Let's see everyone's favorite watch or movement they own.

PatH

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Welcome to the Forums!

This is a great topic for a thread. What makes this one your favorite? And for those who aren't familiar with the B.W. Raymonds, perhaps you could include the maker?
 

jjimmerson417

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Welcome to the Forums!

This is a great topic for a thread. What makes this one your favorite? And for those who aren't familiar with the B.W. Raymonds, perhaps you could include the maker?
Well for starters I don't own that many yet so not many to choose from. Im new to watches as well so I don't know a whole lot of internals or special features. But it was made during ww2 which is one of reasons. Im really here to learn what I can about these time pieces. But I don't want to just troll and read posts. I want to interact where and when I can. Do you know anything about this watch? And what's your favorite piece you own?
 
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jjimmerson417

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Welcome to the Forums!

This is a great topic for a thread. What makes this one your favorite? And for those who aren't familiar with the B.W. Raymonds, perhaps you could include the maker?
And I don't trust everything on the internet but pocket watch data base said 8,000 made. So if this is true that's a plus. I bought a beat up movement to tinker with before I ever touch anything rare or working lol
 

Rick Hufnagel

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Welcome to the forums!

Hard to go wrong with a good quality Elgin there! Glad to see a new poster. The monometallic balance and alloy hairspring is what makes the 590 a nice BWR in it's time. It's predecessors in the lineup had bimetallic balances and steel hairsprings. I'm sure the awesome railroad watch collectors here can give you a much better explanation.

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This early Elgin stemwinder is my favorite. Stemwind production started in 1873 and this was among the ones sold in the first year. No lever set, you still adjust the time with a key.

Good luck, enjoy your watch and learning all about it!
 

jjimmerson417

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Welcome to the forums!

Hard to go wrong with a good quality Elgin there! Glad to see a new poster. The monometallic balance and alloy hairspring is what makes the 590 a nice BWR in it's time. It's predecessors in the lineup had bimetallic balances and steel hairsprings. I'm sure the awesome railroad watch collectors here can give you a much better explanation.

View attachment 646678
View attachment 646679
This early Elgin stemwinder is my favorite. Stemwind production started in 1873 and this was among the ones sold in the first year. No lever set, you still adjust the time with a key.

Good luck, enjoy your watch and learning all about it!
Nice watch I just picked up an 1880 HH Taylor. I've been a little over board on buying watches recently. I'm infatuated with these time pieces. That's why im here to learn learn learn. I want to eventually work on them myself. And restore history.

20220522_103110.jpg 20220522_103020.jpg
 

Rick Hufnagel

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Nice watch I just picked up an 1880 HH Taylor. I've been a little over board on buying watches recently. I'm infatuated with these time pieces. That's why im here to learn learn learn. I want to eventually work on them myself. And restore history.

View attachment 710286 View attachment 710287
Cool movement.

The grades 79(key) and 80 (stem) are the updated versions of the H.H. Taylor. They can also be just marked "Elgin Nat'l Watch Co." Instead of the name. Originally the HH Taylor ticked at 16,200 bph. Sometime between late 1879 and 1882 Elgin kicked it up to 18,000 BPH, which is where your watch grade comes in. There are no quick train Taylors in the 1879 material catalog, but there is a notation in the 1882 about how they now make quick train Taylors and Wheelers. So, your estimate of 1880(ish) is a safe bet.

The one I showed above is also an H.H. Taylor but the slow train version (16,200 beats per hour). In later catalogs it's called a grade 20.
 
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jjimmerson417

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Cool movement.

The grades 79(key) and 80 (stem) are the updated versions of the H.H. Taylor. They can also be just marked "Elgin Nat'l Watch Co." Instead of the name. Originally the HH Taylor ticked at 16,200 bph. Sometime between late 1879 and 1882 Elgin kicked it up to 18,000 BPH, which is where your watch grade comes in. There are no quick train Taylors in the 1879 material catalog, but there is a notation in the 1882 about how they now make quick train Taylors and Wheelers. So, your estimate of 1880(ish) is a safe bet.

