JUF Crystal Regulator

macaw

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P1010069.JPG P1010071.JPG I saw it on Ebay while searching for crystal regulators and had to have it. 3 hours to ultrasonic, clean and lube the spring, back together with a new suspension spring, and didn't need to set the beat (a first for me)
 
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KurtinSA

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Nice! I like the treatment on the dial. If I'm not mistaken, this was made by Andreas Huber, not JUF. If the three holes that secure the click bridge, click spring, and the click are in a dogleg pattern, it's a Huber. If the three holes are nearly a straight line, it's a JUF.

Kurt
 

Kevin W.

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Very nice clock, well done.
 

macaw

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P1020078.JPG P1020080.JPG P1020082.JPG P1020081.JPG Both of these are JUF and have the same back plates as the crystal regulator. These are the same models. I wanted one of each as they came with both the 4-ball and the disc pendulums at the time.
 

etmb61

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I never noticed the inscription! Thanks!
Nice find. I couldn't tell there was an inscription in the auction pictures either. Could you post a clear picture of it?

Thanks,
Eric
 

KurtinSA

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Both of these are JUF and have the same back plates as the crystal regulator.
Yes, both of these are JUFs and can clearly be seen by the logo at the bottom of the plate. Compare the three screws on the two JUFs with the crystal regulator...you should be able to see in the dogleg in the pattern on the crystal regulator. That's what distinguishes the three clocks.

Kurt
 
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macaw

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P1030091.JPG Eric, here's a closeup. Simichrome is my friend!
Kurt, I'm not sure I see what you see so I'll go with plate# 1471 dated 1902, same as the inscription.
 

KurtinSA

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I borrowed John's pictures from this post:

Help Identifying an inherited Clock

and added some lines to show the dogleg on the Huber clocks versus JUF. Hopefully that will help visualize the differences.

It's very special to have an inscription which significantly helps to date such an old clock. Very nice!

Kurt

Huber-JUF Dogleg.jpg
 

MartinM

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...It's very special to have an inscription which significantly helps to date such an old clock. Very nice!

Kurt
If it's truly a family heirloom or commemorating something like the first annual Rose Bowl game, I can live with an inscription.
Otherwise, I generally pass on those.
 

Burkhard Rasch

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I read "Prosis" which -in Latin- can have several meanings, the most probable comming from prodesse,a latin verb, 2nd. pers sing. ind. present active, could be translated as "You´re helpfull or usefull" or the like.HTH
Burkhard
 

MartinM

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While the English "Beneficial" or "for service" would be likely Latin translations, I can't help but wonder if there isn't a Low German dialect where "prosis" is a form of, "prost!" or "Cheers!"

Any chance the clock came out of Worcester county Massachusetts? There was a Catholic clergyman with that name operating in that area (Petersham, Athol, North Dana and Otter River) at the time.
 
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etmb61

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The last seller's location shown on ebay was Barre, Mass, 4 miles SE of Petersham.
 

Burkhard Rasch

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The german "Prost" (equivalent to "cheers" when lifting the glass) is an abreviation of the latin "prosit" which is 3rd pers sing. conjunctive present active and could be translated as "it should help,it should be good for something..."Although I live in a region where lower german dialects are frequently spoken I´ve never heard of "Prosis" as on the clock , it still makes no sense to me.
Best regards
Burkhard
 

MartinM

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The german "Prost" (equivalent to "cheers" when lifting the glass) is an abreviation of the latin "prosit" which is 3rd pers sing. conjunctive present active and could be translated as "it should help,it should be good for something..."Although I live in a region where lower german dialects are frequently spoken I´ve never heard of "Prosis" as on the clock , it still makes no sense to me.
Best regards
Burkhard
Given the Catholic connection, "Prosis" from Latin seems most appropriate and a loose translation of "For Service".
 

etmb61

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Words are such fun sometimes. I don't know much about Latin, but I found a reference on Wordsense.eu

<a href="prosis - WordSense.eu" target="_blank">"prosis" in WordSense.eu Online Dictionary</a>

that says: "Verb prōsīs
  1. Conjugation of prōsum (second-person singular present active subjunctive)"
"I am useful or of use, do good, help, benefit, serve, profit."

I guess that would make it something like: "In my opinion you are useful." An appropriate sentiment for a service gift I'd say. They must of had a small budget for letters.

Eric
 

John Hubby

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View attachment 510087 View attachment 510088 I saw it on Ebay while searching for crystal regulators and had to have it. 3 hours to ultrasonic, clean and lube the spring, back together with a new suspension spring, and didn't need to set the beat (a first for me)
Macaw, this is a particularly interesting clock being it is (a) made by Andreas Huber as Kurt has mentioned, and (b) that it can be accurately dated by reason of the inscription. My estimate is that it was made no earlier than late 1901 and most likely in first or second quarter 1902, thus confirming the date inscription. It does have Plate 1471, which I refer to as Plate 1471H being made by Huber (as seen in the photo posted by Kurt). The otherwise identical plate made by JUF has the click layout in the exact same pattern as the two later clocks you have posted, which I refer to as Plate 1471J. The Huber version was first made in early 1900 snd used until about February 1904 when Patent 144688 was granted to Huber for their twin-loop temperature compensating disc pendulum.

The JUF version was first made in early 1901 and used up to the same time in 1904 as the Huber version, after which the stamping became "DRP 144688 USP 751686". Huber never made any clocks with this stamping, by the time the patent was issued it is evident they had decided to close their 400-Day manufacturing and focus on licensing the considerable technology they developed for these clocks. They did continue to sell clocks under their "Urania" trademark by purchasing movements and complete clocks first from Ph. Hauck (1903-1906), JUF (1905-1908), and Kienzle (1908-1928). Huber resumed production and sale of their own 400-Day clocks using their patented lantern pinion-pin pallet design movements from 1912 to 1928 when they stopped all 400-Day clock business, however their solid pinion movements were all made by Kienzle.

With regard to your two JUF clocks, both were made in the period late 1923 to early 1927, when the logo on both clocks was used by JUF starting shortly after their reorganization in 1923 that brought Aug. Schatz' sons into the business. At that time the company name became "Jahresuhren-Fabrik G.m.b.H Aug. Schatz & Söhne" which was the last name used by the company up to their closure in 1986. In March 1927 the circular name logo was dropped leaving only the "double elephant" logo, immediately after August Schatz' death in February. That logo was used until 1931 after which JUF clocks had no logos until after WWII.
 
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