Japy Freres & Cie, got this in families estate

sdowney717

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sdowney717

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Ok. Wife thinks Ebay buyer will be trouble. Clock will break, or they will claim it is broke, etc...
 

sdowney717

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Got a lot of videos and photos here
The soap dish on top, the threaded attachment rod had stripped, I soldered the steel rod in place on the dish so nut can hold it on, plus a slight bend in the bronze support column I straightened.

I had it all together, but clock stopped
Took it apart again and mounted to table edge to observe.
Seems 2 things, several tiny pieces of cotton fiber on escape wheel., and the fork which contains the pendulum rod was too loose-wide.
I squeezed it tighter so that interface to rod is closer.
It has now been working for 4 hours, so I say it is good.

https://goo.gl/photos/NVgjdubWmtpwpTCG9
 

JTD

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As far as I can hear from the video, the clock was out of beat when you had it going on the bench. Perhaps it is better now you have it in the case....? Clocks won't go well if they're out of beat and small French clocks like yours are very particular in this respect.

You day the 'fork which contains the pendulum' was too wide. Well, there is supposed to be a small amount of play in that fork between it and the pendulum rod. Again, it's hard to see from the video, but it looks to me as if you have closed it up so that the fork touches the rod. If so, that's too tight.

'Tiny pieces of cotton fiber on the escape wheel' were not helpful, but the whole movement is very dirty and badly needs a complete cleaning and oiling. The dirt is likely a large part of your problem. However, if you are going to see the clock, you could leave that for someone else to do. If your wife is worried about shipping it through E-Bay, why not put it on Craigslist and have the buyer collect it?

JTD
 

sdowney717

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As far as I can hear from the video, the clock was out of beat when you had it going on the bench. Perhaps it is better now you have it in the case....? Clocks won't go well if they're out of beat and small French clocks like yours are very particular in this respect.

You day the 'fork which contains the pendulum' was too wide. Well, there is supposed to be a small amount of play in that fork between it and the pendulum rod. Again, it's hard to see from the video, but it looks to me as if you have closed it up so that the fork touches the rod. If so, that's too tight.

'Tiny pieces of cotton fiber on the escape wheel' were not helpful, but the whole movement is very dirty and badly needs a complete cleaning and oiling. The dirt is likely a large part of your problem. However, if you are going to see the clock, you could leave that for someone else to do. If your wife is worried about shipping it through E-Bay, why not put it on Craigslist and have the buyer collect it?

JTD
I did get it running on the bench, if out of beat then due to its circular frame and hard to line up perfect.
It has run all night back in it's bronze case. Seems to sound ok.

The fork was real loose. I had been thinking over 100 years of rubbing wear steel on brass.
My thought was the pendulum rod with too much play won't be pushing the fork far enough each way to keep the escape wheel running.
And was part of me trying to figure out why it kept stopping.:)

Rod still has some clearance., and is free in the fork, actually think it is perfect fit now.
My technique to tighten was, use a small screwdriver, slip into outer part of fork, then squeeze at rear of fork with vice grips.
This takes a somewhat delicate approach, the screwdriver keeps it from squeezing at the front which will form an angular pinch.
It is tighter and fork is perfectly parallel to each tine now.
Also the fork was slightly crooked, at an angle. To straighten, grasped in vice grips and tuned it leftward to line it up perpendicular to the frame.

The cotton fibers were my own fault. After I oiled the clock, I dried up extra oil using a cotton swab on the wheel, which left fibers behind. Had to use a lens and tweezers to pull them off.
My advice, don't use any cotton swabs. Using cotton was my attempt to figure out why it kept stopping, I was thinking could oil drops stop the escape wheel due to excess fluid friction. But I don't think so now.
Paper towels rolled up much better for drying excess oil.

Someone had been in this clock. And the bell was striking off 30 minutes, half hour bell struck on the hour and the hours on the half hours.
I pulled off minute hand and moved it 180* and now it strikes like it should, hours on the hour, and 30 minutes on the half hour.

This clock sat in wife's parents house since 1960's and I don't think they ever ran it. I never saw him run any of his clocks. I think he bought overseas when stationed in France.

Another clock I got from him is a Vienna wall clock from 1890. I had to oil mechanism and reglue and repair and refinish the wood case. I checked the serial and mechanism is from 1870, Gustav Becker.
Wife likes that one.
 
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JTD

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Looks as if you got the closure of the fork right - as I said, it was hard to see from the video, I just thought it looked too close.

