Just got my first 'Grandfather' clock c1730

SAR

Registered User
Mar 8, 2021
37
2
8
65
Country
Excuse me for jumping in at this late stage, but I have been reading a new book Gothic Clocks to Lantern Clocks..Short-Duration Clocks & Rural Clocks 1480-1800 by John Robey. Chapter 5 covers English Lantern Clocks & Thirty Hour Clocks and describes in some detail a tall and slim rustic 'coffin' longcase clock with a movement converted from a Lantern Clock in Somerset c1680/1710. The case and converted movement look very similar to the one you are talking about here.

Richard
Hi Richard,

I appreciate your research, and would love to see that article. There are so many books to read, and some are very expensive, so I really appreciate it when people take time to look in their books to help me out.

I am sure there are a few converted lantern clock movements out there in longcase clocks, and usually you see the squares at the tops of the columns typical of lantern clocks, without which the spacing between the plates would be wrong. However the turned column birdcage movements I have found so far are regionally localised and cover quite a long period of time, and don't have the squares. I think the chances that most of these are lantern clock movements adapted into longcase clocks is exceedingly unlikely. However there are one or two that could fall into this category, and here is a link to an example described by Brian Loomes - but I think these are the exception.

Collecting Antique Clocks: A Sleeper Awakened, by Brian Loomes, writer and dealer

Maybe they felt they were perpetuating the lantern clock style by using turned columns - though given in the longcase the columns are hidden in most or maybe all of the early clocks, then the clock owner would hardly appreciate it.

Steve
 

rgmt79

NAWCC Member
Jul 23, 2016
341
22
18
Brno, Czech Republic. London, UK
Country
Region
Hi Steve,

The only reason why I thought it could be a converted lantern movement, is because of the decoratively turned pillars. I take your point about
the squares at the tops of the columns typical of lantern clocks
and it's difficult to imagine how the feet and finials would have been attached if your movement had been converted from a lantern clock. It would appear that the pillars on your movement are riveted to the top and bottom plates.

Another clue is the way the movement is mounted. In the book I referred to shows the original lantern movement hanging loop and spikes retained so that the movement would hang on a hook on the backboard and the spikes would fit into holes in the backboard. How is you movement mounted?

Richard
 

novicetimekeeper

Registered User
Jul 26, 2015
11,095
904
113
Dorset
Country
Region
There is no sign this movement ever had a hoop, nor any sign of a backplate or side doors. Posted frame longcase with round pillars tend to have much slimmer pillars than lantern clocks, certainly earlier lantern clocks.
 

SAR

Registered User
Mar 8, 2021
37
2
8
65
Country
Another clue is the way the movement is mounted. In the book I referred to shows the original lantern movement hanging loop and spikes retained so that the movement would hang on a hook on the backboard and the spikes would fit into holes in the backboard. How is you movement mounted?
The movement on my clock sits on the seatboard, and is secured by clips at the edge of the bottom plate. I have seen pictures of others secured in the same way, or by screws through the bottom plate and seatboard. On my one the seatboard had been replaced at some time, probably due to worm (plenty of wormholes in the backboard), but all the signs are that the new board is the same size as the original, though the clips look like replacements.

This is clearly a style of longcase clock movement favoured in the 'west country', in particular Wiltshire, Somerset and Devon, and seems to cover a fair part of the 1700-1750 period. I will have to get organised and try to properly catalogue the examples I have found so far as regards the exact shape of the columns, together with maker and dates. There are examples with and without the 'fins' on the columns.

Steve
 

Forum statistics

Threads
166,146
Messages
1,447,402
Members
86,689
Latest member
Bill Adams
Encyclopedia Pages
1,101
Total wiki contributions
2,883
Last edit
E. Howard & Co. by Clint Geller