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J C Brown Clock

Kim St.Dennis Sr.

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I just picked up a very nice circa 1849 JC Brown Connecticut Shelf clock at the California Southwest Regional. Tom Spittler's book "American Clockmakers & Watchmakers" states that J C Brown used his name or "Forestville Mfg. Co." on dials of his clock from 1842 to 1849.



The clock is in very good shape, but it is missing the release button on the side of the case for the bezel. Does anyone have one of these or a photo of the button mechanism? 76929.jpg 76953.jpg 76928.jpg 76955.jpg 76956.jpg 76957.jpg 76958.jpg 76959.jpg 76960.jpg
 

specop

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Sorry I can't help with the missing button.

I collect J C Brown clocks but don't have this model. A number of his shelf clocks had Brewster movements and I wonder what movement your clock has?
Specop
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Very nice! I especially like the rosewood with gilt stencil decorated case and that nice signed dial. My recollection is they're diminutive clocks, about 15-16 inches tall which makes them more desirable.

Any pics available of the back board off the clock to show the label and movement in situ?

Bailey and Spittler is a good starting point for researching clocks. If you crave more after whetting your appetite, there's a great softcover book by Ken Roberts and Snowden Taylor, Jonathan Clark Brown and the Forestville Manufacturing Company. Lots of info, a great chart of the chronology of his various firms, lots of pictures of clocks and movements.

Another book, or maybe more accurately described as a pamphlet, is Selected Items from the James Waldron Collection of Clocks. This is a souvenir of the 2004 S. Ohio Regional with photos of clocks from a display there devoted to J.C. Brown. Some nifty stuff. A clock like yours is shown on page 18.

Steve and Harold: any interest in a J.C. Brown/Forestville thread with sticky? This clock could be the first one on it. By creation of such a thread, I can only hope that some great stuff would be enticed out of the wood work as some of the products of these companies are wonderful and very collectible.

RM
 

Steven Thornberry

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If Kim has no objection to using his thread for that purpose, I can place a link to this thread in the sticky at the top of the forum.

Clarification: Do you want it strictly JC Brown or just anything with a Forestville label up to the point Welch bought it out? I am assuming the latter.
 

harold bain

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Good idea, RM. Probably should include all the companies he was connected with, Steven.:thumb:
 

Kim St.Dennis Sr.

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Steve, I think its a great idea! I think the thread should cover anything JC Brown or Forestville Mfg. Co.. Spittler's book has Forestville Mfg. Co. starting in 1835 and sold to E.N. Welch in 1855. J.C. used both names on his clocks. I will take more detailed photos of the back broad and movement post them today
 

Steven Thornberry

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So be it. It shows up as "J.C. Brown/Forestville Mfg. Co."
 

harold bain

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The printer's address at 1 State Street narrows it to 1847-1849, according to Roberts and Taylor's JC Brown and the Forestville Manufacturing Company, page 23.
 

Steven Thornberry

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This is a simple Forestville Manufacturing Company 8-day weight-driven clock. The case and movement are in good shape. The bottom glass seems (in my limited experience) to have a peculiar theme for a clock of this era (see below), and while it appears to have been on the clock for quite a while, I am not sure it is original. Any thoughts?

The label appears to be the same as shown in Kenneth Roberts’ Contributions of Joseph Ives to Connecticut Clock Technology, page 175. He dates that label to 1841-43, when the three men mentioned (E.N. Welch, J.C. Brown, and Chauncey Pomeroy) were partners in the company. Apparently, Pomeroy died September 15, 1843 (again, per Roberts). Unfortunately, the label in my clock lacks the part that would have shown the three names. I suppose some of the labels could have continued to be used for a brief period after Pomeroy's death. I also don’t really know if Forestville ever used the same label without these names, but I would suspect not. In any event, I would date the clock to before 1850.

Forestville OG.jpg Tablet.jpg Tablet Back.jpg Movement.jpg Label.jpg
 
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rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Steven Thornberry;509284 said:
This is a simple Forestville Manufacturing Company 8-day weight-driven clock. The case and movement are in good shape. The bottom glass seems (in my limited experience) to have a peculiar theme for a clock of this era (see below), and while it appears to have been on the clock for quite a while, I am not sure it is original. Any thoughts?

The label appears to be the same as shown in Kenneth Roberts’ Contributions of Joseph Ives to Connecticut Clock Technology, page 175. He dates that label to 1841-43, when the three men mentioned (E.N. Welch, J.C. Brown, and Chauncey Pomeroy) were partners in the company. Apparently, Pomeroy died September 15, 1843 (again, per Roberts). Unfortunately, the label in my clock lacks the part that would have shown the three names. I suppose some of the labels could have continued to be used for a brief period after Pomeroy's death. I also don’t really know if Forestville ever used the same label without these names, but I would suspect not. In any event, I would date the clock to before 1850.
The glass is a folky nautical scene which appears to have been hand painted by someone with ample skill. I especially like the handling of the sky and choppy sea. It's a very attractive work of art in and of itself!