Glad you got the strike right. Being half an hour out doesn't necessarily mean that someone 'had been in' your clock. If you turn the minute hand too quickly without letting it strike on the half, then you will get yourself half an hour out, like you were.

I have to say I started out half agreeing with your wife, I don't think it is the most beautiful clock I've seen, but I like the dial very much and I think that if the case was cleaned up it would look quite good. I have never really been a fan of the 'soap dish' top, but you did a good job fixing back. And the birds at the sides are nice and a bit unusual....the more I think about it, the more I am beginning to like it quite a lot!

JTD
 

sdowney717

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Looks as if you got the closure of the fork right - as I said, it was hard to see from the video, I just thought it looked too close.

Glad you got the strike right. Being half an hour out doesn't necessarily mean that someone 'had been in' your clock. If you turn the minute hand too quickly without letting it strike on the half, then you will get yourself half an hour out, like you were.

I have to say I started out half agreeing with your wife, I don't think it is the most beautiful clock I've seen, but I like the dial very much and I think that if the case was cleaned up it would look quite good. I have never really been a fan of the 'soap dish' top, but you did a good job fixing back. And the birds at the sides are nice and a bit unusual....the more I think about it, the more I am beginning to like it quite a lot!

JTD
I also like the clock face very much, it is very attractive. The jewel glass numerals are copper wire tied in the back onto the front brass mechanism plate.

The swans have a lot of detail cast into the bronze.
This clock is very solidly built. Think about how this is over 150 years old, made around time of the USA civil war, and is keeping perfect time, has not gained a minute in almost 2 days of running.
Tick - tock sound is also very quiet.
This is a quality clock for sure.
 

sdowney717

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I added some more detailed photos into the album of the swans, and looks like a wolf or lion head on the dish?
Small ringlets so maybe used to be a bronze chain?

20170325_133640.jpg

20170325_133630.jpg

20170325_133616.jpg

20170325_133810.jpg
 
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JTD

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Yes, little chains. But I don't think you really need them.

JTD
 

timepast

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Glad you have it running . Yes a good clean and oil will do wonders. I think it`s a pretty clock but beauty is very subjective. Breakage is always a possiblity even with great care in packing. Some times the shippers are not careful. Best to have insurance coverage.
 

sdowney717

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Wife is sort of not talking much about the clock, so maybe I get to keep it.
a year ago her father died, so she has been cleaning up 2 houses worth of clutter and stuff, so she was viewing the 'ugly clock' as just more clutter stuff coming into our house.

Over the past week of time, It is running slightly fast, gained 8 minutes, there is an adjustment on the face at the top, which way to turn and slow it down?
 
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JTD

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Yes, there is an adjustment (the tiny arbor above the 12). However, this is for very fine adjustment only, first you have to get you clock keeping fairly good time by moving the pendulum bob up and down (use the tiny screw on the bob). Once you have the clock keeping good (but not perfect) time you can make tiny adjustments with the arbor above the 12. Turn it clockwise for faster and anti-clockwise for slower.

Hope this helps. (Glad your wife seems to be growing to like the clock).

JTD
 

sdowney717

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Does the screw in the bob simply bite the rod?
I suppose mark the rod, loosen screw and drop it maybe 2 mm or so?
 

sdowney717

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It has been keeping excellent time, maybe within 2 minutes a week.
I let it run down. Then it was striking the hours on the half hours and half hours on the hours.

I found out turning it past the strike fast thereby not letting it finish the strike, you can sync it properly to strike hours on hours. Then you move the hour hand to the correct hour.
 

sdowney717

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I cleaned the brass of the clock, it cleaned up very well in white vinegar, a nylon dish scrunge and dish soap. Some areas I sanded to remove some deeper corrosion marks. I took it all apart. The brass nuts were all hand made. I added some pics to the end of the album.
I used a SS brush to clean out the tiny carved areas, etc. There was some kind of black like substance sitting in many grooves. Several internal parts are stamped '65', which I take to mean it is from 1865
And there were old finger prints on the back side, Imagine civil war people handling this clock.
The steel key is a number 7, would an original key have been brass?

The vinegar did not discolor much to green, the brass may be better quality than today, dont know. And the clock never turned pinkish

1614454696801.png
 
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sdowney717

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So after three years the wife decided you could keep it? I like it!
Yes she did. She likes it better now that it is cleaned up, still thinks it is just too gaudy looking.
I found a 156 yr old manufacturing defect. The right swan top wings did not lay flat against the side. Whoever built it, did not file enough off the side of swan where it meets the shelf near the stud nut to let it fit at the right angle, so I used my dremel and it fits perfectly now.
 
