Lots of bears

Discussion in 'Member News and Views' started by Dano4734, May 31, 2019.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Dano4734

    Dano4734 Registered User

    going to do some Alaska fishing and bringing my 992b as always. Well I may do better with a fishing pole instead. Lots of bears for sure just ask bob if you can find him:)

    23A9AF04-429A-422B-B3A0-EB77C7FA2F09.jpeg
     
    Jon Hanson likes this.
  2. Ethan Lipsig

    Ethan Lipsig Registered User
    NAWCC Gold Member

    Jan 8, 2006
    1,770
    535
    113
    Pasadena
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Just remember that they also like to fish.

    IMG_9511.JPG

    Taken at Brooks Falls, Alaska in 2009
     
    Tom McIntyre, Jon Hanson and Dano4734 like this.
  3. musicguy

    musicguy Moderator
    NAWCC Member Sponsor

    Jan 12, 2017
    4,101
    1,684
    113
    New York State
    Country Flag:
    Ethan did you take that photo, very nice.


    Rob
     
  4. Ethan Lipsig

    Ethan Lipsig Registered User
    NAWCC Gold Member

    Jan 8, 2006
    1,770
    535
    113
    Pasadena
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I did take the photo, Rob. Visiting Brooks Falls was a remarkable experience. It is one of two famous falls in Alaska where bears congregate to fish for salmon (the other is McNeil Falls). Both are in or near Katmai National Park. Access to both are limited. To get to Brooks, we flew from Anchorage to King Salmon on a small passenger jet. From there, we continued on by small float plane to Brooks Lake, which the Brooks River feeds. As we landed, we could see grizzlies swimming in the lake and ambling on the shore. Brooks is in Katmai National Park. On landing we were ushered directly into a ranger-led bear safety training program before be permitted to continue on by foot to the adjacent Brooks Lodge, which is a collection of one-story buildings on the forested shore of Brooks Lake. We were warned to stay hundreds of feet away from any grizzly. Easier said than done.

    The main attraction at Brooks is the falls. To get to them, one walks through the Brooks Lodge grounds to the Brooks River just beyond it. One crosses the river on a bridge, walks about a half mile down a dirt road, then about a quarter of a mile on a path through the forest before getting to a gated, fenced-in, raised walkway to the falls, where there is a raised viewing platform about six feet above the ground. The falls are right in front of the platform. They teamed with bears. I was standing next to a National Geographic camera-man when I took the photo I posted.

    It wasn't easy to stay hundreds of feet away from the bears. They were everywhere. They were literally below our feet when we were on the viewing platform. When we walked back to the lodge, we were shocked to see a huge one was ambling down the path about 20 feet from us when rounded a bend in the trail. We couldn't cross the bridge back to the lodge because a bear was sleeping by the gate to the bridge. Later, when we walked back to our cabin, we found a bear sleeping on our doorstep.

    I'm not a wildlife junkie, but I have seen some memorable fauna, e.g., herds of elephants crossing the Okavango River or lions eating an unfortunate rhino. The Brooks Falls bears were the most impressive. I highly recommend a visit. Brooks Lodge - Katmai National Park: Katmailand
     
    musicguy likes this.
  5. Dano4734

    Dano4734 Registered User

    My Alaska spot and my fishing buddy. They will steal your fish as soon as you turn your back

    30E30547-5947-415E-8EC9-BCD1006DDA6E.jpeg 487B1622-DDDD-4D92-8194-03BCD4F4634E.jpeg
     
    Jon Hanson likes this.

Share This Page