if there's an extra set of holes or evidence of the holes being reamed out.

Others are better suited to comment on originality of other aspects, however my thoughts are: 1) the minute hand is not original; 2) the splat (unusual shape) may be original but stenciling likely not; 3) it probably had feet (look on bottom of case for witness marks); and 4) the stenciling on the half-columns is very nice and almost certainly original.
Mike
I have a Riley Whiting clock being delivered next week. I’ll definitely have compare the two. Great information. Thank you
 

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