Lord Sanford German Electric men's wristwatch

Albert58S

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Jan 21, 2021
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I have a Lord Sanford men's electric wristwatch that is a big mystery. I find no information on the internet about Lord Sandford electric wristwatches, their age, their history, or their rarity. The mint clean brown dial of the watch is marked "GERMAN" below the six, not like normal markings of most watches having SWISS.
It is a day/date watch and has a large case at 38mm. There is a battery cover and I installed a battery. The second hand moves, but not the minute and hour hands. Not sure how the back cover removes to look at what is marked on the movement, as there is a smooth transition as though the back cover was pressed into the case. With the battery removed, I tried to pry the cover off, but it would not budge, so I did not go any further. I know a watchmaker will need to look at it.
Anybody who knows or can give more information about the suspected age of this German wristwatch (1960's/1970's?) or who was the actual manufacturer would be appreciated. Pictures of the brown dial and back of the watch is attached.

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John Arrowood

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Dec 14, 2001
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The movement is probably an ESA 9154 if it uses a 344 battery. These movements were used behind many watch company dials: Elgin, Waltham, and others. Elgins have Swissonic on the dial and Walthams have Dynotron. on the dial.
Sears Tradition brand also used this movement. Some have a battery hatch that can be removed to install a new battery and some must have to whole back removed to get the battery which is held down by a strap with a teeny tiny screw at each end that have to be removed so the strap can be lifted and the old battery taken out. Getting those screws back where they belong is not easy for shaky hands. If you look for Swissonic on Ebay you will find a bunch of them or you can google ESA-9154.
 

John Arrowood

NAWCC Member
NAWCC Gold Member
Dec 14, 2001
790
204
43
Sorry, I mis-remembered. The Waltham watches have the word Electrodyne on the dial, not dynotron. I don't know why I keep forgetting the correct name.
 

Albert58S

Registered User
Jan 21, 2021
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The movement is probably an ESA 9154 if it uses a 344 battery. These movements were used behind many watch company dials: Elgin, Waltham, and others. Elgins have Swissonic on the dial and Walthams have Dynotron. on the dial.
Sears Tradition brand also used this movement. Some have a battery hatch that can be removed to install a new battery and some must have to whole back removed to get the battery which is held down by a strap with a teeny tiny screw at each end that have to be removed so the strap can be lifted and the old battery taken out. Getting those screws back where they belong is not easy for shaky hands. If you look for Swissonic on Ebay you will find a bunch of them or you can google ESA-9154.
Thanks John for the information. After looking at the dynotron reference website (reference.grail-watch.com) for the link that user roughbarked" gave me, I have determined the watch has a ETA-ESA-9158 day/date movement, manufactured in 1975, and with a respectable 28800 A/h. The ETA-ESA data from the Ranfft website also matches the watch dimensions, as it has a Dm of 29mm. I measured the diameter of the crystal and it is close to 29mm which validates the Ranfft information. The watch has a quickset date and there is a mechanical hacking feature, since the second hand stops when you pull out the stem to adjust the time. This also agrees with Ranfft.
Below the six on the dial, it is marked GERMANY, not GERMAN, as the Y was very weak and I could barely see it with my 90X magnifier. So I have learned a lot about this watch from your information and the information "roughbarked" gave me. I appreciate it. The only question remaining is: Who manufactured the watch, since it has a GERMANY dial? I showed the watch to the watchmaker who works on my watches and he was pretty certain the movement had to be removed thru the crystal. Seeing what is stamped or marked on the movement may be the only way to solve this manufacturer mystery.
 

Albert58S

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Jan 21, 2021
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Thanks John for the information. After looking at the dynotron reference website (reference.grail-watch.com) for the link that user roughbarked" gave me, I have determined the watch has a ETA-ESA-9158 day/date movement, manufactured in 1975, and with a respectable 28800 A/h. The ETA-ESA data from the Ranfft website also matches the watch dimensions, as it has a Dm of 29mm. I measured the diameter of the crystal and it is close to 29mm which validates the Ranfft information. The watch has a quickset date and there is a mechanical hacking feature, since the second hand stops when you pull out the stem to adjust the time. This also agrees with Ranfft.
Below the six on the dial, it is marked GERMANY, not GERMAN, as the Y was very weak and I could barely see it with my 90X magnifier. So I have learned a lot about this watch from your information and the information "roughbarked" gave me. I appreciate it. The only question remaining is: Who manufactured the watch, since it has a GERMANY dial? I showed the watch to the watchmaker who works on my watches and he was pretty certain the movement had to be removed thru the crystal. Seeing what is stamped or marked on the movement may be the only way to solve this manufacturer mystery.
Curiosity got the best of me. I removed the battery cover and battery and took pictures into the electronic movement. The mystery about the movement/watch manufacturer only increased. If this movement was a ETA-ESA-9158, then why is the balance spring to the left of the battery? (ESA-9158 has the balance spring right of the battery).
ETA-ESA-9154 has the balance spring to the left of the battery, but it does not have a semi-quickset feature per Ranfft website. Plus ESA-9154 is too small at 28mm. There are some other strange configurations about this movement, as there is a bar or bridge of some kind over the top of the balance spring that is different than the other ESA-9100 series movements. Seems like the hacking configuration is also different. Pictures are attached of the balance spring area and the bridge/bar over the top of the balance spring. Anybody have answers to why this electronic movement has differences, or can identify it, would be appreciated. ... German precision engineering.. :)