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Steven Thornberry

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I will defer to those who know better, but are you sure that "65" actually denotes a year (1865), rather than a sort of control number to ensure that all parts that are to go together are kept and put together?
 
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zedric

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I will defer to those who know better, but are you sure that "65" actually denotes a year (1865), rather than a sort of control number to ensure that all parts that are to go together are kept and put together?
I would say it is the latter. It was not usual practice to stamp the date on all parts!
 

JTD

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I will defer to those who know better, but are you sure that "65" actually denotes a year (1865), rather than a sort of control number to ensure that all parts that are to go together are kept and put together?
I would say it is the latter. It was not usual practice to stamp the date on all parts!
I agree with both - I doubt very much this is the year.

JTD
 

Chris Radano

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I would think the clock dates around 1885-90. This style was very modern at that time, maybe still. To me there is a melding of older clock styles and industrialism. Think "Eiffel Tower".
I think it could be possibly up to 10 years earlier. There was a distinct style similar your clock, if you browse auctions and the internet you will see other clocks done in this style.
Great job, the case looks fab.

I would appreciate it if you could describe a bit more of your cleaning process, i.e. did you soak parts in vinegar, and then go over the parts with dish soap? With these two materials there is an acid and alkaline dynamic.
 
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sdowney717

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I would think the clock dates around 1885-90. This style was very modern at that time, maybe still. To me there is a melding of older clock styles and industrialism. Think "Eiffel Tower".
Great job, the case looks fab.

I would appreciate it if you could describe a bit more of your cleaning process, i.e. did you soak parts in vinegar, and then go over the parts with dish soap? With these two materials there is an acid and alkaline dynamic.
Take whole clock apart
Fill plastic dish tub with a gallon of white vinegar
Wash parts with soap, rinse
Soak parts in vinegar half the day maybe 4 hours, of course not all can fit at once
Then to polish, one part at a time
Rinse off one part with water
Used a green nylon scrunge with dish soap to scrub hard the brass, the scrunge was worn, but it is one of those scratchy dish green rectangular flat type, they make various kinds of these scrunges, when new it will feel abrasive, but when worn less abrasive.
Then for some areas for this black stuck on dirt in grooves, a SS brush
And for some smooth flat areas, worn down piece of 400 grit sand paper, followed by 5000, then 10000 grit sand paper.
I would not have used a new piece of 400 grit, morel likely 1000 grit is what it had turned into.

No need for machine polishing with any compound.
 
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sdowney717

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Oh no! A bad penny (from the mint) is worth more than a good one.

Did you ever get a photo or discription of the missing chains?
No, I don't remember any, but I think the hung down off those loops on each side Likely something similar could easily be put on and look authentic.
 

sdowney717

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I will defer to those who know better, but are you sure that "65" actually denotes a year (1865), rather than a sort of control number to ensure that all parts that are to go together are kept and put together?
Out of all these parts making up the clock, the '65' stamping is only on 3 of them, all on flat parts normally invisible unless taken apart.
The feet bolted to the base, are all slightly different drilled holes. So they are not interchangeable as the holes dont align. I was able to remove all nuts except the ones holding on the feet, they were jammed tight. I think whoever assembled this, over tightened them, so they came out with their studs, and all the tapped holes differ in depth, so it was fun putting it back together.
All the nuts are hand made, and a chisel separated them. They appear to have been cast as a flat bar, drilled, tapped, then chiseled apart. It made for a hard time to take apart. On the interior nuts inside the tower, I dremeled 2 sides of the wider ones so as to fit a 3/8 open end wrench, otherwise I could not have gotten it tight together.
 
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Chris Radano

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Well, I will adjust the dating of your clock from my previous post. I think it is 1875-85.
I think you could consider your clock "aesthetic movement".


Here is a similar-styled clock, where it has a chain strung on the top. You can probably find a small brass chain at your local Ace Hardware. I think 2 swags on each side toward the center would be appropriate.
 

sdowney717

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Well, I will adjust the dating of your clock from my previous post. I think it is 1875-85.
I think you could consider your clock "aesthetic movement".


