Kienzle Tall Clock - What do I have?

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by R. Croswell, Sep 28, 2013.

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  1. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
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    This tall clock followed me home from an estate auction last week but so far I have not been able to find anything on-line showing this exact model. There is no label on the case and no name that I can find on the dial. The movement has the Kienzle logo stamp and the serial number 97686 and another number 115. The pendulum is brass faced with what appears to be a steel back and is relatively light. The stick is wooden. On the back of the pendulum is the number 139364268 which is hand written. The case appears to be oak and the door has three bevel glass panels. It is a “Bim-Bam” strike on 5 tone rods with two rods being struck together followed by the other three being struck together. The movement is very robust and well made and has very little wear. The hammers have a well-made worm gear adjuster. The strike fan has a strange design that I assume is some type of governor but I have not figured how it works. The pendulum hanger has a convenient lever for shifting the crutch to place the clock in beat. The brass shell weights are about 8.5 and 5.5 pounds. I put the heavy one on the strike side. The clock is a strong runner and only needed a little cleaning.

    A search of older posts seems to indicate that this clock has the Brandongong that was apparently introduced in 1912. I also found the following statement: “These so-called ‘round-head’ (Rundkopf) style cases were popular in Germany from the 1920s into the 1930s”.

    I am hoping that someone may be able to be more specific about what model this is and when it may have been made based of the various details and images of the movement. Is the 115 the model number of the movement or something else? Any comments and information appreciated.

    RC


    RC
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  2. chimeclockfan

    chimeclockfan Registered User
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    Dec 21, 2006
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    Chime clock & gong studies.
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    The Kienzle 5 rod bim-bam strike used on floor clocks was initially known as the "Barden Gong". Later models like your's omitted the name.
    The wall and mantel clock version used 3 rods and was known as the "Glocken Gelaute".

    The logo design would suggest this is a 1920s product. Careful inspection reveals this one was double stamped, the first stamp not going through the plates - unusual but not unheard of.
     
  3. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
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    Yes, Barden-Gong. I had that but typed it wrong! I noticed the double strike on the logo and wondered about it but assumed it was just restruck because the first impression was incomplete. I wonder if that affects the price of eggs or if it is just a curiosity?

    RC
     

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