• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Help KWM Bushing Size Question

Dietofnothing

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Nov 7, 2020
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Trying to figure this out & order some bushings. These bushings will be for American made mantle clocks (Ansonia, Gilbert, Sessions, & similar)... I’m getting some conflicting data? Maybe it varies on the clock, but for these clocks - is the bushing height (KWM American made) generally 1.4mm or 1.9mm? Or does it vary & you always have to measure the plates. I’m trying to see if it’s worth order an assortment, but if the height can vary - I’ll just wait & order exact sizes I suppose. I’m guessing if the bushing is too long, it’s better than too short - as you could just leave it long or file it?

thanks in advance all.
 

John P

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Timesavers assortment #11604 will cover most american clock movements.
 

kinsler33

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Press-in bushing height is mainly determined by convenience. If all you have are short bushings and a thick plate to bush, you can push in two bushings, one atop the other. If your bushings are too long, you can indeed file off the excess, but it's not particularly easy to do neatly. As for sizes, I keep a couple of one-week pill containers, but one will do at the start. Stock with 1.0mm to 1.9mm, which all use the # III reamer. Couple of other things: you can always broach out a bushing that's too small, and indeed you'll likely have to do this anyway if wheels don't spin freely in their new bushings. And, since outside diameters aren't as consistent as they ought to be, some press-in bushings will not seat firmly. But if your bushings stick out of the plate a bit you can rivet them over with a hammer on a flat anvil, and they'll stick tight pretty much forever. Generally a quick broaching of the bushing's ID is required afterwards.

I personally never had much luck with bushing assortments. I'll usually just purchase the Timesavers US-made bronze bushings (guessing at the heights I might need) in packs of 20 to keep my pill container filled up.

Mark Kinsler
 

shutterbug

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I use Bergeon and have the assortment that includes both long and short bushings. I probably use the long ones a couple of times a year. I buy replacements in packs of 100 and keep my inventory well stocked.
 

Dietofnothing

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Thanks all. I’ll go with Time Savers 11064 to start. Sounds like shorter bushings are more common - but isn’t critical & maybe they are interchangeable?
 

kinsler33

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Yup: short and long are interchangeable. The major difficulty with any press-in bushing seems to be the outside diameter. I don't truly trust any of them and haven't since KWM was introduced in the 1960's. (At that time there were no bushing machines: you'd just ream the hole by hand.)

M Kinsler
 

kinsler33

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I use Bergeon and have the assortment that includes both long and short bushings. I probably use the long ones a couple of times a year. I buy replacements in packs of 100 and keep my inventory well stocked.
Every so often I contemplate abandoning KWM for Bergeon, for I have some issues with KWM. Are there any good arguments for considering this further?

Mark Kinsler
 

kinsler33

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You don’t trust them because the size is inconsistent?
Yes. Some are difficult to insert and some can easily be pushed out when you're trying to get the pivot into them. The inside diameters can vary a bit as well, but that's not as critical. There's someone out there with a worn-out automatic screw machine.

Mark Kinsler
 

Dietofnothing

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Thanks. I ordered everything from Timesavers that was suggested here plus more. They seemed to be my best chance at a 1 stop shop.

One thing that isn’t clear is, if you need to file the old worn bushing hole equal and opposite to the worn part of the hole so the reamer will center, what file are you using?

I have an inexpensive set of “needle files” & ordered what appears to be the smallest files Timesavers has. They have a few shapes; but are listed as “2 mm”. Seems too big to shape the inside of an oblong hole that will ultimately be reamed to 2.7mm (KWM reamer size 3). Maybe you just use the tip of the file or these are the wrong files?
 

kinsler33

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Use these:


They last about forever (sometimes the tips will break off) and they will fit into any hole. They cut fast, and you can use them by themselves, in a pin vise, and I keep one chucked into my faithful $10 Harbor Freight bogus Dremel tool:


If you've just ordered from Timesavers you can often call them again and ask them to add things to your order if it hasn't gone out yet. They're on Mountain Standard time. Use the phone, not e-mail, for this. Otherwise you can likely find the reamers on eBay.

Mark Kinsler
 
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Dietofnothing

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Thanks Mark, actually I ordered those too. I read somewhere you shouldn’t use a broach to make the bushing hole bigger when you are trying to even out the worn out part prior to reaming - but using a file is better.

Maybe this is true in a perfect world - but I’ll use whatever fits. It looks like some people just skip this part and use a reamer from the start anyway - I guess it depends how worn the bushing is how much of a difference it could make.
 

kinsler33

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What you read is correct, but these little tools are closer to very thin diamond files (aka pivot files, only diamond) than hole-enlarging reamers. You insert them into the hole only to a depth that will permit the hole to be rendered symmetrical around the location of the original hole. That is, put the reamer partway into the hole, hold it against the _un_ worn side of the hole, and then scrape it back and forth three or four times. This should, with some luck, tend to center the reamer on the original hole. I generally use one of these chucked into the aforementioned rotary tool. There are also official pivot files, but I haven't used these.

Mark Kinsler
 

bikerclockguy

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Use these:


They last about forever (sometimes the tips will break off) and they will fit into any hole. They cut fast, and you can use them by themselves, in a pin vise, and I keep one chucked into my faithful $10 Harbor Freight bogus Dremel tool:


If you've just ordered from Timesavers you can often call them again and ask them to add things to your order if it hasn't gone out yet. They're on Mountain Standard time. Use the phone, not e-mail, for this. Otherwise you can likely find the reamers on eBay.

Mark Kinsler
I have a set of the diamond reamers, and they have served me well, although I find I use mine more for removing burrs from gun barrel breeches than for clock work.
 

kinsler33

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They work well for a surprising variety of jobs, but they can cut faster than you might imagine, so care is advised. They're exceedingly effective when just hand-held. In the bogus Dremel rotary tool thingy they work pretty well on plastic and wood. They quickly clog in soft materials, but still cut at a moderate rate, and then you can clean them without much trouble.

Mark Kinsler
 

shutterbug

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If you have an actual reamer and a way to lock the plate into position, you don't need to file the hole first. Use a center locator, clamp the plate and slowly "nibble" at the unworn side of the hole until the hole becomes round. Then you can add more pressure to finish it. The head stock and the plate must both be solidly in line with very little runout for this to work.
 

Dietofnothing

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Seems like there are a few people out there on You Tube just putting the KWM reamer in a drill press, eyeballing canter & dropping the drill press through the plate. I’m guessing this is not a good way to do things? It looks like an easy way to do things.

Also, when you pick your bushing, do you want the I.D. to be closest size bigger than the pivot or smaller (and then broach it out)?
 

MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

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When you use the drill press method, it is necessary to recenter the hole using a file. Once the hole is re-centered my belief is that the drilling will be on center. It actually is the easy way to do things.

For the smaller sized bushings, usually one can pick the size larger than the pivot because the bushing will compress and putting it into the hole. If you have a situation, where it is still too large you can always pop out the bushing and put in the one that is smaller.
 

kinsler33

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I use Mr Butterworth's method, but I've had better luck just chucking the reamer directly into the drill press. That adapter he uses--I used it too--occasionally lets the reamer drop out of sight amongst the layers of junk.

M Kinsler

I'll clean it all up someday.
 

shutterbug

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If you are not clamping the plates in place firmly, then yes - you have to file the hole in the equal and opposite direction from the wear. However, if the plate is clamped in place and you don't get too aggressive with the press pressure, you can nibble the hole without filing it first. Mark's method allows the reamer to find center from the filing without using clamps. Nibbling forces it to cut the unworn side of the hole first, then the worn side. The center position must be determined before clamping.
 

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