Here is a similar-styled clock, where it has a chain strung on the top. You can probably find a small brass chain at your local Ace Hardware. I think 2 swags on each side toward the center would be appropriate.
How many of these clocks are still around?
How many of my clock do you think were made?
They have made so many clocks and so many look entirely different, ever seen 2 or more of the same clock?
Were they custom ordered for each customer? Or ordered from a catalog?
Has anyone ever seen the same clock duplicated?
 

Chris Radano

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Nobody knows exactly how many were made and how many are still around. You are correct, the French made a lot of clocks in the 19th century. Part of the reason a lot of French clocks survive is because they were generally quality made.
I look a lot at auctions and in general for clocks on the internet. Yes, every once in a while I see 2 or more of the same clock. Some styles were popular worldwide, so more were manufactured.
Sometimes it seems like a lot of French clock cases are very similar, but not exactly the same.
I don't recall seeing a clock exactly like yours. I recognize the style. I imagine more like yours were made, but how many are around nobody knows. There may be a few that are held on to by families through the generations, that never are offered for sale. Therefore, there are limited pics available on the internet and other sources.
 
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FatrCat

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The '65' you're finding on the inside of parts of the cabinet housing will relate to the casting mold or model of the cabinet. This was quite common with cast metal housings. The French clock movement makers just weren't into dating their wares for some reason. Usually about the closest you'll come to actually 'dating' this type of clock will be the Paris Expo stamp. What they were often more meticulous about was marking front and rear bezels, and sometimes additional parts with the movement's serial number, which on yours is '840' shown in your 2nd photo. You'll likely find that number on the outer edge of the front bezel when removed, and possibly on the rear bezel as well. Those are always a good 'tell' of whether all components are original or if something has been replaced over the years. Very nice piece; I'd imagine it originally would have been an ormolu finish, a gold plating method, which would have been quite stunning.

I can't say that I've seen this exact style before, but it definitely strikes me as one of those which was pretty closely copied by some American clock makers.
 
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sdowney717

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The '65' you're finding on the inside of parts of the cabinet housing will relate to the casting mold or model of the cabinet. This was quite common with cast metal housings. The French clock movement makers just weren't into dating their wares for some reason. Usually about the closest you'll come to actually 'dating' this type of clock will be the Paris Expo stamp. What they were often more meticulous about was marking front and rear bezels, and sometimes additional parts with the movement's serial number, which on yours is '840' shown in your 2nd photo. You'll likely find that number on the outer edge of the front bezel when removed, and possibly on the rear bezel as well. Those are always a good 'tell' of whether all components are original or if something has been replaced over the years. Very nice piece; I'd imagine it originally would have been an ormolu finish, a gold plating method, which would have been quite stunning.

I can't say that I've seen this exact style before, but it definitely strikes me as one of those which was pretty closely copied by some American clock makers.
Yes the front glass brass frame piece has an engraved marking on the top, hidden when it is attached to the clock framework. I noticed it but did not record what the number was.

I also just noticed that '840' number is also on the pendulum bob weight, same as the back plate of the mechanism, so it matches. picture 5 shows that. What is the '411' stamped number at the bottom pin on the back plate?

One thing it is missing is a brass hinge pin for the front glass face frame. A PO used a too thin small steel nail The rear pin is fine, and looks longer. It is really un-noticeable except when you open the glass.

I have had it running for days since I put it together. It is very sensitive to being moved as in stopping within 5 minutes. The level is critical to get it to beat correctly. If I move to another table, it may not be perfectly level, so I slightly twist the clock mechanism in the frame till it beats correctly, then it remains running fine.

I also noticed if I wind it, it may stop. I figure cause the pendulum is short and does not have much swing energy. It runs a long time between windings, is this an 8 day spring?
 
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sdowney717

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http://www.floridaantiquesappraisers.com/ormolu.shtml (christianregency.com)
ormolu was deadly to clockmaker, they had to heat the mercury-gold mixture applied to brass, then the mercury fumes got them.
What I thought interesting on this clock I have, the ornate metal brass face behind the glass around the hands never tarnished, and seemed slightly different to me, looked more like gold. So maybe that is ormolu plated.
When looking close at it, it is very fine and crisp looking with all the detail having sharp edges, not looking like it was painted, more like an electroplate would look if it is plated.
 

Betzel

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What is the '411' stamped number at the bottom pin on the back plate?
A fine fellow over at the BHI once informed me this is the pendulum length in French Imperial inches (pouce, prior to their adoption of the metric system). Because the separator is where it is, it means 4.11 inches. These French inches were ~27.07 mm according to wikipedia. If it is keeping time well with the current pendulum, you won't have to do the math ;-)

If you look at http://www.theindex.nawcc.org/Articles/Dean-french.pdf you can see how your particular suspension works, and it can help add confidence in dating the piece.

