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KWM Bushing tool no Instructions

binman

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Nov 16, 2011
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Brought second hand but no instructions with it. Would any body care to email a copy. I would be extremely grateful, many thanks Richard at richard1944@virginmedia.com
 

binman

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I was able to down load from the web. and get other questions ansewered as well.
 

DeweyC

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Feb 5, 2007
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I looked this after reading it was available as a PDF. For what it is worth, the instructions do not describe the ART of centering the worn hole; you have to judge which side to bias the towards based on the way the pivot is pushed by the force of the train.


Here is the link:

http://www.beco-professionals.com/images/product_media/306070_en.pdf



 
Last edited:

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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What Dew mentions is sometimes called 'nibbling'. That word aptly describes this action of the cutter. You push down and cut in little strokes, exactly in the areas where material needs to be removed. You can practice this on old discarded plates. If they have stamped oil sinks you can use this as a good guide for your 'nibbling'. In the absence of an oil sink, you can make a little marking scribe. This little tool will scribe a tiny circle to show you where the old center is before you start cutting.

It is very important to start off, like you are starting, with the purpose of maintaining the old center as your goal. Many folks falsely assume that the strength of the tool will force the tool to the correct place. Nothing could be further from the truth. The KWM tool has a little extra slop at the quick-change bit attachment knuckle. This is not a detriment to the tools function. If you learn to use it correctly, you can turn out work as good as any. It just takes practice.

Good luck, Willie X
 

binman

Registered User
Nov 16, 2011
812
2
18
Chatham England
Country
Region
What Dew mentions is sometimes called 'nibbling'. That word aptly describes this action of the cutter. You push down and cut in little strokes, exactly in the areas where material needs to be removed. You can practice this on old discarded plates. If they have stamped oil sinks you can use this as a good guide for your 'nibbling'. In the absence of an oil sink, you can make a little marking scribe. This little tool will scribe a tiny circle to show you where the old center is before you start cutting.

It is very important to start off, like you are starting, with the purpose of maintaining the old center as your goal. Many folks falsely assume that the strength of the tool will force the tool to the correct place. Nothing could be further from the truth. The KWM tool has a little extra slop at the quick-change bit attachment knuckle. This is not a detriment to the tools function. If you learn to use it correctly, you can turn out work as good as any. It just takes practice.

Good luck, Willie X
Thank you both very much.Looking forward to using it, i have some old plates to practise on, then i have 4 clocks to do for a start.
 

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