Limiting Strike Hours

Discussion in 'Tower, Monumental & Street Clocks' started by sjaffe, Jul 24, 2019.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. sjaffe

    sjaffe Registered User

    Dec 25, 2012
    415
    2
    18
    Engineer
    Santa Rosa,CA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Hello,

    I am maintaining an E. Howard tower clock. The historic building it is in was recently converted to a hotel. The new owner requested that I disable the strike because they didn't think their guests would appreciate hearing the strike all night. I reluctantly disabled the strike. The local newspaper ran an article about this and the community rallied to have the strike back. The hotel owner agreed on a compromise: maintain the strike but not at night. This is like the night time setting on modern grandfather clocks. Upon further questioning, they told me they would actually prefer that the clock only strike at noon and perhaps only once rather than twelve times. So we're still negotiating and discussing the options. From a purely technical point of view, I'd like to determine what options we have. I would prefer not to modify the 1908 E. Howard movement (or at least not extensively). One idea was to install some other mechanism totally independent of the original clock to strike the bell at a predetermined time.

    Any ideas how this could be addressed?

    Thanks,
    Stan
     
  2. FDelGreco

    FDelGreco Registered User
    NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Member Sponsor

    Aug 28, 2000
    1,858
    43
    48
    Male
    Retired chemical engineer
    Novelty, OH
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    You can, of course, buy a totally independent electronic carillon to strike whatever hours you want. In 1996, I restored a E. Howard roundtop for a courthouse. The clock hadn't run in 20 years and someone from the village in the 1970s donated funds for a carillon. When we restored the clock, the county engineers didn't want the bell to strike because they thought it would shake the mortar out of the brick joints. So the clock runs mechanically, and the electronic carillon strikes the hours and chimes the quarter-hours.

    Frank
     
  3. Les harland

    Les harland Registered User

    Apr 10, 2008
    1,317
    95
    48
    Male
    Hertfordshire England
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #3 Les harland, Jul 25, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2019
    A lot of English Church clocks have a simple system where the hammer is pulled away from the bell when striking is not wanted
    Most towers use one the bells used for change ringing, usually the tenor ( heaviest bell) as the clock bell
    If the clock tried to strike whilst the bell was being rung the bell wpould be destroyed
    In change ringing the bell starts mouth upwards and swings full circle and then back again
    One circle per ring

    If any one is interested how English Church bells work there is a good post on Youtube

     
  4. flynwill

    flynwill Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 1, 2007
    1,024
    7
    38
    Rolling Hills Estates, CA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Indeed you could probably build something with off-the-shelf parts for most of the complicated bits. A linear actuator to actually engage/dis-engage the hammer from the bell, a controller of some sort and a timer.
     
  5. Les harland

    Les harland Registered User

    Apr 10, 2008
    1,317
    95
    48
    Male
    Hertfordshire England
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    That sounds complicated
    Most Church towers use a bit of thin rope to pull the hammer away
    It has a ring or loop at the other end which goes over a bolt or hook in the ringing chamber
    This system has worked well for about two hundred years
     
    pidragos likes this.
  6. flynwill

    flynwill Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 1, 2007
    1,024
    7
    38
    Rolling Hills Estates, CA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Nothing complicated about it it's the same system, just automated. The linear actuator pulls the same rope pulling at whatever hour the chimes should stop and lets it go the following morning.
    There's probably dozen's of other way to implement it as well.
     
  7. Clockwise123

    Clockwise123 Registered User

    Jun 18, 2019
    23
    4
    3
    Male
    Country Flag:
    A night-time silencing device would be perfect for this application. effectively the clock continues to strike with the hammer being pulled away from the bell at a set time for a certain number of hours. This can all be completed with no permanent changes to the movement. These are now a frequent installation in the UK most of the major turret clock maintainers offer such devices.
     
  8. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Mar 1, 2016
    260
    28
    28
    North Carolina
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I'm dealing with the same requests on our Hotchkiss restoration. The building has a theater in it now and they don't want it to ring during performances or at night. Looking at mechanical options, or simply sliding a thick pad between the hammer and bell using a solenoid and a simple linkage.

    Following along!
     

Share This Page