$ Kienzle?

Salsagev

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67BCFE14-0C37-444C-8087-31620F653EC1.jpeg 641C6C5D-7A90-4C89-8922-87B607B24333.jpeg 871B10D8-C3D1-40E2-9C10-BAA5709B234F.jpeg 081F8625-4E9C-4661-AD78-9C8B308CA839.jpeg 79FC4C5F-DE22-412A-9771-4CB4BC62FAC4.jpeg I have acquired this German clock. It came stripped and all the pieces look present. The seller said it’s from 1968 from a wedding. There is a lot of writing on the glass which is supposed to be wedding stuff. The finial is intact and complete which I suppose is kind of rare? I looked on the back to find a symbol that looks like kienzle but not sure. The case was disassembled when I got it. Any background knowledge on this? What is the value? Thanks.
 

Isaac

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Looks like it's indeed a Kienzle product. Similar to the french square movements in design.

Not rare, really. But a nice clock.

In good working order I'd give $120-200 for it.
 

Salsagev

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I only got it for 30. Should I stain it since it was stripped? How old is it? Could you tell with the numbers?
No - not rare.
I always thought these finials are always lost, or removed.


Was there supposed to be anything attached to the strike activation lever? Like string?
 

Isaac

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I only got it for 30. Should I stain it since it was stripped? How old is it? Could you tell with the numbers?

I always thought these finials are always lost, or removed.


Was there supposed to be anything attached to the strike activation lever? Like string?
A good deal. Since it was stripped, I don't think you'd harm the value of the clock if you try to match the stain to the original. Perhaps around 1910-1920.

Yes, a string with a metal ring at the bottom is used to trip the strike train to resynch it (although you can just move the hour hand to the hour struck).
 

Isaac

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Thanks for the reply. Any idea what that fraction represents or that Roman numeral “II”?
The Roman numeral most likely represents quality (Ie. "First quality" or "Second quality") that the Germans liked to label on some of their clocks. The fraction is pendulum length if memory serves correctly.

Regards.
 

new2clocks

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How old is it? Could you tell with the numbers?
The trademark on your movement was registered in 1892, and was the first of the "Flügelrad" trademarks of Kienzle. I believe they had 4 total Flügelrad trademarks. The last of the Flügelrad trademarks was registered in 1923. I do not know if the various Kienzle trademarks overlapped, but if they did overlap, I assume it would not be for too many years.

Based on the trademark and the style of case, your clock was most likely made in the 1890s to circa 1910 or so.

Our European colleagues are working on a Kienzle serial number database, but I am not sure how far along they are in that endeavor.

Perhaps the writing on the glass can provide some clues as to the date, but our German speakers will need to opine on this.

I always thought these finials are always lost, or removed.
No, they were not always lost.

Regards.
 

new2clocks

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The Roman numeral most likely represents quality (Ie. "First quality" or "Second quality") that the Germans liked to label on some of their clocks.
I know Lenzkirch used this system and would not be surprised if Kienzle did also. Second quality in Lenzkirch jargon did not mean inferior quality, just that the pivots of the movements were not as polished as the first quality movements - things of this nature.

Regards.
 

Isaac

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I know Lenzkirch used this system and would not be surprised if Kienzle did also. Second quality in Lenzkirch jargon did not mean inferior quality, just that the pivots of the movements were not as polished as the first quality movements - things of this nature.

Regards.
Right. The "First" quality Kienzle clock movements I've seen have the word "Prima" instead of the roman numeral "I". As you mentioned, there are little differences between the two "grades" that don't refer to inferior/superior quality. The Prima/First grade clocks seemed to have better gong assemblies, with dual coils instead of a singular coil.

Regards
 

JTD

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There is a lot of writing on the glass which is supposed to be wedding stuff.
The 'wedding stuff' says:

In remembrance of your
Wedding Day
from your comrades

Then follows the names of nine people but, rather strangely, no date. Going by the names, I would suspect they were from the south of Germany, perhaps Bavaria, but I cannot prove that.

JTD
 

Salsagev

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Thanks for the quick clarification. Should I remove the writing or keep it for history? Speaking of quality, this must be better quality then that other kienzle I had?
 

Isaac

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Thanks for the quick clarification. Should I remove the writing or keep it for history? Speaking of quality, this must be better quality then that other kienzle I had?
They are about the same quality. Perhaps your clock movement in this thread has solid pinions throughout, which would be a bonus.

Servicing them properly will extend their lifetime and both movements should be dependable.
 

Isaac

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I just finished servicing that but it was the metal was very soft and bendy.

Is this the cut pinion?
Was it one of your wall chiming clocks?

Yes, it's the same as a cut pinion.
 

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