So though my suspicion is that it's probably not original to the clock based upon it's theme, appearance, and the way it's retained in the door, you have a clock with a nice little painting! Something that's pleasing to the eye in my opinion.

RM
 

Steven Thornberry

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Thanks, RM, for confirming what I thought to be correct. It is, as you state, a pleasant painting, and I think it does not detract from the clock.
 

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A great chunk of rosewood, and the gold decoration is just great. Very, very good stuff is showing up these days, both at Marts and on eBay, as well as at local and regional auctions. Prices are more than reasonable on a lot of this stuff, which bodes ill for our widow's or widower's yard sales, but good for us in the present.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Very interesting, indeed.

The movement is an unmarked 8 day time and strike pendulum movement by Terry, Downs, Burwell & Co or the later Terry, Downs & Co! Not what I expected to see. I didn't know that he was a user of these movements. Comments anyone??

For more about this maker and examples of a 30 hour balance wheel time only movement and a marked 8 day time and strike pendulum movement by them, see the postings on the earlier thread

https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=66243&highlight=terry%2C+downs%2C+burwell

Within there are links to Bulletin references about this maker as well.

Looking carefully at the pics of the back board, don't see any evidence that there was another movement.

Also what I find interesting is it doesn't appear that there ever was a label. Instead, the portion of the back board behind the pendulum and seen through the oculus for the pendulum is given a simple black wash. I've seen this treatment many times in the wooden boxes containing the movements of iron fronts.

Finally areas of the back of the front of the case and the underside of the top were relieved to accommodate the movement's pendulum and fan, repectively. All with consistent oxidation suggesting that it was done at the time of manufacture.

Interesting!

RM

PS: nice clocks specop. Always wanted one of those papier mache clocks...but I get trounced when they come up for auction.
 

harold bain

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Good eye, RM. That distinctive escapewheel bridge had me looking through a few books for a match.
I've seen somewhat similar style cases by Brown, but never with the pendulum window like Kim's clock.
 

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harold bain;509272 said:
The printer's address at 1 State Street narrows it to 1847-1849, according to Roberts and Taylor's JC Brown and the Forestville Manufacturing Company, page 23.
Thanks, Harold.

Regards.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Thought I would post a ripple steeple similar to one that specop posted earlier.

The case is a standard steeple in terms of size. It is rosewood and rosewood veneer on pine. The door is is not rippled and bevels outward. It retains it's original turned bone knob.

The divided door retains both original glasses. The lower tablet has a free hand geometric design which I think is rather attractive.

The inner back board bears the printed paper label of the Forestville Manufacturing Company. Only J.C. Brown is listed. Also note the date of Sept., 1848 (it's partially covered by the gong base). The label states "springs with equalizing power, warrented not to fail". Odd, this would be the label for a fusee clock.

The signed movement is steel spring driven brass 8 day time and strike. Notice that the the escape wheel bridge has a flat tip and flat tapering sides. It has a 24 hour count wheel. A thorough examination leaves little question in my mind that this has been the only movement ever housed in this case.

The white painted metal dial with black Roman numerals is signed at the peak (now faint). Something I found curious about this dial is that it is held in place with a wood crossbar. The top of the dial and the upper support block behind it, which appears absolutely undisturbed and original, never had a screw hole.

A virtually identical clock with the same movement is illustrated on page 28, figures 23a and b in Roberts and Taylor in Johnathan Clark Brown and the Forestville Manufacturing Co. For the sake of convenience, this reference will be referred to as "Roberts and Taylor" and Forestville Manufacturing Co as "FMC".

By 1847 FMC was under the sole management of J.C. Brown. According to Roberts and Taylor the movement in this clock is considered an earlier one and the first true spring driven FMC movement. They state that in 1847 or shortly thereafter, it was redesigned with a differently shaped escape wheel bridge. However, there is patent date on the label of September 1848 (of note, no patent can be found that was granted for that date) and also as per Roberts and Taylor, the Wells' Steam Press at 26 State Street in Hartford is listed in directories from 1849-1.

Now what about that label? A careful survey of the picures in Roberts and Taylor reveals its use in both fusee and non-fusee clocks! See page 28, figure 23 b. Though dark and with some losses, upon careful examination, the label appears to be the same as in this clock. See page 41, figure 34b showing the label in a non-fusee ripple beehive. Albeit not the same label, but note it includes the same assurance about the springs with equalizing power warrented not to fail. Also see Ball, American Shelf and Wall Clocks, page 100. Another ripple non-fusee steeple with yet another label with the same assurance of springs with equalizing power warranted not to fail! Apparently Brown used labels with this statement in both fusee and non-fusee clocks.

