Kundo Kundo C cell, rotating pendulum: advice needed

Aozora

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May 27, 2021
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First post, with thanks to everyone for their knowledge.

My wife found this clock recently and bought it because her late father brought one back from Germany when she was young. We don't know what happened to the original after his passing, so it was exciting to find what seems to be a match for sentimental reasons.

I don't know how to identify a model number. The face is marked Kundo and it is also marked as made in W. GERMANY.

The clock keeps time with the C battery inserted but the pendulum does not spin. The seller sent a video of it functioning as expected prior to shipment. I think something related to the torsion spring assembly broke in transit, but I don't know what part to order or how to install it.

Any help identifying the model, finding a manual, or guidance on what part to order would be greatly appreciated. Photos of the face, electronics and torsion assembly (not connected to the pendulum... that's my puzzle) below.

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whatgoesaround

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I collect mechanical 400 days, so I can't help you with the electronics or what strength of suspension spring to order, but the suspension spring looks like it is broken/unattached to the pendulum.
 

Aozora

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May 27, 2021
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Thank you for confirming that, we suspected as much but it helps to have expert input. There isn't enough length of the torsion spring to reach the pendulum. I have no idea how they are supposed to attach or if there is a missing part that is supposed to be molded to the bottom of the torsion spring and THEN connect to the pendulum.

The electronics are in great shape and it keeps time, but the pendulum components are mysterious to me.

I have been looking at the following site to see if I can guess the part, but I just don't know. That is why I am grateful the community exists. We are hopeful someone will have worked with this model before and be able to point us in the right direction.

Possible parts source?
 

roughbarked

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Aozora

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That makes perfect sense, looking at the unit.

Could anyone point me to the suspension unit appropriate for this unit and/or an appropriate manual? I don't know enough about Kondo clock varieties to even formulate a successful search query.
 

Aozora

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That other thread is getting closer. This unit runs on a C cell battery, not a AA, and I looked up the part number recommended in that thread. It doesn't appear to match.

Would any of these parts suppliers likely be able to identify the correct suspension unit if supplied photos? I'm still holding out hope someone in this community has run across this model before.
 

Aozora

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After deep diving into these forums, I am wondering if what we have is 64a:


If that's the case, the spring may simply have broken at the top of the black plastic cylinder (that connects to the pendulum?). The downside is I don't see this particular assembly available anywhere.

Any thoughts on if I have correctly identified the part very welcome. Links to suppliers that have it just as welcome.

My thanks to everyone for being so kind and patient with newcomers. My wife and I are very grateful
 

Aozora

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First, may many thanks to everyone for their help. I believe we have identified the part as a 64a. Before ordering, I attempted to repair the existing assembly with the tiniest amount of thermoplastic. I believe everything at the spring-to-pendulum attachment point is solid.

My next question is, how does this thing generate torsion on the spring? (See pics below) The spiked wheel rotates slightly with each tick of the clock, and has an internal spring allowing it to build tension if prrevented from rotating. The white arm appears as to have a peg that connects to the injection molded black plastic piece of the torsion spring assembly. There is a solid black peg between the white arm and the molded black piece preventing that. There is another black peg way at the top that looks like an over-travel stop, to prevent the white arm from swinging too far right. That case seems unlikely as the white arm also seems to have some spring tension causing it to tend in a clockwise direction.

With the battery in, the hands move, it chimes, and the white wheel turns. I believe the black piece injection molded on the torsion spring is supposed to have the white peg through it's hole and be sitting between the white arm and the fixed black peg. Yet, I don't see how this will cause any rotation of the spring.

Any thoughts or suggestions? I cannot seem to find photos of the internals of this model or any manual online, which is odd. Also, if I accidentally posted to the wrong subforum please let me know.

My apologies for the lack of proper nomenclature, I am new to these sorts of things. Thanks in advance!

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roughbarked

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Starting off these are all different and only a dim memory so try and make sense of my dead of night murmurings if you can.

What this does as you have surmised is give a kick to the rotation of the pendulum.
Everything has to be in place precisely and the suspension spring which you stuck back together needs to be very straight, no kinks. The weigght of the pendulum though slight should still suspend on a tight straingt spring. This is not about running the clock. This is about getting an impulse from the fourth wheel of the clock via the white wheel with the teeth which basically is an escape wheel but is sending an impulse rather than receiving one.
The coiled spring in the wheel gives it a backup to keep the action running but like an escape wheel there is a lock and drop that must be absolutely correct or the impulse which is very weak anyway, just cannot do the job.
You should be able to observe the inner spring functioning as the wheel turns.
It is probably forty years since I've had a go at repairing these so my memory is a lot faded and there was a different set up on each one I looked at during the time they were around.
So I don't recall about the white pin going through the black hole. However, if it lines up then this may be why the hole is there but I doubt that is important right now. The black piece is or should be called the impulse pin. On ones I do recall, they simply had a white impulse pin. The white lever is there to both assist in adding as much turn to and to prevent it slipping back and losing the gained torsion from the suspension spring which is where the torsion is once it has been wound up by the wheel.
The Impulse should continue pushing until the locking lever slips off and the torsion gained in the suspension should return to be wound up again.
None of this is important to the running of the clock but I have seen where if dysfunctional due to parts damaged or reinstalled wrongly, that it may stop the clock.

Welcome to the forum. You'll find people who know a lot more than I do here.
Yes You posted in the right forum area. Usually a moderator will move the post if you did not.
 

Aozora

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May 27, 2021
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Brilliant explanation! That was exactly what I needed to get all the parts interacting properly in my head.

Thanks to everyone on these forums, the clock is now working. I am only getting 180 degree rotation, but some of the elasticity of the torsion spring is likely lost due to the reinforcement of thermoplastic just above the pendulum component.

The big thing here is that it made my wife smile. Tomorrow is her birthday, so having this at least mostly working before then means a lot to us.

Our thanks to everyone in this community. This is our first Kundo but maybe for one of our future anniversaries I'll try to get her a mechanical version.

Also, for the curious, I found a video showing how these parts are meant to interact. This is a shorter model clock, and the electronics differ, but the physical mechanism kicking off the impulse is the same:

(Skip to 1:13 to see the similar model at work)

Once again, our gratitude to everyone. Thank you for being so kind and generous with your time!
 
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Schatznut

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Brilliant explanation! That was exactly what I needed to get all the parts interacting properly in my head.

Thanks to everyone on these forums, the clock is now working. I am only getting 180 degree rotation, but some of the elasticity of the torsion spring is likely lost due to the reinforcement of thermoplastic just above the pendulum component.

The big thing here is that it made my wife smile. Tomorrow is her birthday, so having this at least mostly working before then means a lot to us.

Our thanks to everyone in this community. This is our first Kundo but maybe for one of our future anniversaries I'll try to get her a mechanical version.

Also, for the curious, I found a video showing how these parts are meant to interact. This is a shorter model clock, and the electronics differ, but the physical mechanism kicking off the impulse is the same:

(Skip to 1:13 to see the similar model at work)

Once again, our gratitude to everyone. Thank you for being so kind and generous with your time!
And please tell you wife Happy Birthday from all of us on the forum!
 

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