The one I showed above is also an H.H. Taylor but the slow train version (16,200 beats per hour). In later catalogs it's called a grade 20.
Yeah it is ticking fast. Thank you so much for sharing your nice watch and your knowledge with me. Speaking of wheeler's I did pick up this 3fb. Working on case and stuff for it. Any info you may have on this would be great too. Thank again

20220515_095517.jpg
 

musicguy

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Welcome to the NAWCC Forum


Rob
 
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Rick Hufnagel

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jjimmerson417

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Yeah it is ticking fast. Thank you so much for sharing your nice watch and your knowledge with me. Speaking of wheeler's I did pick up this 3fb. Working on case and stuff for it. Any info you may have on this would be great too. Thank again

View attachment 710288
Yeah it is ticking fast. Thank you so much for sharing your nice watch and your knowledge with me. Speaking of wheeler's I did pick up this 3fb. Working on case and stuff for it. Any info you may have on this would be great too. Thank again

View attachment 710288
Heres better pictures. Sorry my camera stinks.

20220522_205954.jpg 20220522_205717.jpg 20220522_205753.jpg
 

jjimmerson417

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Ah, those are nice. Not something I'm too familiar with, but it's a good full jeweled movement adjusted to temperature.

IIRC it's a grade 338. Pendant set. Model 7.
Here are a few listings on PWDB.
Thank you for the help again and the link.
 

PatH

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And what's your favorite piece you own?

I'm primarily an early dollar watch collector, so you won't see fine movements as found in your beautiful B. W. Raymond.:)

It's hard for me to narrow down my favorite, since I have many, each for a different reason. One of my favorites is the Benedict & Burnham (parent company of Waterbury Watch Company) long-wind watch. These watches paved the way for pocket timepieces that were affordable to everyday people. They have a 9-ft spring and a very innovative movement with very few parts - IIRC there are 54 parts including the case. It takes 75 full turns, or 150 half turns to fully wind the watch. The third picture shows the mainspring in a later version of the watch (Series C). The spring is not attached to the arbor, but you get an idea of the size of the spring.

DSC04005.JPG DSC04013.JPG Waterbury watch C spring 2.JPG
 

BillyHelbender

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I'm primarily an early dollar watch collector, so you won't see fine movements as found in your beautiful B. W. Raymond.:)
Dude that watch is totally Awespme!!

My favorite is my First!! a Waltham 18s 1883 AT&Co grade. This is the watch that got me into these awesome timepieces and was found in my Mothers trash after she went through some clutter!! It looks better and has two hands now after being serviced!

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jjimmerson417

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I'm primarily an early dollar watch collector, so you won't see fine movements as found in your beautiful B. W. Raymond.:)

It's hard for me to narrow down my favorite, since I have many, each for a different reason. One of my favorites is the Benedict & Burnham (parent company of Waterbury Watch Company) long-wind watch. These watches paved the way for pocket timepieces that were affordable to everyday people. They have a 9-ft spring and a very innovative movement with very few parts - IIRC there are 54 parts including the case. It takes 75 full turns, or 150 half turns to fully wind the watch. The third picture shows the mainspring in a later version of the watch (Series C). The spring is not attached to the arbor, but you get an idea of the size of the spring.

View attachment 710293 View attachment 710294 View attachment 710295
I love the skeleton see through dials
I'm primarily an early dollar watch collector, so you won't see fine movements as found in your beautiful B. W. Raymond.:)

It's hard for me to narrow down my favorite, since I have many, each for a different reason. One of my favorites is the Benedict & Burnham (parent company of Waterbury Watch Company) long-wind watch. These watches paved the way for pocket timepieces that were affordable to everyday people. They have a 9-ft spring and a very innovative movement with very few parts - IIRC there are 54 parts including the case. It takes 75 full turns, or 150 half turns to fully wind the watch. The third picture shows the mainspring in a later version of the watch (Series C). The spring is not attached to the arbor, but you get an idea of the size of the spring.

View attachment 710293 View attachment 710294 View attachment 710295
Love skeleton see through dials and that back cover is fantastic. Is that a key wind in the illuminati hole? The all setting eye watch.
 

Ethan Lipsig

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I wonder how many collectors would keep adding watches to their collections after they had a clear favorite, a quandary I've never had to face after getting my second pocket watch.

