L’epee musical pocket watch replacement parts HELP!

Discussion in 'European & Other Pocket Watches' started by Icarus723, Nov 1, 2019.

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  1. Icarus723

    Icarus723 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2019
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    Im fairly new to watch repair so please forgive terminology and if this post is in the wrong category.

    I just recently came across this Swiss L’epee musical pocket watch. 65mm diameter with open escapement.

    There are a couple of wheels that govern the musical movement that have broken pivots. I’m pretty sure replacement parts are impossible to locate short of purchasing another one of these as a parts watch. I was hoping someone could direct me to a resource for any company that would be willing to cut me some wheels. Or possibly any long time professionals on here that are in possession of a wheel cutting engine that is willing to work for hire.

    The two wheels that are needed are quite small. The first is 9mm across with .7mm teeth. The second is appx 7mm across. If you see in the fourth photo it is the wheel that is attached to the end of the music barrel and the following wheel it contacts. I have been looking into replacing with parts from Swiss musical movements but I was hoping to do this the right way before I resort to anything too drastic.

    Any help is, as always, greatly appreciated.

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  2. Icarus723

    Icarus723 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2019
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    So, just reading over my post it looks like I neglected to mention. It’s the wheel at the end of the barrel that is missing teeth. The following wheel has a broken pivot.

    just learned today I can drill out the broken pivot and replace it. So i will try that after some practice runs on spares, but still need the wheel with missing teeth replaced unless there is a repair I don’t know about that would help in this case. Please educate.

    Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
     
  3. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Icarus723,

    If the wheel only had a couple of teeth missing it would be possible to splice in replacements, but it's clear that all the teeth are badly bent, so the only remedy is a new wheel. The replacement of the broken pivot is a common repair, which does, as you say, involve drilling a hole down the arbor and fitting a new pivot, but to do this with any hope of maintaining concentricity you need a lathe or micro mill.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  4. Icarus723

    Icarus723 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2019
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    I have a jewelers lathe and a .3mm drill bit that should do the trick. Thanks for confirming that’s possible.

    As for the wheel missing teeth...when you say splice...does that process work like it sounds? I.e. remove the wheel, cut out the broken teeth and mend in a new section. At that point I should be able to saw sand and file down to the desired teeth length width and pitch I suppose. How would you permanently affix the new splice? Welding? Solder?

    Thanks for the recommendation. Eager to learn more about this method.
     
  5. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Icarus723,

    The important part is getting the drill to run true exactly in the centre of the arbor. A member here, Jerry Kieffer, has posted some techniques for approaching this. If the setup is not spot on, you run the risk of breaking the drill in the arbor, then comes the interesting exercise of removing the broken piece!

    This procedure is feasible if only a very few teeth are damaged, but in this case it looks as though all the teeth are bent, so a new wheel is the only answer. However, what you describe is broadly how it would work, with a new section of brass, either plain or cut from a donor wheel of the same diameter and tooth pitch, let into the damaged area, possibly with a dovetail to aid location, and then hard soldered in place. If it's a plain piece of brass, the teeth then have to be cut to match the rest.

    Regards,

    Graham
     

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