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Longcase clock with no markings - need ID

Elliott Wolin

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Nov 18, 2019
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I picked up this really tall longcase clock at a thrift shop, the case needs work but the movement (time and strike) looks good and the dial isn't too bad. The wooden pendulum rod needs some regluing, the bob is a little dented, and the brass pendulum rating assembly is all bent up and likely needs to be replaced. I didn't see any markings in the store, and when I took the movement out I still saw no markings on the movement or case.

I'd love for the clock to be pre-1850, but I suspect it's more like an early 1900s clock.

It should be straightforward to refurbish the case, purchase a few missing parts, disassemble and clean the movement, and get it all working. The pivots look really good, hardly any wear I can see, perhaps the movement is not original. One odd thing is it came with three weights, but the T&S movement only needs two.

Actually, I did see some writing on the dial, "1753", but it seems highly unlikely to be the date the clock was manufactured. Not that I know anything about this...

20210817_114519.jpg 20210819_214456.jpg 20210819_221352.jpg 20210819_221107.jpg 20210819_221423.jpg 20210819_221445.jpg 20210817_114401.jpg 20210819_221530.jpg 20210819_221244.jpg
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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It's an American clock, probably made around 1915. Others will know more.
Willie X
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Nov 26, 2009
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I picked up this really tall longcase clock at a thrift shop, the case needs work but the movement (time and strike) looks good and the dial isn't too bad. The wooden pendulum rod needs some regluing, the bob is a little dented, and the brass pendulum rating assembly is all bent up and likely needs to be replaced. I didn't see any markings in the store, and when I took the movement out I still saw no markings on the movement or case.

I'd love for the clock to be pre-1850, but I suspect it's more like an early 1900s clock.

It should be straightforward to refurbish the case, purchase a few missing parts, disassemble and clean the movement, and get it all working. The pivots look really good, hardly any wear I can see, perhaps the movement is not original. One odd thing is it came with three weights, but the T&S movement only needs two.

Actually, I did see some writing on the dial, "1753", but it seems highly unlikely to be the date the clock was manufactured. Not that I know anything about this...

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Well, no way it's pre-1850.

I believe that your clock was made in the early 20th century by the Ithaca Calendar Clock Co. of Ithaca, NY. They turn up rather frequently.

They did not make their own movements, acquiring them from CT companies.

My understanding is that these clocks had the production date written in graphite in the bonnet behind the dial. Take a careful look.

Probably no later than 1918, when the company went caput.

They have their fans. To me, they're the Rodney Dangerfield of tall case clocks.

Sort of a sad end to an interesting company that made some really nice double dial calendar clocks.

Hope it's real cheap.

RM
 

Elliott Wolin

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Nov 18, 2019
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Yes, it was pretty cheap as far as I'm concerned, although I know nothing about tallcase clock prices (or any other clock prices, for that matter). I got it for a little under $80.
 

Elliott Wolin

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I looked pretty carefully and don't see any markings in the bonnet, but it's pretty dusty so I'll look again after blowing it out. And I might take off one of the back panels to get another view.
 

JimmyOz

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Feb 21, 2008
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The 3 finials on top and what looks like lead weights would cost a lot more than the amount you paid for the whole thing.
 

Steven Thornberry

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It also looks a lot like a Gilbert Hall Clock #24. Someone wrote that Ithaca used spring-driven movements, and this is weight-driven, so it might be a Gilbert.
Ithaca is known to have used weight-driven movements made by New Haven, and yours is a New Haven movement. Ithaca did use Gilbert spring-driven movements.

Read the following recent thread for an Ithaca longcase with a similar New Haven movement. Be sure to read the back and forth about where the date might be.

Mystery Clock | NAWCC Forums
 

Elliott Wolin

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Steven: just wondering, what tells you that the movement is made by the New Haven Clock Company?

Also, I see an "S" on the left and what looks like a tilted "J" or perhaps a "T" with a little tail (or is that a scratch?) on the right side of the movement. Do these marks mean anything?

20210817_113904.jpg
 

Steven Thornberry

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Steven: just wondering, what tells you that the movement is made by the New Haven Clock Company?

Also, I see an "S" on the left and what looks like a tilted "J" or perhaps a "T" with a little tail (or is that a scratch?) on the right side of the movement. Do these marks mean anything?
What tells me the movement is by New Haven are the double-Y shaped plates, the tapered escape wheel bridge New Haven's later style, adopted ca. 1870), and, of course, the following picture from Tran Duy Ly's New Haven book.
Hall Clock Mvmt..JPG

The "S' and "T" (not "J") are simply someone's scratchings to indicate the time and strike sides of the movement.

BTW, the "1753" on the dial 1753 apparently represents the settlement of the Catawba Indians (pardon my lack of political correctness) on the site of what became Ithaca, NY. See the following; go to the second column - it's the paragraph directly above "ITO."

The World Book: Organized Knowledge in Story and Picture - Google Books
 

Elliott Wolin

NAWCC Member
Nov 18, 2019
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Steven wrote:

"The "S' and "T" (not "J") are simply someone's scratchings to indicate the time and strike sides of the movement."

Well, duh...I had "Seth Thomas" in my head, even though I knew it couldn't come from them, and was also thrown off by thinking the mark on the right side might be a "J." And I usually think in terms of "T&S", not "S&T"...I think I'm getting old and my brain is shutting down...

Of course it should be obvious from the count wheel and lever which side is the strike side.
 

Thomas Sanguigni

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Aug 22, 2018
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That's a bummer. I like the Ithaca GF clocks. It looks like you have an extra weight, the acorn pulls are nice, and the finials are nice, but not correct. I'm not sure about the dial being original.
 

Elliott Wolin

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Nov 18, 2019
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Thomas: what leads you to believe the finials are not original? Did you look at some old catalogs or advertisements? They seem pretty old and tarnished, same as the weight shells.
 

Elliott Wolin

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Nov 18, 2019
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Here's the dlock after refurbishment, running fine for many weeks now. Rating nut/assembly was broken so I'm ordering a new one from Timesavers, thus the clock runs about 5 mins slow per day since the pendulum bob is as low as it can go. And I'm making a new brass weight bottom cap as the original was missing. It looks great in our dining room!



20210924_163458.jpg
 
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Elliott Wolin

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Nov 18, 2019
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I will raise the bob when the rating assembly arrives, it fits onto the bottom of the pendulum rod and the nut pushes the pendulum bob up. I'm ordering this one.


"Here's the dlock after refurbishment..."

And it's a clock, not a dlock!
 

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