lever pivot polishing

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by mrpat2, Dec 2, 2019.

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  1. mrpat2

    mrpat2 Registered User

    Aug 17, 2018
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    As I gain more experience in clock repair, I now find it necessary to restore the pivots on the levers of a clock. Specifically a sessions mantel clock, t&s movement. Im comfortable now with rebushing and polishing the wheel pivots with the lathe but how does one restore the lever pivots? If they just need a twist of fine emery cloth by hand that would be ok but these have some rough surfaces and need to be turned down and maybe rebushed, but what is the proper way to do that? I cant chuck them up in the lathe at least on one end because the levers get in the way if they were to spin around. Another question: Where can I purchase the staking tools that I see how wheels are assembled to pivots? Seems like a larger diameter 4 pin hollow tool of some sort.
    Thanks in advance for your insight.
     
  2. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
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    Lever pivots usually don't require a lot of work. They do not rotate and are not in the power train, so as long as they are not too sloppy and are clean they should be OK. If you want to polish these pivots a wool wheel in a Dremel tool charged with polishing compound will work.

    RC
     
  3. mrpat2

    mrpat2 Registered User

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    Thanks Ill try that. What do you use for staking tools?
     
  4. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    Agreed, the pivots don't really need polishing just a good cleaning as suggested by RC. They also should not be oiled. They should move freely and have a slight amount of side play. Unless you are doing a lot of clock wheel and arbor staking the cost of buying a clock staking tool set would expensive and not be very practical cost wise. Staking clock wheels and parts is a subject well covered on this MB. You can search the subject by using the hour glass symbol at the top right cornor of this page. Enter "wheel staking" and you will get about 10 pages of postings on the subject.
     
  5. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    I've never found the need to purchase an expensive set of staking tools. It really depends on just what I intend to stake, I just grind something to the shape I need for that task. Some time ago Lowe's had a special on a six-pack of nail sets, I bought two. The "handle" part is hex so I put them in the 3-jaw lathe chuck and turn them down to what I need. For small stakes I drill a piece of 1/4" steel rod and insert a piece of tempered steel pivot wire.

    RC
     
  6. mrpat2

    mrpat2 Registered User

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    heres what I got for lever pivot condition. Looks a bit scored. Just bothers me a bit to put that in a movement without some kind of polishing/restoration

    lever pivots.jpg
     
  7. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    I would start with a two hour bath in evapo-rust and then do some steel wool work... finished off w some 4” round brass wire buffing wheel polishing... including the pivots. the evapo-rust will remove the rust but leave a dark gray color... the brass wheel will make it shiny again.

    you could then hand work the pivots with some 2000 grit wet/dry paper... just enough to remove and smooth a bit. tear a half inch by 2 inch rectangle and wrap and roll around each pivot...

    I don’t think it’s worth disassembling just so you can turn them in a lathe
     
    Bradford Needham likes this.
  8. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Removing the machine marks will make your pivot smaller, not good. They've been like that from the start and don't need 'fixing'. So, I would leave them alone. A steel brush, in the ole Dremell, will take care of that light rust. A trace of oil and your done.

    If anything on a lever needs work it's usually at the ends. The count finger tip is often grooved. The stop lever's tip can be rounded over. The lever that rides on the maintenance wheel is often grooved. The 'J ' hook often needs to be adjusted for a correct drop point, etc.

    Willie X
     
  9. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    Rockin Ronnie likes this.
  10. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
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    For rust I use a mini sand blaster with a grit of 320 to 12000. It will clean rust dirt, grime down to bare metal. It also cleans inside lantern pinions and other tight places where nothing else can get to it. I then apply a coat of Ospho (a rust remover and inhibitor). No oil, its a magnet for dirt.
     

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