Korean Ansonia Clone?

MNSTREETGLIDE17

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Serviced this clock for my cousin. He purchased in south Korea in 1980 for his parents. Trying to find out more info about the maker and era it was produced. The plates are stamped steel and has a mix of brass and steel components. No makers mark anywhere. My Facebook group thought maybe Sam Heung but his movements were all brass. Appears to me to possibly be early to mid 1900's based on appearance and patina, thoughts anyone?

IMG_20220531_191849073.jpg IMG_20220524_193648429.jpg IMG_20220526_101411370.jpg IMG_20220524_192311115.jpg
 

Dick Feldman

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I believe you have made some wrong assumptions.
Please check the following link for a brief history.
Ansonia Clock Company - Wikipedia
The clock you have is, I believe, a product of Ansonia Clock Co., Inc., Lynwood Washington.
That company sold clocks with the same old, same old, low quality Korean Movements.
1980 would be near the time that clock was originally built and sold.
The clock you have only carries the Ansonia name.
That is what I think,
Dick
 

Uhralt

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To me, the movement looks like a Japanese movement made in the Ansonia style. The protective shields next to the mainsprings make me think this. I think the movement is older than 1980. My guess would be around the turn of the century.

Uhralt
 
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ChimeTime

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My guess would be around the turn of the century.
In cases like this where the movement can't clearly be identified or dated, it may be best to look at the rear of the clock. If the clock is truly 100 years old the wood will be oxidized and aged in a way that can't be duplicated or faked. If it's simply a Korean copy from the last quarter of the 20th century, then the rear will be some type of press board.
 

R. Croswell

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If purchased in 1980 it would likely have been made somewhat before that date. The steel plates and gears to me suggest “hard times”, or a period when brass was of limited availability, perhaps WW1 or WW2? To me, it looks a little like Japan, but just guessing. Hope someone comes along with the full story.

RC
 

new2clocks

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There appears to be a circular trademark on the plate. See the last picture for reference.

Can the OP provide a clear, close-up picture?

Regards.
 

wow

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There appears to be a circular trademark on the plate. See the last picture for reference.

Can the OP provide a clear, close-up picture?

Regards.
I saw that too, but I think it is the end of a post that is riveted on that end. The second photo shows the opposite end of the post. ( I think).
 
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JTD

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I saw that too, but I think it is the end of a post that is riveted on that end. The second photo shows the opposite end of the post. ( I think).
I saw it too, and came to the same conclusion.

JTD
 

wow

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Here’s one just like it from my bone pile. It’s old. I don’t know what clock it came from. The plates are definitely steel and the wheels are made of brass and aluminum (I think).

584A8EF5-F952-481F-9796-1B4831F3FFD2.jpeg 39AF2AF3-D88F-4251-A419-E2E04D317361.jpeg
 

MNSTREETGLIDE17

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In cases like this where the movement can't clearly be identified or dated, it may be best to look at the rear of the clock. If the clock is truly 100 years old the wood will be oxidized and aged in a way that can't be duplicated or faked. If it's simply a Korean copy from the last quarter of the 20th century, then the rear will be some type of press board.
Back of the clock is solid wood, not a pressed material.
 

MNSTREETGLIDE17

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I saw that too, but I think it is the end of a post that is riveted on that end. The second photo shows the opposite end of the post. ( I think).
Correct, that is the riveted end of a post, one nut goes on the back.
 

MNSTREETGLIDE17

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If purchased in 1980 it would likely have been made somewhat before that date. The steel plates and gears to me suggest “hard times”, or a period when brass was of limited availability, perhaps WW1 or WW2? To me, it looks a little like Japan, but just guessing. Hope someone comes along with the full story.

RC
That was my assumption also. Cousin told me he thought it was a Korean copy of a Japanese copy of an early American clock.
 

wow

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That was my assumption also. Cousin told me he thought it was a Korean copy of a Japanese copy of an early American clock.
I’m not thinking Korean. I’m thinking Japanese. I’ve worked on many c1900-1910 Japanese schoolhouse clocks with such movements. The case has me puzzled, though. It has a repro.-1980s look. Perhaps a later case with a 100 year old movement? Is there evidence in the back of the case that a movement change has taken place? Extra holes etc.?
 

MNSTREETGLIDE17

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I’m not thinking Korean. I’m thinking Japanese. I’ve worked on many c1900-1910 Japanese schoolhouse clocks with such movements. The case has me puzzled, though. It has a repro.-1980s look. Perhaps a later case with a 100 year old movement? Is there evidence in the back of the case that a movement change has taken place? Extra holes etc.?
You could be on to something. No extra mounting holes but It only had 3 screws holding the movement in. The 4th hole in the upper left corner was marked but never used as you could not get access to install a screw. The movement was mounted as high as possible but the pendulum would touch the bottom of the case. The suspension spring was pulled upward in the chops and tied off with string to allow the pendulum to swing but it always ran fast. I corrected this by routering out the material under the pendulum, now it swings and can be regulated with the nut. So far accurate within a minute in 7 days.
 

Swanicyouth

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This is so timely, because I saw a similar one in an antique store yesterday. It was a knock off of an Ansonia Parisian, which I recently acquired an original. Similar style as this, but was interesting seeing it once I could picture the original
 
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shutterbug

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I also think Japanese. The Korean copies were often 30 day types, poorly made and bad replica's. The Japanese were very good at copying the original movements. Also less likely to use the stolen copyright emblems.
 
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Uhralt

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I’m not thinking Korean. I’m thinking Japanese. I’ve worked on many c1900-1910 Japanese schoolhouse clocks with such movements. The case has me puzzled, though. It has a repro.-1980s look. Perhaps a later case with a 100 year old movement? Is there evidence in the back of the case that a movement change has taken place? Extra holes etc.?
I agree with this statement. I also have a clock with a nearly identical movement with steel plates, and wheels from brass and from aluminum. It is a school house clock form around 1910 and the movement is Japanese.

Uhralt
 
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R. Croswell

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I agree with this statement. I also have a clock with a nearly identical movement with steel plates, and wheels from brass and from aluminum. It is a school house clock form around 1910 and the movement is Japanese.

Uhralt
The nineteen teens would be WW1 period and would account for the use of steel in place of brass. As for having only 3 mounting holes, I have a real Ansonia black iron mantel clock with a brass movement that’s essentially the same in brass and there are 3 mounting lugs, and 3 screw posts cast into the iron case. That doesn’t mean anything in this case, but when a movement doesn’t fit the case, that a sure sign that it isn’t original

RC
 
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