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Albert58S

Registered User
Jan 21, 2021
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ESA 9157?
ESA 9157 is a date only movement. Mine would be a ESA 9158 family for day/date.
bidfun-db Archive: Watch Movements: ETA-ESA 9158 (ranfft.de)

The mystery is that the electronic movement is probably in the Dynotron family somehow, but its configuration does not match the 9157/9158 family, especially for the balance wheel position, nor does its configuration match those shown on the ESA Dynotron website. I may have to have the crystal removed to see the movement, but I know most times the crystals break when pulled off. If the crystal is unavailable, that puts me in a quandary, but then again, the minute and hour hands are not moving. If I do decide to have the movement removed, I will post good pictures.

I found that all of the Dynotron movement watches listed on Ebay and across the internet all say Swiss in one manner or another on the bottom of the dial. I have not as of yet found one Dynotron or electric/electronic watch with "Germany".
 

Albert58S

Registered User
Jan 21, 2021
11
2
3
62
Country
ESA 9157 is a date only movement. Mine would be a ESA 9158 family for day/date.
bidfun-db Archive: Watch Movements: ETA-ESA 9158 (ranfft.de)

The mystery is that the electronic movement is probably in the Dynotron family somehow, but its configuration does not match the 9157/9158 family, especially for the balance wheel position, nor does its configuration match those shown on the ESA Dynotron website. I may have to have the crystal removed to see the movement, but I know most times the crystals break when pulled off. If the crystal is unavailable, that puts me in a quandary, but then again, the minute and hour hands are not moving. If I do decide to have the movement removed, I will post good pictures.

I found that all of the Dynotron movement watches listed on Ebay and across the internet all say Swiss in one manner or another on the bottom of the dial. I have not as of yet found one Dynotron or electric/electronic watch with "Germany".
* * * * *
Mystery of German Lord Sanford watch movement solved!
I picked up my super rare Baylor 200 meter tachymetre men's dive watch from another watchmaker I've started doing business with and I showed him the Lord Sanford Germany electric watch. He pulled the crystal off, determined the movement was accessed from the back, and reinstalled the crystal with no cracks or breaks. He then successfully removed the back cover and exposed its electronic movement.

The watch has a PUW 1002 "Porta elechron" movement, which I never knew about before today. (I've knew about the Wittnauer Electro-Chron, since I have one in my collection). The PUW 1002 is a large 12.5 lignes movement, just as I suspected to go along with the 38mm case, 7 jewels and an impressive 28,800 A/h for being a 51 year old, ca. 1970 watch. This watchmaker is definitely what you call a true "master watchmaker". If the parts are not available, I found out he builds them, and it doesn't matter whether it is a wall clock, grandfather clock, electric clock, any mechanical clock. He also works on quartz clocks and will build wristwatch/pocket watch crystals if they are not available. This new watchmaker has totally impressed me.

For those who like to see rare wristwatches and to get everyone's interest up, I've mentioned the (1965) Baylor dive watch above, because I am planning to show pictures of it on the watch forums, now that it has been fully serviced. It has a rotating bezel and is the top watch in my Baylor collection. Its colorful ETA 2472 brass movement has a wow factor. The second hand flows, does not tick, and is even luminescent.

Attached are pictures of the Lord Sanford German PUW 1002. It is impressive, as it looks to be mostly brass. Not only is it impressive, but its configuration having a battery slot accessible through a sealed cover is unique. This caused some noticeable changes in the configuration for normal PUW 1002's. The hacking mechanism appears to be the same, except it is covered by a brass or copper plate, that is part of the battery's positive terminal. I suspect this German wristwatch, made by Roberta Watch Co., is fairly rare with its unique PUW 1002 battery configuration. >> I've also attached a picture of the luminous dial feature of this impressive watch.

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