Help American PW Jewel repair Jewel Swap?

Watching the Wheels

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Jan 21, 2022
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Hi Watch Friends,
I'm a beginner hobby watchmaker. I have been restoring and servicing Antique pocket watches. I have had some success with a seven jewel Waltham Pocket Watch: Serial Number 15261248 (Grade No. 610) watch, so I had a little confidence trying a seventeen jewel movement. I have been to a couple NAWCC meeting/marts and have a nice little collection of mostly cheap poor running or non-running watches and a few nicer running watches as well.
I have several antique Waltham 625 movements. But there are some cracked jewels as well. I accidentally cracked the escape wheel jewel on the main plate of the watch I am servicing. This watch is a 1915(est.) Waltham Grade 625, Model 1908, 16s, 17j.
Screen Shot 2022-04-12 at 8.50.55 PM.png
Two Questions:
1. Is it possible to swap out this jewel with another?
2. What is the best tool(s) to do the job?
As always, thanks for tips and advice,
- John Screen Shot 2022-04-12 at 8.50.55 PM.png
 

svenedin

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I wonder whether that cracked jewel has already been replaced at some point. It looks different to the others. I know nothing about American watches but others will be able to answer your questions. Can I see the other side of the plate where the broken jewel is please?
 
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gmorse

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Hi John,

Apart from the obvious question of how this can be replaced, which I'll leave others more knowledgeable about Waltham 1908s to answer, (they look like jewels rubbed into brass settings to me), my specific query is, do you fully understand how you came to crack this jewel, because without that insight, it could well happen again!

Regards,

Graham
 
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Watching the Wheels

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Jan 21, 2022
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Hi John,

Apart from the obvious question of how this can be replaced, which I'll leave others more knowledgeable about Waltham 1908s to answer, (they look like jewels rubbed into brass settings to me), my specific query is, do you fully understand how you came to crack this jewel, because without that insight, it could well happen again!

Regards,

Graham
Hi Graham. I had successfully re-assembled the train of wheels a couple of times prior, and I may have been overconfident. The train wheel plate slipped out of my tweezers whilst hovering above the movement trying to line up all the pivots and screw holes. I think that was the moment the jewel cracked.
Thanks,
- John
 

Watching the Wheels

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Jan 21, 2022
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I wonder whether that cracked jewel has already been replaced at some point. It looks different to the others. I know nothing about American watches but others will be able to answer your questions. Can I see the other side of the plate where the broken jewel is please?
I will upload a picture from the other side later this evening.
 

gmorse

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Hi John,

Just a thought, but you may find it more comfortable to handle plates with finger cots rather than holding them in tweezers. The finer tweezers are good for handling the train wheels and other small parts, but the same tweezers don't provide such a secure grip on larger, heavier items like plates, which have a tendency to swivel out of your grip. Tweezers should certainly be an extension of your fingers, but sometimes only the real thing will do.

An alternative is to acquire some heavier brass tweezers, such as AA size, which have the added benefits of not marking the plates and being softer, give a more secure hold.

Regards,

Graham
 
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Watching the Wheels

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Jan 21, 2022
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I wonder whether that cracked jewel has already been replaced at some point. It looks different to the others. I know nothing about American watches but others will be able to answer your questions. Can I see the other side of the plate where the broken jewel is please?
Here is the dial side view of the jewel. It's the one in the middle. Screen Shot 2022-04-15 at 7.28.45 PM.png
 

Dave Coatsworth

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These jewels on the model '08 are in brass bezels which are friction fit into the plate. You can tap them out (gently!) in a staking set. Use a flat face hollow punch that will just fit into the hole in the plate. Basically, you want the stake to contact the bezel and not the jewel. Place the 'punchbowl' shaped stump underneath to catch the jewel. Then gently tap.
 

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