• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Longcase weights: which way round?

jeules0

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May 26, 2009
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On my c1850 Scottish longcase clock are 2 weights-one marked 11 pounds, one marked 13 pounds. Currently, I have the 11 on the strike and the 13 on the going train. Is this right? Read on a longcase website that they should be other way round, but can't find a definitive answer. Clock runs fine as is, but obviously I'd like to get it right so not to do any damage. I know you guys will have the solution! Thanks, Chris.
 

Ansomnia

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Sep 11, 2005
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Chris, the heavier, 13 lb. weight is generally used on the strike train. 11 lbs. is the norm for a longcase going train. I don't think any damage would occur over a short period but the robust strike action works better with a heavier weight. When a clock strikes, the wheels have to get going and accelerate rather quickly; not so with the steady going train. The going train is really a tortoise compared to the strike train.


Michael
 

jeules0

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Chris, the heavier, 13 lb. weight is generally used on the strike train. 11 lbs. is the norm for a longcase going train. I don't think any damage would occur over a short period but the robust strike action works better with a heavier weight. When a clock strikes, the wheels have to get going and accelerate rather quickly; not so with the steady going train. The going train is really a tortoise compared to the strike train.


Michael
Thanks, Michael, that seems to concur with what I have read elsewhere.

I think I put them the other way round because on Vienna-style wall clocks the slightly heavier weight (if there is one) goes on the time side (Or does it:???: Got me wondering now!)
 

Ansomnia

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Chris, I am not Vienna-style wall clock collector but I imagine their weights would have been chosen for the same mechanical reasons as longcase ones. I believe original Vienna wall clocks were very well-made so their going trains would not have needed "extra help".

I looked at a few high-end Vienna-style wall clocks on Derek Roberts's website and actually they all seem to use the same size weights, even on 3-train movements.


Michael
 

Mike Phelan

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Dec 17, 2003
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Read on a longcase website that they should be other way round, but can't find a definitive answer.
There isn't one, Chris, as this is a hand-made clock, and the maker would decide. Many are the same weight on both trains.

As others say, the heavier one is probably for the strike, and my guess is that if the clock stopped because it needed a clean and lube, someone has swapped the weights around.

The last one I overhauled where that had been done made the pendulum hit the case sides until I put the weights the right way round! :eek:
 

jeules0

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May 26, 2009
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There isn't one, Chris, as this is a hand-made clock, and the maker would decide. Many are the same weight on both trains.

As others say, the heavier one is probably for the strike, and my guess is that if the clock stopped because it needed a clean and lube, someone has swapped the weights around.

The last one I overhauled where that had been done made the pendulum hit the case sides until I put the weights the right way round! :eek:
Thanks, Michael & Mike. When I bought the clock at at Detling antiques fair the weights weren't attached, so the decision to put the heavier one on the going train was mine. I have now swapped the weights round so the strike has the heavier one and it's running fine, as it indeed it did with them the other way round. The weights are a matching pair made by Gill and marked 11 & 13.
 
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