Kienzle day-400 year???

Discussion in '400-Day & Atmos' started by Sanpellegrinz, Oct 23, 2019.

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  1. Sanpellegrinz

    Sanpellegrinz New Member

    Oct 23, 2019
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    Hello everyone, just picked up a 400-day clock and was wondering if anyone had any idea what year it is.. All I know is it's a kienzle.

    Thanks!

    20191023_212700.jpg
     
  2. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
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    Oct 25, 2010
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    #2 etmb61, Oct 23, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019
    The only way for us to give you any meaningful information is to see the back. Aside from that it sure looks like a Kienzle.

    It has a pin holding the hands so I would guess a solid pinion movement with a dead beat escapement. It also has a smooth bezel with a celluloid dial and thinner finials so I would guess a higher serial number.

    Eric
     
  3. Sanpellegrinz

    Sanpellegrinz New Member

    Oct 23, 2019
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    20191023_215513.jpg 20191023_215504.jpg
     
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  4. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
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    #4 etmb61, Oct 23, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019
    Well I don't have enough information on Kienzle to date your clock. What I can say is the suspension spring guard was designed to hold the adjustable bottom block that was used with Kiensle's first ball pendulum which was itself non-adjustable. I think that would have been about 1916?

    P1010051.jpg IMG_20141226_140616.jpg

    The pendulum you have is a Kern part made from leftover parts they acquired after they took over Schlenker and Posner around 1939.

    The number on your clock is one of those out of sequence with their normal production.

    Eric
     

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