Kundo Clock Help Needed

Wayne A

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Sep 24, 2019
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I have a similar clock and are you talking about the springs under the motion works? Theres a curved and a flat there. So when you pin the minute hand on there typically just a cupped washer in front of the minute hand and should only apply a small compression of the curved spring to provide enough friction to drive the motion works.

Could be a problem with the motion works too so check for burrs or any binding as you rotate the gears. But it gets down to overswing, if your not getting 25-30deg on each side you might have problems with a pin pallet. Pin pallets can be a little tougher to get going, just less efficient.

Wayne
 

kellycru5

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Aug 6, 2019
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Still running 2 hours later. Put second tension washer in, in this configuration. Hour hand,(, I, ), front of works case. The orientation of the washers are the parenthesis. ( =tension washer in this direction then, I is flat washer, then ) = tension washer in this direction.
 

kellycru5

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Wayne if you look back at #20 I have the washers aligned on the cannon pinion but have added a 3rd tension washer. It seems to be working!? I thought that without the second tension washer I could not get the minute hand tighter so that it did not slide for the 3 to the 6 by tapping on the base. I am not getting a lot of overswing, oiled the pin pallets very sparsely like I was told early. Just cleaned and sanded some burrs with 3000 grit. Will let you know manana if still going. Thanks guys
 

kellycru5

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Hello. Still running 26 hours later! These are the first 2 clocks I have ever worked on. I don't know how you guys do it. It must drive you crazy sometimes. Thanks for your help and I am sure something will go wrong sooner or later. It is fun though to check up on the forum
 

Wayne A

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Sounds good, so far! :)

400 days temperamental behavior is part of the attraction.
 

Phil G4SPZ

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400 days temperamental behavior is part of the attraction.
It’s worth remembering that the going barrel on a 400-day clock only rotates once approximately every two months, the first wheel goes round about once a week, and so on. Hence if you have any fault like a bent first arbor (quite common in my experience) or a bent tooth, it could be some considerable time before these align, causing power loss and stopping the clock.

For this reason, it is wise to extend the ‘click test’ to ensure the train runs totally freely throughout one complete revolution of the going barrel before fitting the anchor. It might take you an hour, but it could save you considerably more time in the future!

Phil
 
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Wayne A

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Sep 24, 2019
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It’s worth remembering that the going barrel on a 400-day clock only rotates once approximately every two months, the first wheel goes round about once a week, and so on. Hence if you have any fault like a bent first arbor (quite common in my experience) or a bent tooth, it could be some considerable time before these align, causing power loss and stopping the clock.

For this reason, it is wise to extend the ‘click test’ to ensure the train runs totally freely throughout one complete revolution of the going barrel before fitting the anchor. It might take you an hour, but it could save you considerably more time in the future!

Phil
I've mapped out the gear ratio's on a few 400 days and have seen from 69-109 days per rotation of the mainspring. Quite a range depending on design.

I always run the mainspring several rotations without the anchor using only couple of clicks at a time. Different loading than with the anchor in but its worth doing as well.

Wayne
 
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Ken M

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I'm facing this issue with the Hamilton. It runs fine, but then something hits the brakes. I've had it apart, cleaned and cleaned some more, inspected and re-inspected. and it will just stop. Last time that happened, this morning, the escape wheel wouldn't advance....guess that why it's stopped! Don't know where it's locking up, somewhere close to the escape wheel.
 

Phil G4SPZ

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Go back along the train, checking for torque. You should quickly find where the stiffness is occurring.
 

Phil G4SPZ

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I don't know how you guys do it. It must drive you crazy sometimes.
It seems like these clocks will drive you crazy when you first start out servicing them, but as time goes on and you discover more about how they work, you begin to realise that they are in fact completely logical. They’re just very clever, low-powered precision mechanisms, and everything has to be well-nigh perfect for them to run correctly. The awkward thing is that some of the adjustments are critical and difficult to do. If you have a clock that won’t run, you just haven’t found the fault yet. No magic involved, just good engineering. Persistence will usually be rewarded!

Phil
 
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Schatznut

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Sep 26, 2020
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There was a tension washer visible in post #20
That's because that's a photo I took of one of my clocks and posted to another thread last October in response to a tension washer question. The purpose of the photo was to show the orientation of the two washers. The flat one seats on the step on the minute arbor and the dished one goes between the flat one and the cannon.
 

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