Large J Hargreaves Movement

Discussion in 'European & Other Pocket Watches' started by Britannicus, May 22, 2019.

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  1. Britannicus

    Britannicus Registered User

    Apr 26, 2016
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    #1 Britannicus, May 22, 2019
    Last edited: May 22, 2019
    I just picked up what I thought was a pocket watch movement - though it seems a tad large at 49.5 (ish) mm diameter. I'm guessing a size 24 ? - it's a bit bigger than an 18 - but I'm a trifle baffled by how to go about winding it. Before I try to dismantle it - I'd like to try to understand the movement a bit. I'm a very raw amateur so need some guidance

    In principle there is a crown wheel - which in turn winds the barrel - shown here sideways on. Now I'd expect if this was the case that a winding stem at 90 degrees would be part of the case, but I can't see any sort of hole where I'd expect the pivot of the winding stem to go.

    The movement winds and runs if I use a thumbnail to wind the crown wheel clockwise (is looking at the face side of the movement) - but clearly there's another piece missing - any ideas how a winding stem would have fitted

    There is also a small lever at the 3 position - I'm assuming this is a chronograph lever to stop the second hand, but no idea how that might work

    As always your insight would be most welcome


    Winding wheel notes  .png





    P_20190522_111827.jpg P_20190522_112000.jpg P_20190522_112029.jpg P_20190522_112051.jpg P_20190522_112118.jpg Winding wheel close up .gif
     
  2. SKennedy

    SKennedy Registered User

    Jan 5, 2017
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    This is a common form of English keyless winding. There is nothing missing. The winding stem is attached to the case being a close fit to the inner hole of the pendant so that there is no sideways play and very little end play too. It ends with a matching crown wheel/bevel gear that meshes with the one in the movement when fitted into the case. There's not really any 'easy' way of winding these outside of a case other than with your thumbnail as you have done or a piece of pegwood or similar to push the winding wheel wound. You have to be careful not to break teeth. The vertical steel post to the right of the winding wheel in your photos is what is pushed in by the pinset pin in the case to set the hands. If there is another lever at '3' then that is probably attached to a 'balance brake' which stops the watch to enable a simple chronograph function. This will probably make more sense once you take the dial off for a look.
     
  3. Dr. Jon

    Dr. Jon Registered User
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    Not much to add but there is a slightly easier way to wind the watch movement The winding is often under the dial and you can wind by turning this wheel with a stick of peg wood. The click is usually available under the dial to let it down.

    The watch is not a chronograph but rather a hack watch. When you stop it the entire movement stops.
     
  4. Britannicus

    Britannicus Registered User

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    Thanks gentlemen - informative as ever :)
     
  5. Chris Radek

    Chris Radek Registered User
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    Apr 13, 2014
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    Cased, these are just massive. They are directly driven sweep seconds, so the very long sweep hand moves very precisely, and is lovely to see operate.
     

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