I've never ranked my watches. I don't intend to do that. If I ever did, I'd likely rank them in these categories:
  1. Issue-free watches I love
  2. Watches with issues that I nevertheless love
  3. Watches I like that enhance my collections
  4. Watches I like that I bought on a whim
  5. Watches with serious issues being restored by watchmakers
  6. Watches I regret buying that I am in the process of unloading
I have a dozen or more category 1 watches and as many or more category 2 watches. (I see issues these days that I did recognize when I was a novice collector.)

I have more category 3 watches than category 1 & 2 watches.

I don't have many category 4 watches; they tend to migrate to category 6.

Presently ten watches in my collection are being worked on by three watchmakers. Three of them are category 5 watches that probably are unrestorable. If so, they will drop into presently-vacant category 6. Nothing stays in that category very long.
 

PatH

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Is that a key wind in the illuminati hole?
These watches are stem wind, hands are set from the front by removing the bezel/crystal and moving the hands around with your finger, so no key holes.
 

jjimmerson417

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These watches are stem wind, hands are set from the front by removing the bezel/crystal and moving the hands around with your finger, so no key holes.
I like it, I don't know to much about watches yet. So I started with American rr but I'm sure I'll be buying others in the future.
 

Clint Geller

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If we are talking solely about movements, I have about eight absolute favorites, all of them Walthams, that I would find it nearly impossible to choose between, and there are another half dozen or so movements which are only half a step back. If we are talking about complete watches, then provenances come into play, and the question becomes even more hopeless for me.

Here are my eight favorite movements. In order of serial number, they are:

1. First Run AWCo Grade KW20, SN 50,042, Nashua assembly # 163, 19 jewels in a unique configuration, sdjs, exposed stopwork, distinctive winged center wheel escutcheon, approximately 16K Chas. E. Hale & Co. eagle-marked hunting case
2. AWCo Grade KW20, SN 150,024, Stratton's barrel and Fogg's vibrating hairspring stud, Breguet hairspring, exposed stopwork, one of 2 known 21 jewel examples and possibly the earliest 21 jewel American watch, 18K Celestine Jacot & Bro. hunting case.
3. AWCo Grade KW20, SN 250,456, 19 jewels, super-fine pitched Breguet hairspring, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, gold train and center wheel jewel setting, large diameter balance wheel, curb pin adjusting screw on regulator for isochronism adjustment, chronometer style timing nuts, perfect 3 line signature glass enamel dial, 18K AWCo hunting case.
4. AWCo Grade KW16, SN 501,586, 19 jewels, brilliant nickel damaskeening, gold train and sdjs, unusual flat hairspring, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, chronometer style timing nuts, 18K AWCo hunting case.
5. First Run AWCo Grade Model 1872, SN 670,095, 18 jewels, nail set, Breguet hairspring, curb pin adjusting screw on regulator for isochronism adjustment, gold dome, gold train and sdjs, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, timing nuts, 3 line signature glass enamel dial, one of three movements cited for outstanding performance at the 1876 timing trials in Philadelphia and the Detroit Observatory, 18K AWCo hunting case with Fitch's nail setting patent marking.
6. Third Run AWCo Grade Model 1872, SN 999,960, 21 jewels, Breguet hairspring, gold dome, gold train and sdjs, Woerd's patent sawtooth compensating balance, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, 3 line signature glass enamel dial, 18K AWCo hunting case.
7. AWCo Grade Model 1872, SN 2,788,058, 21 jewels, Breguet hairspring, gold train and sdjs, marked "NONMAGNETIC" double roller nonmagnetic escapement, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, Gothic AWCo glass enamel dial, 18K AWCo hunting case.
8. Private label AWCo Grade Model 1872, SN 3,349,025 circa 1891, signed "William Moir, New York," 21 jewels, Breguet hairspring, gold train and sdjs, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, double sunk glass enamel Gothic AWWCo dial, 18K AWWCo hunting case
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4thdimension

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If we are talking solely about movements, I have about eight absolute favorites, all of them Walthams, that I would find it nearly impossible to choose between, and there are another half dozen or so movements which are only half a step back. If we are talking about complete watches, then provenances come into play, and the question becomes even more hopeless for me.