What about the dial?. See the clock referred to in Ball. I don't see a screw at the peak there either.

So those of you with J.C. Brown ripples, please go back and look carefully at the movements, dials and labels. Report what you find.

RM 77302.jpg 77303.jpg 77304.jpg 77305.jpg 77306.jpg
 
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Steven Thornberry

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At some point, I believe, Birge, Peck, & Co. merged with J.C. Brown. And, of course, S.C. Spring was successor to Birge, Peck & Co. On the basis of this tenuous ancestry (and to stanch the tears in RM's eyes, all too evident from another thread), I will post this clock, a column and cornice by Solomon C. Spring, mid to late 1860's.

Both original glasses were gone and the replacements that were first used by whomever were totally unacceptable. A putrid shade of orange. The bottom glass is now an old reverse painted piece, while the middle section is an old mirror. At first I was not sure the mirror would appeal to me, but overtime, I have found it is not at all bad. Whether a mirror is appropriate for an SC Spring 3-decker column and cornice is another matter. The dial opening on this clock is of a type that was also found in Birge, Peck and, I believe, JC Brown. The train on the label, of course, is Puffin' Betsy, as I learned thanks to Sooth. I deck the clock out for Christmas.:Party:

SC Spring Column 04.jpg SC Spring Column movement 001.jpg SC Spring Column 003.jpg Spring Nutcracker.jpg
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Steven Thornberry;513120 said:
At some point, I believe, Birge, Peck, & Co. merged with J.C. Brown. And, of course, S.C. Spring was successor to Birge, Peck & Co. On the basis of this tenuous ancestry (and to stanch the tears in RM's eyes, all too evident from another thread), I will post this clock, a column and cornice by Solomon C. Spring, mid to late 1860's.

Both original glasses were gone and the replacements that were first used by whomever were totally unacceptable. A putrid shade of orange. The bottom glass is now an old reverse painted piece, while the middle section is an old mirror. At first I was not sure the mirror would appeal to me, but overtime, I have found it is not at all bad. Whether a mirror is appropriate for an SC Spring 3-decker column and cornice is another matter. The dial opening on this clock is of a type that was also found in Birge, Peck and, I believe, JC Brown. The train on the label, of course, is Puffin' Betsy, as I learned thanks to Sooth. I deck the clock out for Christmas.:Party:
Sniff, sniff...you've made me...sniff, sniff... so happy..sniff, sniff...I'm gonna cry again...LOL!

Actually, interesting clock. Don't see many of this case style with that little outboard alarm movement on that cute little cast iron bell. Nice.

RM
 

harold bain

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I've always liked the Ives brass strap movements with the rolling pinions. They do seem to have longevity. Nice clock, Steven.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Thought I would post a J.C. Brown "onion top".

The case is rosewood and rosewood veneer on pine with ripple molding. Untouched crusty old or original finish. Nope, won't refinish.

The original tablet is, in my opinion, a rather nice ground and frosted tablet. Door retains original turned bone knob.

The zinc dial is white painted with black Roman numerals. It is signed "J.C. Brown, Bristol, Ct", albeit somewhat faintly with some flakes. Nope, won't "restore".

The works is brass steel spring 8 day time and strike. Note the "outboard" brass steel spring alarm movement.

This is the first ripple front I had ever purchased.

There must be more J.C. Brown/Forestville clocks worthy of posting. Please do so.

RM 78475.jpg 78476.jpg 78477.jpg 78478.jpg
 

specop

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Here are a couple of clocks with a portrait of the great man himself on the glasses, the first also has his name on the dial and written in gold at bottom centre of the case. 78530.jpg 77042.jpg
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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specop;513843 said:
Here are a couple of clocks with a portrait of the great man himself on the glasses, the first also has his name on the dial and written in gold at bottom centre of the case.
Very nice!

RM
 

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Here's a J.C. Brown ironfront wall clock, with an octagonal wood surround. Most of the translucent paint remains on the mother-of-pearl inlay. The movement, however, is gone. It should be a Pomeroy marine movement with the balance wheel above the top plate, visible through the large hole in the dial. I've been looking for a long time. 78614.jpg 78615.jpg
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Jeremy Woodoff;514204 said:
Here's a J.C. Brown ironfront wall clock, with an octagonal wood surround. Most of the translucent paint remains on the mother-of-pearl inlay. The movement, however, is gone. It should be a Pomeroy marine movement with the balance wheel above the top plate, visible through the large hole in the dial. I've been looking for a long time.
Holy smokes would you look at that!

