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Kerosene

Salsagev

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It’s the microscopic pieces that come out the best. I tried the rotating parts and they did not stall or grind. I didn’t do a severe scrub down so I don’t think the grit embedded as much. I did do a Rodico touch up just to be sure.
 

bruce linde

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i use super clean to do an initial cleaning before putting parts in the ultrasonic.... just make sure you don't breathe it, as it's pretty gnarly stuff. i have spray bottles, RC uses the liquid and dips his parts. i can't see pumice being a good idea, as you don't want to scratch anything. and, as mentioned, lacquered pieces required extra care and handling....
 

R. Croswell

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Would anybody mind trying pumice cleaner on a cheaper trundle clock? Would really be interested on someone else’s take on it. That stuff cleaned my hands when cleaning the stuff. Cleaning my parts (excluding mainspring which was cleaned separately) took no more than 15 mins.
GoJo pumice is great, I use it all the time......... to clean my hands but I don't want it near any clock movement for the reasons stated by others. Cleaning the clock movement is the most important operation in clock repair. Clock people have been looking for that magic bullet single step cleaning method for years and will keep looking forever because it does not exist. The first step is to disassemble the movement. You simply can't properly clean your body with your cloths on and you can't properly clean a clock while it is assembled - period.

With a really dirty clock you will almost always need to use some physical means to brush, dig or scrape away the really tight stuck on crud. Then aggressive precleaning solution - one of the purple degreasers, Zep, kerosene, Dawn dish detergent, etc. can be effective first step. These are relatively inexpensive because you don't need to change them for each clock. Doing a proper preclean will prolong the life of your more expensive final cleaning solution such as Deox-007.

If you use an ultrasonic cleaner then you will have less manual work getting the the hard to reach places clean.

Finally a through rinse with something that is compatible with your final cleaning solution and drying.

No one seems to mention LA's Totally Awesome Cleaner from Dollar Tree, Family Dollar etc. for about a buck for a small bottle. Unlike Deox-007 and the ammoniated cleaners it will not brighten the brass plates, but if you are looking for a one-shot cleaner this is one to look at. It is really cheap, cuts old grease grime well, and rinses away with water and is nonflammable. It is not the magic bullet you seek, and like all the others you will need to do some manual labor to get rarely clean clock but for a buck you you probably can't fine anything more cost effective.

RC
 
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Salsagev

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How much importance is it for brass to be brightened? Also fingerprints 50 yrs later kinda scare and gross me out:O:.

I do like LA's Totally Awesome but it's just not powerful enough for the dirt and grease. I use that more for cases and cleaning soil.

As for Ultrasonic cleaning, I don't like digging around for smaller parts that may have dropped through the grate.

I've personally associated different cleaning methods with different clock types. Lacquered chime clocks - ultrasonic clean parts in hot ultrasonic solution (with pre-clean). French unlacquered round movements - Steel wool and one type of chemical. Super dirty American movements in Kerosene and springs in Kerosene.
 

steamer471

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I use stainless tea ball strainers for small parts in the ultrasonic. Pumice in Goop is merely abrasive particles suspended in a solution. If it's polishing your going after fine steel wool is better and easier to keep out of pivot holes and pinions.
 

R. Croswell

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How much importance is it for brass to be brightened?
The clock does not know whether the plates are brightened or not. The issue is whether you (or the clock's owner if not you) prefers to look at a bright shinny movement or a dull oxidized one. If you start to repair clocks for other people, especially clocks where the movement is visible, when the clock comes in dull and oxidized and goes out bright and shinny it looks like you have done a good job. Of course we know that it can look clean and still not be clean in unimportant places. Save the goop pumice for cleaning your hands and perhaps polishing brass candle sticks and door knobs.

RC
 
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Schatznut

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Another theological debate. The heretic in me says Citronox.
 

Schatznut

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Dude, that’s 75 bucks a gallon…

Purple Power is the way to go.
It's concentrated and you dilute it two ounces to a gallon so you get 64 gallons of solution for your $75. Purple Power is what, about $5 a gallon? How much do you dilute it?
 

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