Long Lever Embellishment, Am. Tall Case Clock, Early 1800's

bwclock

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I thought the detail on the end of the long lever was a nice touch, as may be seen in the first photograph. The bird's beak has a groove dividing the upper and lower portions of the beak which I was unable to make visible in a photo.

For those who might be curious about the movement, below are a couple more photos, one showing the entire front plate and another showing the thick rack hook from the side. One can note the replacement rack spring in both photographs. An additional photograph shows the wheel collet design.

The clock allegedly ran "back East" years ago but has been sitting unused since its move out West. That is the story, anyway. The movement has modern bushings (Bergeon or KWM) on the center, intermediate and escape wheel arbor locations on the time side of the back plate and a bushing on the front plate for the strike pin wheel(second wheel) arbor. The bushing on the time center wheel is severely worn; despite this this clock runs fine.

I do not see how the clock "ran back East" as the minute wheel post abomination was was wobbly where it threaded into the front plate, consequently the minute wheel pinion was not engaging the hour wheel teeth. There was no way to tighten the post as it was devoid of a shoulder, merely having a loose spacer in the front. I suppose one could fill the threaded hole with something, solder a spacer to the front of the post and try to toque the whole tight to the front plate. It seems a better idea to make new post out of steel. The reason for the taper on the post is that the hole through the minute wheel pinion is tapered and a straight-sided post would wobble. The last photo shows what I am talking about.
Bruce

long lever embellishment.jpg mvmt,.jpg rack hook.jpg wheel collet.jpg min. w. post.jpg
 

bwclock

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Feb 17, 2015
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I thought the detail on the end of the long lever was a nice touch, as may be seen in the first photograph. The bird's beak has a groove dividing the upper and lower portions of the beak which I was unable to make visible in a photo.

For those who might be curious about the movement, below are a couple more photos, one showing the entire front plate and another showing the thick rack hook from the side. One can note the replacement rack spring in both photographs. An additional photograph shows the wheel collet design.

The clock allegedly ran "back East" years ago but has been sitting unused since its move out West. That is the story, anyway. The movement has modern bushings (Bergeon or KWM) on the center, intermediate and escape wheel arbor locations on the time side of the back plate and a bushing on the front plate for the strike pin wheel(second wheel) arbor. The bushing on the time center wheel is severely worn; despite this this clock runs fine.

I do not see how the clock "ran back East" as the minute wheel post abomination was was wobbly where it threaded into the front plate, consequently the minute wheel pinion was not engaging the hour wheel teeth. There was no way to tighten the post as it was devoid of a shoulder, merely having a loose spacer in the front. I suppose one could fill the threaded hole with something, solder a spacer to the front of the post and try to toque the whole tight to the front plate. It seems a better idea to make new post out of steel. The reason for the taper on the post is that the hole through the minute wheel pinion is tapered and a straight-sided post would wobble. The last photo shows what I am talking about.
Bruce

View attachment 720394 View attachment 720395 View attachment 720396 View attachment 720397 View attachment 720400
Well, this statement, above, was wrong..There was no way to tighten the post as it was devoid of a shoulder, merely having a loose spacer in the front. I now see that what I thought was a loose spacer was actually threaded so that if one threaded the post into the front plate and then tightened the spacer the post would not wobble. If whomever made this brass post had soldered the spacer to the post the spacer would not have come loose and allowed the post to wobble. If I had noticed that the spacer was threaded I might have soldered it to the post and the put some sort of goop, tape or whatever around the threaded part of the post so that it might screw into the front plate hole more tightly. Oh, well, too late now. At least the new post is steel, as it should be, so not all is lost.
Bruce
 

Ralph

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Bruce, is that a Pennsylvania clock movment? The movement seems to have Germanic influence.

Ralph
 
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Jim DuBois

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There has been a search for movements with birds head decorations going on recently. While I agree this is most likely a Penn-based clock, these others are not seemingly from there, from what has been found to date. A more popular decorating motif than I would have previously thought.

