Kundo bottom locking guard

Discussion in '400-Day & Atmos' started by Steve33, Nov 17, 2019.

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  1. Steve33

    Steve33 Registered User

    Nov 17, 2019
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    Hello. I'm a new member, and just acquired a Kundo 400 day clock, non-running, from a junk shop. I replaced the mangled suspension spring, set the beat, and it's running pretty well now. But I have a couple of questions. My clock movement is plate no. 1367 from the repair guide, and has a bottom locking guard that looks like the one shown in appendix 123 - Kundo standard 49. However, the bottom block of the suspension unit is a Unit 3A-Kundo standard 53. My first question is, what is the purpose of this bottom locking guard? I can lower it down over the bottom block so that it prevents rotation or swinging of the pendulum, but it provides no support. If I move the pendulum out of it's cup and out of the way, I can fully lower the locking guard, then with some difficulty and much trepidation, I can hang the pendulum by the bottom block resting in the lowered locking guard. But this puts a lot of slack in the suspension spring, and is accomplished with great risk of kinking the spring at the bottom guard. I realize part of the problem is that my 3A bottom block is probably not the intended block for this style locking guard, but I still don't understand the purpose of the thing. Instructions from the early 50s only mention it in reference to lifting it out of the way prior to hanging the pendulum onto the block.
    My second question concerns the click spring. My spring does not engage the click at all. I have to manually manipulate the click when winding. Can this spring be safely bent back into shape?
    Thanks!

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  2. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
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    Oct 25, 2010
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    Mascoutah, IL
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    Hi Steve,

    Welcome to the message board and the world of torsion clocks. The lock on your Kundo holds the bottom block and the suspension spring with the pendulum removed. The bend in the two fingers capture the pin while the block rests between.

    Bend the click spring to engage the click. You may need to remove it to do so. I've found Kundo click springs are really weak.

    Eric
     
  3. Steve33

    Steve33 Registered User

    Nov 17, 2019
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    Thank you for the helpful comments Eric. So that "locking guard" doesn't really lock anything, but rather just provides a place to park the suspension unit when the pendulum is removed. Seems to be of very limited utility. Thanks for your advice on the click spring, I removed it and found it to be extremely weak. I've got it working for now, but I doubt it will function for long. This clock is actually my second 400 day clock. My other one is a Kundo standard that I received new in the box as a gift on the occasion of my first wedding anniversary in 1974. It's still running fine, the only thing I've ever done to it is reset the beat after the suspension spring got twisted when the pendulum wasn't locked properly during a move. It's still got the original, twisted spring and keeps very accurate time if I wind it every 6 months. The marriage is still running fine as well, although I've had to reset the beat on that a few times.
     
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  4. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 25, 2010
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    Retired Avionics Technician
    Mascoutah, IL
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    The idea behind any of the guards or locks was to protect the suspension spring from damage. Holding the bottom block without the pendulum in place does the same as locking the pendulum. The lock just reduces the chance that the end user will break it while setting the clock up.
     

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