Jauch movement identification and help

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by colonelmustard, Mar 18, 2018.

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  1. colonelmustard

    colonelmustard Registered User

    Mar 17, 2018
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    Good evening from a longtime lurker. I was hoping someone on this board could help me identify the clock that was used with this movement. It is clearly marked "Erhard Jauch Uhrenfabrik Germany" and also the number “3960"

    I bought it just because it intrigued me and I thought maybe I could complete a clock case that my grandpa had built years ago.

    This works great according to my metronome. The large wheel appears to make one full rotation every 24 hours. There is also a lever at the bottom that when you move it forward and back, it moves the arm holding the little nib at the top..

    Anyway, probably is not the movement I had hoped for but would love any information you could provide me with.

    Thanks much.

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  2. chronologiker

    chronologiker Registered User

    Jun 28, 2017
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    Very interesting!

    What does the back look like? And can you show us more photos? Thank you!

    Chronologiker
     
  3. colonelmustard

    colonelmustard Registered User

    Mar 17, 2018
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    Thanks for the reply. This isn't very big. About 4 x 2.5 inches. I have attached a few more pics.

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  4. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Looks just like a clock used in a fish breeding center to automatically feed fish.
     
  5. colonelmustard

    colonelmustard Registered User

    Mar 17, 2018
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    I was thinking some kind of timer as well. Maybe an old kitchen timer. Definitely is accurate and very well made.
     
  6. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

    Jun 24, 2011
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    Are you sure the large wheel only goes around one time in 24 hours?
    If it ever had a dial and hands, it would likely be a military operations clock of some kind.
    Typically used to sync regionally/globally dispersed units to Zulu or GMT time.

    It could very easily be part of a time lock or other switching mechanism that cycles once per day.
     
  7. colonelmustard

    colonelmustard Registered User

    Mar 17, 2018
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    Hmmm, that is an interesting thought. Yes I am sure it goes around only once. I kept an eye on it even yesterday to make sure of that. (small bit of dirt on the wheel that I could track) The metal nib on the arm is another interesting item. It does not move on its own so is not a recording feature (temperature or humidity).
     
  8. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

    Jun 24, 2011
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    I just noticed the electrical contact.
    I'll go with a control mechanism that uses a paper disk (Like a player piano roll) to ground a wire on some other device. Could you get a better pic of the contact and the post that supports it.
     
  9. colonelmustard

    colonelmustard Registered User

    Mar 17, 2018
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    Sure, I don't see it on there...can you describe where I might find it in the pics? Thanks so much for the help
     
  10. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

    Jun 24, 2011
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    I believe it's the part you said doesn't move.
    I'm pretty sure this is what it does because I can see where the paper protected the brass plate that the nib is resting on.
    The contact is that spring-loaded arm at the 12 to 1 o'clock position in your first picture.
    The part of it at 12 o;'clock makes electrical contact with a large plate used to support the disc as it rotates. holes in the disc allow the contact to touch the plate, completing a circuit. It could be a switch for a hot line, if there are two places to make an electrical connection, but the device would probably need to be fully insulated from whatever case it was in. More likely, the movement is part of a larger metal structure and is electrically connected to it. In this case, the ground wire for a motor, solenoid, light or some other electrical device should attach to the contact in a way that insulates the wire from the movement except through the pip at 12 o'clock. Jauch had patents for something like this with a daily and weekly switchable feature. I was unable to find any patent pics for it, though.
     
  11. colonelmustard

    colonelmustard Registered User

    Mar 17, 2018
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    That is very interesting. Clearly not what I needed for grandpa's clock case. :) Might be able to make a 24 hour clock out of it...with one hand or something. I meant to mention, that pushing the lever forward also pushes forward the gear that is mounted under the nib, as well as the nib. Thank you again

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  12. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

    Jun 24, 2011
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    Not exactly what I was envisioning.
    There doesn't appear to be any electrical disconnection between the plate and the contact, through the post the contact is mounted on.
    And that lever at the bottom of the post sure would seem to imply movement of the contact via some kind of cam on the center wheel.
    What happens when you slide the lever? Could this be the clock I saw in the patent that is either one day or one week per rotation?
    It seems obvious that some disc goes on the center arbor to be driven by it.
     
  13. colonelmustard

    colonelmustard Registered User

    Mar 17, 2018
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    1 full rotation of the center wheel per day. Very little winding necessary, I should mention. Not much happens when push the lever forward. Moves the arm with the nib and the gear directly below it, forward. As you can see in these photos, one is when the lever is pushed forward and the other is when it is released. It does not stay in the forward position by itself.

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