_DSC0231.jpg _DSC1160.jpg 20180801_172212 (Large).jpg 20180801_172222.jpg 116661464_3256070264444709_5581058486344258075_o.jpg 117133665_3256070551111347_7302029730955029622_o.jpg 117176383_1559220340949063_7807720555848351193_n.png Goolsby (10).jpg
 

bwclock

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Hi Ralph, Beat me! My forte is English clocks. The 12" dial is unsigned and I found no markings anywhere. The movement and dial were brought to me and I have not seen the case in person.
Bruce.
 

bwclock

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There has been a search for movements with birds head decorations going on recently. While I agree this is most likely a Penn-based clock, these others are not seemingly from there, from what has been found to date. A more popular decorating motif than I would have previously thought.

View attachment 720476 View attachment 720477 View attachment 720478 View attachment 720479 View attachment 720480 View attachment 720481 View attachment 720482 View attachment 720483
Jim, Interesting photos, thanks for posting these. It is always a pleasant surprise to find old movements with artistic features, many of which might never be seen by the clock owner and which have nothing to do with the movement's performance.
Bruce
 

Jim DuBois

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The ones I pictured are found in about 6 mantle/shelf clocks, origins unknown. It appears as if there was a single case maker involved, but the movements are a bit different between the cases. Better scholars than me are attempting to figure out what state they were built in and by whom they were built. But the movement you show is all Penn in my thinking. The case may further support that thought.

Kovacik (30).jpg 117192250_3256060777778991_4104484365794482252_o.jpg Goolsby Case.jpg
 

bwclock

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Hi Ralph, Beat me! My forte is English clocks. The 12" dial is unsigned and I found no markings anywhere. The movement and dial were brought to me and I have not seen the case in person.
Bruce.
Not that provides any answer to questions about origin, but here is a photo of the bell. Large. It is wider than the plates, being approx. 5 1/2" while the plate width is 4 3/4".
Bruce

Bell.jpg
 

Ralph

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Hi Ralph, Beat me! My forte is English clocks. The 12" dial is unsigned and I found no markings anywhere. The movement and dial were brought to me and I have not seen the case in person.
Bruce.
Bruce, the rack hook operates and is in a style (not the bird), favored by some Pennsylvania makers.

Ralph
 
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Chris Radano

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Here is a German 30 hour.

Here is a Lancaster County, PA clock with a similar 30 hour.

Your clock shows German influence of the strike work, but is an 8 day. Probably Pennsylvania as the location of origin.
 
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novicetimekeeper

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over here the trip repeat levers are not generally that decorative other than a swirl. However the lantern clock and posted frame clock makers often decorated the hammer stops, sometimes with an animal head, others with a decorative end.
 

bwclock

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over here the trip repeat levers are not generally that decorative other than a swirl. However the lantern clock and posted frame clock makers often decorated the hammer stops, sometimes with an animal head, others with a decorative end.
I thought the detail on the end of the long lever was a nice touch, as may be seen in the first photograph. The bird's beak has a groove dividing the upper and lower portions of the beak which I was unable to make visible in a photo.

For those who might be curious about the movement, below are a couple more photos, one showing the entire front plate and another showing the thick rack hook from the side. One can note the replacement rack spring in both photographs. An additional photograph shows the wheel collet design.

The clock allegedly ran "back East" years ago but has been sitting unused since its move out West. That is the story, anyway. The movement has modern bushings (Bergeon or KWM) on the center, intermediate and escape wheel arbor locations on the time side of the back plate and a bushing on the front plate for the strike pin wheel(second wheel) arbor. The bushing on the time center wheel is severely worn; despite this this clock runs fine.

I do not see how the clock "ran back East" as the minute wheel post abomination was was wobbly where it threaded into the front plate, consequently the minute wheel pinion was not engaging the hour wheel teeth. There was no way to tighten the post as it was devoid of a shoulder, merely having a loose spacer in the front. I suppose one could fill the threaded hole with something, solder a spacer to the front of the post and try to toque the whole tight to the front plate. It seems a better idea to make new post out of steel. The reason for the taper on the post is that the hole through the minute wheel pinion is tapered and a straight-sided post would wobble. The last photo shows what I am talking about.
Bruce

View attachment 720394 View attachment 720395 View attachment 720396 View attachment 720397 View attachment 720400
Here is a German 30 hour.

Here is a Lancaster County, PA clock with a similar 30 hour.

Your clock shows German influence of the strike work, but is an 8 day. Probably Pennsylvania as the location of origin.
Here are some photos the customer sent of the case and dial.
Bruce

Am GF Base.jpeg AM GF Case.jpeg Am GF Dial.jpeg Am GF door.jpeg [/QUOTE]
 
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