L and J Frisbie Co Clock - Chittenango NY

timmwill

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Apr 7, 2022
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Hi everyone,'
I have come into possession of a clock with the name of L and J Frisbie inside. i know nothing about clocks but are just trying to reassemble it so it can be displayed in the local Historical Museum. So it doesn't need to actually work but we would like to put it all back together. Does anyone have any type of information that would show how it goes back together.It has two large weights appear to go to the top of the clock. See some photos below.
Thanks for any help you can give us!!

IMG-4648.jpg IMG-4649.jpg IMG-4650.jpg IMG-4651.jpg IMG-4652.jpg IMG-4653.jpg
 

Steven Thornberry

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Since this is a wood movement clock, I will move this thread to the Wood Movement Clocks forum where it should receive better replies.
 

James Gardner

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Apr 5, 2010
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Timmwell,

Since you are not going to have the clock running, rather just for display, you can place the weights in the bottom of the case and not suspend them from the cords. If you want to give me your address I can mail you a short history of this clock firm complied by Russell Oechsle. As far as attaching the movement to the clock, you will see the four circular openings on the corners of the movement. If you look closely, you will see a small hole going from the outside of edge of wood movement plate. Find yourself 3 narrow 1" or 1 1/2" finishing nails that fit snugly in these 3 holes. You will have to experiment to see what size works best. You will find 3 corresponding holes in the side of the wooden slats that hold the movement in the case. The nails go through the outside slat hole inward and through the movement hole to hold the movement in place. By the way, the clock movement is by Jeromes and Darrow of Bristol, CT. Some NYS makers imported movements from Connecticut makers and made their own cases. Others imported the whole clocks and put their pasted their own labels into the clock, and yes, there were NYS makers that made both their own movements and cases. The clock you have is a nice NYS example worthy of museum display!
 

PatH

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Here is an older thread about Frisbie - unfortunately, no pictures of the movement, but it does include some information about the company and the group who probably made the movement.

This one appears to picture a movement like yours

Others who are knowledgeable of wood movement clocks will likely be along shortly to provide additional insight on the proper set up.

Perhaps a moderator can change the spelling in the title of this thread so it will pull up in future searches.

Edit: it looks like James was responding while I was typing.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
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Hi everyone,'
I have come into possession of a clock with the name of L and J Frisbee inside. i know nothing about clocks but are just trying to reassemble it so it can be displayed in the local Historical Museum. So it doesn't need to actually work but we would like to put it all back together. Does anyone have any type of information that would show how it goes back together.It has two large weights appear to go to the top of the clock. See some photos below.
Thanks for any help you can give us!!

View attachment 704047 View attachment 704048 View attachment 704049 View attachment 704050 View attachment 704051 View attachment 704052
Looks pretty nice.

A pic of the clock’s door & dial would be nice.

Mr. Oeschle has been mentioned. He & Helen Boyce wrote a wonderful book, “An Empire in Time”, an excellent reference about Upstate NY makers (many were actually assemblers of components made by others).

RM
 

timmwill

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Apr 7, 2022
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Timmwell,

Since you are not going to have the clock running, rather just for display, you can place the weights in the bottom of the case and not suspend them from the cords. If you want to give me your address I can mail you a short history of this clock firm complied by Russell Oechsle. As far as attaching the movement to the clock, you will see the four circular openings on the corners of the movement. If you look closely, you will see a small hole going from the outside of edge of wood movement plate. Find yourself 3 narrow 1" or 1 1/2" finishing nails that fit snugly in these 3 holes. You will have to experiment to see what size works best. You will find 3 corresponding holes in the side of the wooden slats that hold the movement in the case. The nails go through the outside slat hole inward and through the movement hole to hold the movement in place. By the way, the clock movement is by Jeromes and Darrow of Bristol, CT. Some NYS makers imported movements from Connecticut makers and made their own cases. Others imported the whole clocks and put their pasted their own labels into the clock, and yes, there were NYS makers that made both their own movements and cases. The clock you have is a nice NYS example worthy of museum display!
Thank you very much for all the information I sent you my mailing address.
 

timmwill

Registered User
Apr 7, 2022
6
0
1
71
Country
Looks pretty nice.

A pic of the clock’s door & dial would be nice.

Mr. Oeschle has been mentioned. He & Helen Boyce wrote a wonderful book, “An Empire in Time”, an excellent reference about Upstate NY makers (many were actually assemblers of components made by others).

RM
I have attached a couple more photos!

IMG-4655.jpg IMG-4656.jpg
 

timmwill

Registered User
Apr 7, 2022
6
0
1
71
Country
Here is an older thread about Frisbie - unfortunately, no pictures of the movement, but it does include some information about the company and the group who probably made the movement.

This one appears to picture a movement like yours

Others who are knowledgeable of wood movement clocks will likely be along shortly to provide additional insight on the proper set up.

Perhaps a moderator can change the spelling in the title of this thread so it will pull up in future searches.

Edit: it looks like James was responding while I was typing.
Looks very similar to ours ! Thank you.
 

G. Russell Oechsle

NAWCC Star Fellow
Jun 7, 2010
9
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Hi everyone,'
I have come into possession of a clock with the name of L and J Frisbie inside. i know nothing about clocks but are just trying to reassemble it so it can be displayed in the local Historical Museum. So it doesn't need to actually work but we would like to put it all back together. Does anyone have any type of information that would show how it goes back together.It has two large weights appear to go to the top of the clock. See some photos below.
Thanks for any help you can give us!!

View attachment 704047 View attachment 704048 View attachment 704049 View attachment 704050 View attachment 704051 View attachment 704052
Looks like a nice restorable clock! I can supply pictures of similar clocks to assist in the process. Drop me a note at russoechsle@gmail.com. Both Levi and James came from Wolcott, CT, both involved in the clock business; by the late 1820s James was in Camden, NY just northeast of Chittenango. They apparently decided that buying perhaps a few hundred clocks from Jeromes & Darrow and re-labling them with local labels was a good marketing plan. It appears that the clocks were sold between 1831 and 32. Chittenango was on the Erie Canal, so that gave them a depot from which to operate. Regards, Russ
 
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