Here are my eight favorite movements. In order of serial number, they are:

1. First Run AWCo Grade KW20, SN 50,042, Nashua assembly # 163, 19 jewels, sdjs, exposed stopwork, distinctive winged center wheel escutcheon, approximately 16K Chas. E. Hale & Co. eagle-marked hunting case
2. AWCo Grade KW20, SN 150,024, Stratton's barrel and Fogg's vibrating hairspring stud, Breguet hairspring, exposed stopwork, one of 2 known 21 jewel examples and possibly the earliest 21 jewel American watch, 18K Celestine Jacot & Bro. hunting case.
3. AWCo Grade KW20, SN 250,456, 19 jewels, super-fine pitched Breguet hairspring, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, gold train and center wheel jewel setting, large diameter balance wheel, curb pin adjusting screw on regulator for isochronism adjustment, chronometer style timing nuts, perfect 3 line signature glass enamel dial, 18K AWCo hunting case.
4. AWCo Grade KW16, SN 501,586, 19 jewels, brilliant nickel damaskeening, gold train and sdjs, unusual flat hairspring, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, chronometer style timing nuts, 18K AWCo hunting case.
5. First Run AWCo Grade Model 1872, SN 670,095, 18 jewels, nail set, Breguet hairspring, curb pin adjusting screw on regulator for isochronism adjustment, gold dome, gold train and sdjs, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, timing nuts, 3 line signature glass enamel dial, one of three movements cited for outstanding performance at the 1876 timing trials in Philadelphia and the Detroit Observatory, 18K AWCo hunting case with Fitch's nail setting patent marking.
6. Third Run AWCo Grade Model 1872, SN 999,960, 21 jewels, Breguet hairspring, gold dome, gold train and sdjs, Woerd's patent sawtooth compensating balance, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, 3 line signature glass enamel dial, 18K AWCo hunting case.
7. AWCo Grade Model 1872, SN 2,788,058, 21 jewels, Breguet hairspring, gold train and sdjs, marked "NONMAGNETIC" double roller nonmagnetic escapement, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, Gothic AWCo glass enamel dial, 18K AWCo hunting case.
8. Private label AWCo Grade Model 1872, SN 3,349,025 circa 1891, signed "William Moir, New York," 21 jewels, Breguet hairspring, gold train and sdjs, Fogg's patent cam regulator and safety pinion, double sunk glass enamel Gothic AWWCo dial, 18K AWWCo hunting case
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Clint, All great watches but #8 William Moir is near pornographic! I’ve never seen demascening taken to that extreme before.-Cort
 

Jerry Treiman

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If we are talking solely about movements, I have about eight absolute favorites, all of them Walthams, that I would find it nearly impossible to choose between, and there are another half dozen or so movements which are only half a step back.
Like Clint, I find it very difficult to choose a favorite movement, but at least for today I think I would choose this one. It is a special-order Waltham Colonial Series movement with 23 jewels, including diamond cap jewels at the balance and escape wheel. The winding wheels have a soft satin finish seen only their highest quality movements, and all of the parts, including the gold gear train, are finished to the same level. The movement was finished around 1913 for, and cased by, H.W. Matalene (owner of the "Patrician" trademark). Like Waltham's Premier Maximus it did not need fancy damaskeening.
17051813mobl2.jpg

I probably first saw this watch in the 1970s and, after many years of gentle pestering, the previous owner sold it to me in 1997.
 

Tom McIntyre

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Thank you so much for showing this beauty. One of my fond recollections of the Chattanooga National Meeting was getting a close look at those examples. Rather than derail this thread, I went back and read the previous thread https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/ball-watch-co-straight-line-watches.115555.
Sorry that the reference in that thread to the Symposium is lost but it is available on the WayBack machine Welcome to the American Watch Company web
 
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PatH

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WHAT
ARE
THESE?!?!
o_Oo_Oo_O
I didn't know either - check out the links in Tom McIntyre's post for some very interesting reading.

Thank you so much for showing this beauty. One of my fond recollections of the Chattanooga National Meeting was getting a close look at those examples. Rather than derail this thread, I went back and read the previous thread https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/ball-watch-co-straight-line-watches.115555.
Sorry that the reference in that thread to the Symposium is lost but it is available on the WayBack machine Welcome to the American Watch Company web
 
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musicguy

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