Looking for handy tool/method

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by MuensterMann, Apr 22, 2019.

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  1. MuensterMann

    MuensterMann Registered User

    Mar 23, 2008
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    Looking for a handy-dandy tool and/or method for those times putting back together a movement and the mainspring is lopsided towards your second wheel and thus interfering with putting the second wheel pivot safely straight into its hole. I usually use my left hand to hold the mainspring in towards the post while I tighten a coated wire around the mainspring and post to hold it away from interfering with the second wheel safe alignment. However, it is awkward to tighten up the wire with one hand (usually with mainspring lubricant on it), thus I am looking for some strap-like device that I can tighten up easily.

    What are your suggestions?
     
  2. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    A heavy-duty zip tie (cable tie) will work. NOT dime-store cheapies if you value your health. Except there should be a stud on the plate to curtail the spring.
     
  3. MuensterMann

    MuensterMann Registered User

    Mar 23, 2008
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    Even with that stud, there are some mainsprings (e.g. the large 30 day ones) that like to swell out in the direction of that second wheel.
     
  4. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    I nudge the spring away from the hole and put the pivot in place. As the plates come together, the 2nd wheel can be manhandled into the upper hole in the same way, and then it will stay put.
     
  5. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Dec 18, 2011
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    I started out using the round cross section "C" clamps and then some flat ones when the round wouldn't fit and finally ended up just using soft annealed wire. I have found that prior to disassembly and when letting down the springs is when it is important to let them down such that they are just within the diameter of the great wheel. This helps with disassembly as it doesn't want to move the arbours out of position when the top plate comes off.

    Now this is important. When servicing the spring in the spring winder, save the containment wire...don't cut it off. Use it to contain the spring when you have all finished the service. If it fit when it came out it will be good on the way back.

    16 awg wheels in place.jpg

    David
     
    Kevin W. and Old Rivers like this.
  6. R&A

    R&A Registered User

    Oct 21, 2008
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    M44672045.jpg
    Click on image to zoom
    Loop End Mainspring Winder
    Mainspring winder for loop end mainsprings. Winds springs on the main wheel. 2-3/8" x 3-3/4". Made in India.
    Timesavers
    Pricing: $8.50
    Buy one of these.
    I put mine on a lathe and opened up the hole to make clearance for clicks on bigger wheel.
    And then get yourself some clamps to hold the spring.
    The more wound you can get the spring to it's smallest size, is much easier to install.
     
  7. Fitzclan

    Fitzclan Registered User

    Jul 20, 2014
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    I find that there is an optimum size at which to restrain the spring. The smallest you can get it will cause problems on reassemble as the distance from the loop end to the pivot will not be enough to connect both, it will pull. I think DS has it about right.
     
  8. Altashot

    Altashot Registered User

    Oct 12, 2017
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    I’ve been using hose clamps for years. I normally pre bend them in the desired shape before installing them and letting the springs down into them. They somewhat retain their shape even under tension.

    M.
     
  9. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    Despite everyone's objections, I still like heavy-duty zip ties. Quick n easy to apply, quick n easy to remove (snip snip). :emoji_anguished:
     
  10. MuensterMann

    MuensterMann Registered User

    Mar 23, 2008
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    Thank you for sharing how you handle this problem. I was hoping someone knew of some little straps with ratchets that could be found at any ole hardware store. However, HEAVY-duty zip times and hose clamps may work for me. What I am missing is the easy way to make the loop tighten with only one hand.
     
  11. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Ah one handed. You need a bigger version of the matrix band retainer that dentists use :).

    David
     
  12. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    Yep. Teeth.
     
  13. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

    Aug 17, 2014
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    I had a treacherous Korean 31-day time/strike that required C-clips to contain the springs plus an additional zip tie or two on each one to bind the spring to its nearest movement post. What I really needed were some smaller C-clips: flat ones, sawn from a piece of iron plumbing pipe or flat steel bar stock hammered around a mandrel. I've used worm gear hose clamps with some degree of success, but that worm gear housing is forever getting in the way.

    M Kinsler
     

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