Also, these were generally very (no, extremely) well made. If you are confident servicing the movement, a good cleaning and inspection with proper repairs and lubrication will give it another 150 years of service. Mine will run more than 3 weeks on a full wind with what may be the original springs. The pivots in these are usually extremely thin and extremely hard, so keep that in mind as they are, eh, very delicate. Usually, they will clean up to a mirror finish if you go slowly. Also, note the dots on the bridges will align with their locations, to aid in proper reassembly. It's nice when someone anticipates you coming in to take care of what they built?
 
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sdowney717

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A fine fellow over at the BHI once informed me this is the pendulum length in French Imperial inches (pouce, prior to their adoption of the metric system). Because the separator is where it is, it means 4.11 inches. These French inches were ~27.07 mm according to wikipedia. If it is keeping time well with the current pendulum, you won't have to do the math ;-)

If you look at http://www.theindex.nawcc.org/Articles/Dean-french.pdf you can see how your particular suspension works, and it can help add confidence in dating the piece.

Also, these were generally very (no, extremely) well made. If you are confident servicing the movement, a good cleaning and inspection with proper repairs and lubrication will give it another 150 years of service. Mine will run more than 3 weeks on a full wind with what may be the original springs. The pivots in these are usually extremely thin and extremely hard, so keep that in mind as they are, eh, very delicate. Usually, they will clean up to a mirror finish if you go slowly. Also, note the dots on the bridges will align with their locations, to aid in proper reassembly. It's nice when someone anticipates you coming in to take care of what they built?
Very useful, mine has the spring detent clip on a pendulum height adjustment, so 1865 or later.
And uses the count wheel, so prior to 1880
Date between 1865 to 1879 then.

Dating by use of a Count Wheel (or Locking Wheel) versus Rack & Snail Prior to ~1880 a count wheel
I suppose clock mechanism might be older than clock frame.
Took a video of it running from the rear port window
 

sdowney717

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From the info pdf file, and since the plate is stamped as shown for 1867, and not 1873
I think it it is likely between those years of 1867 to 1872, Logically it makes sense to me.

1867 - Grande Med d’Honneur, Expo Universelle Paris
1873 - Grd Diploma d' Merit, Expo Universelle Vienna
 

sdowney717

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I let the chime spring run down and now the chimes are 30 minutes off. So when it is 30 minutes, it chimes the hour, and at 60 minutes the half hour.

what is the way to reset that?
 

Betzel

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What I do is stick my finger through the back hole and raise the hammer manually, which lets it run forward to the next count - you may need to run it through a whole 12 hour cycle to re-sync. This action releases the lock on the count wheel as though the warning mechanism has activated. German (and some other) clocks have a wire/lever (or cord) attached to the arm which does the same thing, and it was carried forward (I think) even after the rack and snail replaced the count wheel. I don't think it is the "blind" function (like a repeater) but it still functions in this way, for the rack and snail. For the count wheel, it lets you re-sync ;-)

Try it and let us know?
 
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sdowney717

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What I do is stick my finger through the back hole and raise the hammer manually, which lets it run forward to the next count - you may need to run it through a whole 12 hour cycle to re-sync. This action releases the lock on the count wheel as though the warning mechanism has activated. German (and some other) clocks have a wire/lever (or cord) attached to the arm which does the same thing, and it was carried forward (I think) even after the rack and snail replaced the count wheel. I don't think it is the "blind" function (like a repeater) but it still functions in this way, for the rack and snail. For the count wheel, it lets you re-sync ;-)

Try it and let us know?
tried it and no it does nothing. I think the last time this happened, I removed the minute hand and rotated it 180 degrees. Must be an easier way.
Ok the idea is sound get the count wheel to move. The solution is lift the stopper arm and let the count wheel start counting the chimes, then set the hour hand to match the chime count, then either stop clock and wait for time to catch up to clock, or move hands until it matches the correct time. next to the hammer arm on the count wheel, is a steel catch, lift it and it chimes the hour.
Still kind of a pain to do, I wonder how many people who used these clocks hundred years ago knew what to do?

That steel stopper arm is right above the hammer arm pivot

1614897539838.png
 
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sdowney717

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And you can rotate the hammer on the arm to strike the bell properly. You want the arm to hit the bell and bounce back slightly above the bell to get the nice tone.
 

