JULES HUGUENIN pocket watch connundrum

Joseph Wragg

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Mar 11, 2010
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I am looking into purchasing huguenin pocket watch. There is little info on the watch and i am having difficulty finding anything about this watchmaker online. All i am sure about is that it is key wound "jeweled" and warrented fine silver. Are huguenin good watches? Any info about huguenin pocket watches would be much appreciated. Thank you for your consideration.
 

doug sinclair

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There were many Huguenins in the watchmaking business. The NAWCC BULLETIN index lists many of them. It lists one J Huguenin and one Jean Paul Huguenin. The J Huguenin might be Jules Huguenin. The index lists the volume, issue, and page number for the article on J Huguenin (who might be your guy), but there is no information in the issue that supposedly contains the information. One thing I have discerned about watches with the Huguenin name from reading past threads about the Huguenin name is that there were far more watches which were engraved Huguenin, than there were watches actually PRODUCED by a Huguenin. Seems it was "borrowed" rather a lot. Can you provide a picture?
 

Joseph Wragg

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Here are the pics, I am planning to use it as an everyday watch, so I didnt want to buy the nicest watch I can afford than scrape it all up or dent it. I thought this may be a decent option that is pretty cheap. Thanks for your consideration.
 

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kurtnz

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Pritchard lists Huguenin, Jules, Le Locle
Other company names: Jules Huguenin - Droz

History: Bourdin (Les Fabricants d’Horlogerie Loclois) by J P Bourdin Chateau des Monts, Le Locle 1986, listed three Jules Huguenin in Le Locle in the 19th century
 

Joseph Wragg

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sorry about the large font size. So there were 3 Jules Huguenin companies? And even more other Huguenin companies? Wow. This watch is turning into a little mystery. Can any of you speak to the quality of these oddballs. The mechanism certainly does not look as ornate as my elgin but, I am completly uninformed about european watches.
 

RON in PA

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Your watch appears to have a generic Swiss bar movement with a Swiss side lever escapement from the mid-19th century. If the parts are in good shape and the watch is properly cleaned and lubricated it should provide reasonable timekeeping. Compared to damaskassed American movements of the late 19th and early 20th centuries these watches are rather plain as you have commented in your reference to your Elgin.
 

jfl

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I have a watch similar to this one in 18k. A watch this old makes for a short lived everyday carry watch. Improvements like safety pinions and incablocs were developed to make watches more robust. If you are gentle it may be okay for occasional carry. My Jules Hugenin associated with my watch was a sales rep for an actual manufacturer most like the large pump or equipment industry today for water treatment appurtenances. I have never identified the actual maker of this watch, but I suspect it was a local firm. JFL
 

Joseph Wragg

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I did not realize that the watch was most likely mid 19th century. I will probably not carry it everyday, if it risks breaking something so old that still runs. I kind of like the mystery of not knowing its exact origin. How many jewels might be in it? I figured 7 (but I could be wrong). That means I still gotta hunt down an everyday carry watch but, thats ok, its a good excuse to get another watch. I will have it serviced shortly, something that old that still runs deserves it. What would you guys say is a good every day carry watch? I have an elgin 1910 381grade, but i dont want to loose anymore of the gold fill on it. I realize that fear of breaking will always exist. but maybe there are ones that make more sense (due to hardiness, or cost etc.) to carry around. Any thoughts? Or is that a silly question?
 
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th90a9

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What you have there is a 15 jewel swiss watch. I would definately get a different one to carry everyday. Nice watch to pass down or keep as your treasure.
 

jfl

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I would choose a nickel cased watch as an everyday carry watch, moreover with a screwdown coverin 18s if you can stand the weight. That said a 17j watch or better can always be repaired. PS or LS is your preference as both Elgin and Waltham produced these and they are easily obtainable. If weight is a concern choose a 16 or 12 size with a gold filled case (>/=25 years or silver if you prefer). Remember that the newer the watch the more enhancements it generally has incorporated into its design. JFL
 

Joseph Wragg

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I would definatly try to go for an 18s, weight is no concern for me. I like nickel and would not be opposed to getting one. So you might reccomend a 20th century waltham or elgin? What is PS or LS? As a newb, I am not familiar with that term.
Thanks for everyones comments and suggestions, It is very usefull for a new guy like me to be able to ask questions which may be very amatuerish, and get excellent info from a community who know alot.
 

th90a9

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PS stands for pin set and LS stands for lever set. The setting of the hands. If it has a pin next to the crown then it's a pin set. If you have to open the front cover and there is a lever(steel sticking out from the dial ussually on the right side of watch around the 1:00 position) the you have a lever set. If there is neither then you have a stem set by pulling up the stem. Congratulations, this is how we all learned...by asking.
 

Joseph Wragg

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Thanks! I have seen the little lever sticking out of some waltham pics, but I didnt know what they were until now. Is one type a better design than the others?
 

th90a9

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I prefer either the lever set or the stem set. The one big advantage of the lever set is you can't accidentilly set the watch and cause it to have the wrong time. The pin set, to me, is annoying because it will sometimes get stuck in the set position, especially if it gets corroded or dirty.
 

jfl

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I saw on an auction site a watch with a serial number of 41,708 with an 1876 inscription. Which means it is at least that old if not older. I thought that you might want to compare it to yours. JFL
 

Larry Treiman

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PS stands for pin set and LS stands for lever set. The setting of the hands. If it has a pin next to the crown then it's a pin set. If you have to open the front cover and there is a lever(steel sticking out from the dial ussually on the right side of watch around the 1:00 position) the you have a lever set. If there is neither then you have a stem set by pulling up the stem. Congratulations, this is how we all learned...by asking.

Hi th90a9,

Well, actually, in American usage, particularly regarding American watches, "PS" means "Pendant-Set" (the same as "stem-set"), where the watch is set by pulling out the winding crown into setting position and turning it.

Lever-set ("LS") watches were preferred for railroad watches (and later required) because they prevented the time from accidentally being changed by inadvertently pulling out the crown into setting position. Some manufacturers used lever-setting as an alternative to perhaps having to pay patent royalties if they did not have their own design for a pendant/stem setting mechanism. Some makers also preferred lever-setting for hunting-case watches, where it was simpler than designing a case pendant where the crown could both be depressed to open the case AND pulled out to set the watch.

"Pin-set" (sometimes called "nail-set, a reference to the thumbnail used to depress the pin) watches were not common for the American market, and were not compatible with standard American cases.

Larry Treiman
 
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