Kienzle Age and Specs.

Discussion in '400-Day & Atmos' started by Keith Conklin, Jul 29, 2019.

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  1. Keith Conklin

    Keith Conklin Registered User
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    Aug 22, 2018
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    Hi All,
    I picked this clock up at the national last month. I am pretty sure I have a Kienzle, but I am not certain of age. Also, is the silver dial typical?
    Lastly, any help with main and suspension spring specifications would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks

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  2. KurtinSA

    KurtinSA Registered User
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    Nov 24, 2014
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    Definitely a Kienzle. Based on the serial number, I'd estimate the age about 1908/1909. Kienzle made 400 day clocks from 1907 to 1929. Early on they had close association with Würth. The upper suspension bracket is #14 by Würth. The gallery on your pendulum looks shorter than those on my Kienzle clocks which were after 1910. I suspect that the pendulum is also of Würth design. As for the dial, I also believe that to be supplied by Würth.

    I think the back plate is similar to 1163 in the repair guide. The guide says the suspension spring is 0.0035" and the main spring is 18x38. Is the suspension spring damaged in some way? From the pictures it looks OK.

    Kurt
     
  3. Keith Conklin

    Keith Conklin Registered User
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    Aug 22, 2018
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    Thanks Kurt,
    I asked the spring question because I am not as familiar with the Repair Guide as I would like to be. I found pate 1423 and not being aware that Kienzle clocks are represented in two locations, would have erroneously settled on this. Thanks for your knowledge. In answer to your question, the suspension spring seems fine. I had briefly leveled up the clock wound it a bit and hung the pendulum. She ran for a few minutes and stopped, the clock went up on the shelf and that's as far as I have gotten as I have other projects on the bench. With a clock of this age and type is the general wisdom to replace the mainspring when the clock is disassembled.?
     
  4. KurtinSA

    KurtinSA Registered User
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    Nov 24, 2014
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    Plate 1423 is actually a clock made by Würth despite what the guide says. I think 1163 is closer, but could be wrong. The style of the word "Germany" matches better.

    Sounds like the clock might be out of beat...or it could be dirty enough that it needs cleaning. If you're a repair person running a shop, you probably would replace all springs with each service. But that's the last thing that I consider until I find out the clock won't run no matter what I do or if I see something bad about the mainspring when I remove it for service.

    Kurt
     
  5. Keith Conklin

    Keith Conklin Registered User
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    Aug 22, 2018
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  6. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

    Jun 24, 2011
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    Automatically replacing the mainspring can cause more problems than it solves, depending on where you get your springs.The tempering on a lot of the more recently produced springs leaves a lot to be desired and it seems to have become a lost art. They are either too soft and set easily or are too brittle and break easily.
     
    Keith Conklin likes this.

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