• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

KWM Bushing question

legosnell

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Nov 5, 2020
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If using the KWM #3 Reamer (2.7mm), should you use the KWM 2.7mm o.d. bushing or is that going to produce a loose fit since hole and bushing will be same size? Or is this considered the way to go, the perfect fit?

L-16 2.7mm O.D. x 1.4mm height x 1.2mm bore Bushing with #3 2.7mm KWM Reamer
 

bikerclockguy

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Yes, use the same size bushing and reamer. The reamer makes a more precise cut than a drill bit, and the fit will be tight. Its important to stop the reamer as soon as the widest part punches through the plate, though! Then just finger seat the bushing in the hole and snap it in with a pair of channel locks and you’re all set. When you get the bushing installed, install the wheel between the plates and spin it with your fingers. It should spin freely, with no binding or resistance. If it doesn’t, you will need to enlarge the hole slightly with your broaches, but normally, if you have selected the proper bushing size, they are a good fit right out of the gate.
 
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legosnell

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Yes, use the same size bushing and reamer. The reamer makes a more precise cut than a drill bit, and the fit will be tight. Its important to stop the reamer as soon as the widest part punches through the plate, though! Then just finger seat the bushing in the hole and snap it in with a pair of channel locks and you’re all set. When you get the bushing installed, install the wheel between the plates and spin it with your fingers. It should spin freely, with no binding or resistance. If it doesn’t, you will need to enlarge the hole slightly with your broaches, but normally, if you have selected the proper bushing size, they are a good fit right out of the gate.
Appreciate that, I thought so but wasn't sure. I have reamers 1-5. But only have L-16 bushings 2.7mm od 1.4mm height which I think are the most common used for Mantel Clocks. Probably need to have a good assortment on hand instead of just one size.
 

Elliott Wolin

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I purchased a very limited selection of KWM bushings sizes (one pivot hole size for each plate thickness/reamer size) with small pivot holes and just broach to fit. As an amateur I don't want to spend a lot on a bushing inventory, and efficiency is not important to me (as it is to someone making a living repairing clocks).
 
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legosnell

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I purchased KWM bushings with small pivot hole sizes and just broach to fit. As an amateur I don't want to spend a lot on a bushing inventory, and efficiency is not important to me (as it is to someone making a living repairing clocks).
Do you buy one set of bushings (20 each) for each of the reamers? say reamers 1-5. at the 1.4mm height? 100 bushings with the smallest bore for each?
 
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Elliott Wolin

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I bought bags of 50 each from Butterworth with no oil sinks (I cut my own with a chamfer cutter). I think he was clearing them out so they were pretty cheap. I think I purchased two or three bushing heights and the smallest pivot hole size for each height he had left (not always the smallest possible, but close). I recall I purchased five bags to cover all the plate/hole sizes I expected. I don't have the biggest reamer #5. I purchased a centering tool since I use my (very good) drill press if I have to do more than one or two bushings (find hole center with centering tool, clamp plate, create round hole with very rigid center drill, then ream at very low RPM).
 
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Cespain

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I hope you don't mind me asking a related bushing question! If you install a bushing of greater height than the plate, eg 1.4mm in a 1.2 plate, I presume it is best to level the bushing off and what is the best way of doing this?
 
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Kevin W.

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Cespain. You install the bushing from the inside of the clock plates. If its higher on the front of the plate. One way is to file it down. It depends what tools you have.
 

bikerclockguy

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I hope you don't mind me asking a related bushing question! If you install a bushing of greater height than the plate, eg 1.4mm in a 1.2 plate, I presume it is best to level the bushing off and what is the best way of doing this?
I grind mine down close with a Dremel, and then finish with a file. IMO, it’s no big deal if the bushing is not exactly flush. No one is going to see it unless they have the clock apart, and the chamfer on the bushing makes a good oil sink.
 

bikerclockguy

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Do you buy one set of bushings (20 each) for each of the reamers? say reamers 1-5. at the 1.4mm height? 100 bushings with the smallest bore for each?
For mantel clocks, I find the 1.3, 1.5 and 1.7 ID bushings cover 90% of my bushing needs, and of the 3, I find I use the 1.7 more than the others. I wouldn’t go overboard on quantity on any of them until you see what you use the most. Also, I haven’t needed anything other than the 2.7 OD bushings for American mantel and wall clocks. Seth Thomas has some smaller movements that may require a smaller OD bushing, such as the round movements in their City Series, and the chapel clock movements, and some of the French movements have tiny pivots as well, but for Ansonia, Sessions, Waterbury, Ingraham(and even the majority of Seth Thomas movements, for that matter)2.7 has got you covered.
 
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D.th.munroe

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I often use rose cutters and oil sink cutters. These are the small ones.
Probably something against using them, but works for me, do it right and makes bushings almost invisible in alot of clocks.
Dan

16097098183998253611644437196368.jpg
 
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D.th.munroe

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That looks like a nice set. Do you use them for other purposes as well since I'm sure trimming down bushes is not than common a requirement.
I think the types of rose cutters in this set are for cutting counter sinks for screws and jewels in watches, the 2 on the front left side are for rounding the ends of locating pins or taper pins.
The handle isn't original its from a mosley staking set and the loose ones are k&d.

An inexpensive solution is to get a split point drill,135 deg., and take the edge off to produce a zero degree rake. A few assorted ones will cover the gamut of sizes.
If you use a very fine stone on the cutting edge or polish it, it leaves a pretty decent clean looking oilsink as well.
 

shutterbug

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Just for info, reamers are usually sized about .002" smaller than the bushing. That way the bushing has a nice push fit that is tight.
 
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