Betzel

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All clocks with a count wheel can come out of sync, which is why the rack and snail are predominant today.

I suppose users did (and do) many things to re-sync, including repositioning the minute and hour hands, etc. But, removing hands frequently is risky and chews things up. Eventually, fine taper pins get lost. Chew marks on nuts from kitchen pliers, paper clip taper pins and loose hour hand collars, etc. are all too common.

Maybe set the time for 5 minutes past the next hour, carefully listening to the strike sequence. Find a longer wood skewer or matchstick and cut a 45 degree angle on the end with a paring knife to see if you can actuate the "steel stopper arm" from the back? Hold it up until the strike corrects. Be careful, as it will slip. Yes, the hammer can be adjusted to get whatever strike position and force you think creates the best strike tone. Too much adjusting (including all the people before you) will fatigue it, prompting replacement ;-)

Temporary solutions tend to become permanent. If the movement has yet to be properly serviced, I hope you see why we are all so adamant about proper cleaning, inspection, remedial action as needed, lubrication and final adjustment. It's the one thing I suspect we all agree on here.
 

agemo

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Hi,
Read this, it's very interesting, for example the Japy factory in Badevel produced 9 to 10,000 movements per month in 1865.
It's in French but with a good translator (DeepL "it's not advertising, it's a statement of fact.") no problem.

Patrimoine: Badevel - Usine d'horlogerie Japy Frères et Cie

To note that on this site other articles are interesting, they are archives of the patrimony.

Amicalement GG
 

sdowney717

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All clocks with a count wheel can come out of sync, which is why the rack and snail are predominant today.

I suppose users did (and do) many things to re-sync, including repositioning the minute and hour hands, etc. But, removing hands frequently is risky and chews things up. Eventually, fine taper pins get lost. Chew marks on nuts from kitchen pliers, paper clip taper pins and loose hour hand collars, etc. are all too common.

Maybe set the time for 5 minutes past the next hour, carefully listening to the strike sequence. Find a longer wood skewer or matchstick and cut a 45 degree angle on the end with a paring knife to see if you can actuate the "steel stopper arm" from the back? Hold it up until the strike corrects. Be careful, as it will slip. Yes, the hammer can be adjusted to get whatever strike position and force you think creates the best strike tone. Too much adjusting (including all the people before you) will fatigue it, prompting replacement ;-)

Temporary solutions tend to become permanent. If the movement has yet to be properly serviced, I hope you see why we are all so adamant about proper cleaning, inspection, remedial action as needed, lubrication and final adjustment. It's the one thing I suspect we all agree on here.
You can reach in with a long pen or pencil and trip the lever up to let the count wheel move. But you need a flashlight, have to turn the clock around to see what your doing. The hour hand slips slides on the shaft easily enough. Taking off minute hand is like a brute force fix, too much work.
 

sdowney717

Registered User
Mar 23, 2017
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Hi,
Read this, it's very interesting, for example the Japy factory in Badevel produced 9 to 10,000 movements per month in 1865.
It's in French but with a good translator (DeepL "it's not advertising, it's a statement of fact.") no problem.

Patrimoine: Badevel - Usine d'horlogerie Japy Frères et Cie

To note that on this site other articles are interesting, they are archives of the patrimony.

Amicalement GG
So about when my clock was made, the company was at it's height in popularity.

The factory employed 80 workers in 1820, 380 workers in 1826, 670 workers in 1865, 395 in 1912 and 476 in 1926.​
Then the Great Depression killed them, and they were out of business in 1935.

At some point electric clocks become the must own clocks.
Fewer buyers in the Great Depression, as at least 25% were unemployed, knowing the proper time was a luxury.
Companies that did not adapt would have failed.
 

agemo

Registered User
Apr 5, 2011
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SAINT-NAZAIRE - FRANCE
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So about when my clock was made, the company was at it's height in popularity.

The factory employed 80 workers in 1820, 380 workers in 1826, 670 workers in 1865, 395 in 1912 and 476 in 1926.​
Then the Great Depression killed them, and they were out of business in 1935.

At some point electric clocks become the must own clocks.
Fewer buyers in the Great Depression, as at least 25% were unemployed, knowing the proper time was a luxury.
Companies that did not adapt would have failed.
Yes, but only for the Badevel factory ! There were other manufacturing sites.

Amicalement GG
 

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