Jerry Kieffer wheel cutter method?

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Ken L., Feb 14, 2018 at 1:39 PM.

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  1. Ken L.

    Ken L. Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 25, 2015
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    Steam locomotive engineer at Washington Park and Z
    Milwaukie, Oregon
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    I am wanting to learn the correct way to make single point cutters for making clock wheels. I keep seeing the name "Jerry Kieffer" pop up on the internet, but haven't found any printed info on his methods. Is there such a thing available? Being a novice, I am interested in learning the best methods available.
    Thanks!
    Ken
     
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 19, 2005
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    Self employed interpreter/clock repairer
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    I'm sure your title will attract his attention, Ken. Give him time to check back in :)
     
  3. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    May 31, 2005
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    Ken
    I use several methods for machining wheels, gears and pinions.

    When I first started out I used commercial cutters and of course still do where appropriate and available if needed. Unfortunately, they are very expensive and often the formed tooth will not match an original to be duplicated. Even though they still may function, their appearance can stand out like a sore thumb in some cases and not exceptable by some and or their customers.

    Through experimentation, I found that I could easily duplicate a Horological brass wheel tooth form by machining a single point cutter requiring only five cuts with only two being critical. The machining process is easily done on a small milling machine or any milling machine capable of quality work utilizing endmills. Once machined, the cutters are then hardened and tempered as required.

    The process is covered in the NAWCC workshop WS-119.

    Being a two day course on this item and others, its not practical to cover all aspects of cutter construction and its use in few short sentences on a forum such as this.

    An example of a machined cutter can be seen in the attached photo.

    If you PM me with your E-Mail, I can send you a class handout sheet that will give the general idea of its construction.

    Jerry Kieffer

    DSCN4159.JPG
     
  4. Karl Burghart

    Karl Burghart Registered User
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    Jan 30, 2012
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    Jerry's methods work excellent. I was able to make cutters from the handout and make wheels to include a brocot escape wheel. I am also signed up for the next class as well. March 17-18.
     

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