Lathe collet sizing

Discussion in 'Horological Tools' started by Lefpanhorf, Apr 15, 2020.

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  1. Lefpanhorf

    Lefpanhorf Registered User
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    Sep 22, 2018
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    Was wondering if anyone has or knows where I could get a chart of Peerless lathe collet work holding sizes.
     
  2. DeweyC

    DeweyC Registered User
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    Feb 5, 2007
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    Peerless were made in the same size runs as the other collet makes. 1/100 mm to 50/100 mm. I do think they sold a branded faceplate, and centers. I do not know if they branded the moveable jaw chucks.
     
  3. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

    Mar 29, 2011
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    Did you get the sizes right ? The standard range for 8 mm collets is size 2 (0.2 mm) to size 60 (6 mm), some makes also go up to 80 (8 mm), but these have only a shallow bore in the head. Typical sets start at size 3 in steps of 0.1 mm up to size 12 and then in steps of 0.2 mm (even numbers) to size 50. More complete sets have both even and uneven numbers, but uneven numbers above 11 tend to be quite rare.

    There are also larger collets with extended heads from number 60 to number 140 (14 mm), sometimes called crown-chucks, but I don't know, whether Peerless offered them. They also tend to be quite rare.
     
  4. Dushan Grujich

    Dushan Grujich Registered User

    Jun 20, 2003
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    G'Day!

    Many lathe makers have also offered collets in sizes 1-10 with half step 0.05 mm.

    Cheers, Dushan
     
  5. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

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    Actually, I only have come across one x.x5 mm-sized collet so far and this seems to be close to an imperial size, namely size 15.5 which would be very close to 1/16".

    Many collets for German-made lathes seem to have come from a supplier called Julius Ortlieb & Cie. GmbH (which still is in business) and I have a 1940s catalogue by them that lists collets for all major German and Swiss lathe manufacturers. They state that collets are made in 0.1 mm steps, but that normally a set in 0.2 mm steps is sufficient.

    Talking about imperial size collets: in most cases a metric size in 0.2 mm steps is close enough: 1/64" = 0.4 mm, 1/32" = 0.8 mm, 3/32" = 2.4 mm, 1/8" = 3.2 mm, 3/16 = 4.8 mm, 1/4" = 6.4 mm. The odd one out, where 5/100 could make a difference is the mentioned 1/16" = 1.55 mm. I believe that the German collets destined for the US American market were just stamped differently.
     
  6. DeweyC

    DeweyC Registered User
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    At this stage of the game, I suspect Wefalk is pretty close to reality on the 2/100mm increments. I was lucky enough to buy a complete Levin setup years ago when everyone thought mechanical watches were dead. There were a number of setups sold by "gentlemen machinists" who rarely used them and when they did they treated them like a treasured toy.

    In the ensuing years everything has been mashed up. A lathe matched at the factory is near impossible to find, let alone a complete set of unabused collets.

    One big aid will be learning to use a brass faceplate with shellac. And turning staffs and arbors in one holding.

    If someone is planning on long career in making parts then I highly recommend they spend money on good instruction and then save money for probably a new Horia or Vectra setup.

    I also see nothing wrong with a complete boxed Boley or Lorch Geneva pattern lathe either. Like all machine tools, if the set is complete then it is likely the user knew how to use it.

    A WW will not be useful for making many tools a watchmaker will make. And besides the cost of "real" WW attachments for milling wheels and pinions, the Sherline Mill with the Mumford indexer is better and far cheaper.

    When the time comes for a heavier lathe, there are plenty of Hardinge, Southbend lathes that have been restored as well as Schaublin and Habegger. But the jump to a 10mm or even a 12 mm collet lathe can cost as much as these larger lathes and do not afford a great deal over the 8mm ww. It is a matter of space though (and relocating).

    Good equipment does exist. It is just in the hands of people who aren't done using it.
     
  7. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

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    DeweyC, it’s actually 2/10 mm, not 2/100 mm ...

    I do own a number-matched Lorch, Schmidt & Co. WW-pattern lathe, though the collets for it are a bit of a rag-bag, particularly the uneven and larger numbers. Dito, I have a Wolf, Jahn & Co. D-bed lathe as evidently original set, though the parts of D-bed are not normally numbered. Its collets and some other parts were hardly used. It came from a watchmaker in Nottingham/UK. All this was bought between 15 and 32 years ago - since then such sets have become incredibly expensive.
     
  8. DeweyC

    DeweyC Registered User
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    Oops. Thanks for the correction.
     

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