I think it's a very unsual form. The paint is great. As you point out great how the MOP still retains the original translucent paint...the way they were meant to be and usally gone.

Being who I am and how unusual it is, I gotta ask...is the wood surround original? It sure looks old and "good".

I hope you find the movement. Be patient. It took me many years to find a pair of period hands for a particular clock, and when I did, it was worth it. You never know.

RM
 

Jeremy Woodoff

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RM, I see no reason to think the wood surround is not original, other than never having seen another like it. Age, workmanship, finish all seem compatible with the iron part.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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A very nice example of a JC Brown papier mache "ogee" clock has been posted earlier on this thread.

JC Brown/Forestville made a number of other types papier mache cased clocks. I thought I would post an example of a Forestville shelf clock.

The case is ebonized papier mache with gilt, painted, and MOP inlay decoration with upper and lower spun brass glazed bezels.

The white painted with black Roman numerals metal dial is rather rough and has had some misguided attempts at retouching. However, it still has a nice signature.

The signed brass steel spring 8 day time and strike movement mounts with blocks on a wood back board. This movement has undergone some of the most 1/2 assed repairs I have ever seen, probably by the same guy who retouched the dial as demonstrated by the skill level.

What I thought most interesting were the labels. Besides a typical Forestville label (note it refers to equalizing power though this clock never contained a fusee movement), there is an overpaste for the Litchfield Manufacturing Co.

Litchfield Manufacturing Co. is usually associated with "marine" movements. They also made papier mache cases for others.

RM 82893.jpg 82894.jpg 82895.jpg 82896.jpg 82897.jpg
 

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rmarkowitz1_cee4a1;527551 said:
A very nice example of a JC Brown papier mache "ogee" clock has been posted earlier on this thread.

JC Brown/Forestville made a number of other types papier mache cased clocks. I thought I would post an example of a Forestville shelf clock.

The case is ebonized papier mache with gilt, painted, and MOP inlay decoration with upper and lower spun brass glazed bezels.

The white painted with black Roman numerals metal dial is rather rough and has had some misguided attempts at retouching. However, it still has a nice signature.

The signed brass steel spring 8 day time and strike movement mounts with blocks on a wood back board. This movement has undergone some of the most 1/2 assed repairs I have ever seen, probably by the same guy who retouched the dial as demonstrated by the skill level.

What I thought most interesting were the labels. Besides a typical Forestville label (note it refers to equalizing power though this clock never contained a fusee movement), there is an overpaste for the Litchfield Manufacturing Co.

Litchfield Manufacturing Co. is usually associated with "marine" movements. They also made papier mache cases for others.

RM
Nice clock, RM, but I wouldn't buy a bridge from that fellow.:eek: The clock reminds me of a Terry & Andrews iron case with MOP inlay that I've coveted but refused to buy at the ridiculous price the seller thinks he can get for it.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Steven Thornberry;527556 said:
Nice clock, RM, but I wouldn't buy a bridge from that fellow.:eek: The clock reminds me of a Terry & Andrews iron case with MOP inlay that I've coveted but refused to buy at the ridiculous price the seller thinks he can get for it.
Thanks for your kind comment.

If I did buy a bridge from that guy, I would pay in wooden nickels.

Your comment about how this clock reminds you of a similary decorated iron cased clock is not off the mark.

In my travels I've acquired a wonderful little book titled Papier-Mache in Great Britain and America by Jane Toller published in 1962. There's a nice chapter on Litchfield Manufacturing, a company which apparently hired emigrants who worked in Britain's papier-mache industry. On page 101, it mentions that in 1854, Litchfield displayed its wares at the NYC World's Fair along with the "iron papier-mache clocks ornamented with mother-of-pearl and paint" ie, paint and MOP decorated iron cases by Ansonia (nee Terry and Andrews).

RM
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Here's a bit of an odd ball.

The case at first glance looks like an round band ogee. It is of pine and grained (kinda dark).

Its only a touch over 23 inches tall. The round molding around the edge projects about 1/4 inch from the sides of the case.

On top of the clock are pieces of wood square nailed over what would have been slots for weight pullies. Careful inspection reveals they are original and the pullies were never installed.

There are a pair of wooden shims square nailed to the bottom permitting the clock to stand on a shelf. They appear completely original.

The single divided glazed door has a lower table with a decalcomania en grasaille depicting the Smithsonian Institute.

Applied to the inner back board is a blue label for the Forestville Clock Company printed by the Calhoun Steam Printing Co., 66 State Street, Hartford. Looks like it was intended for a smaller clock.

It has white painted metal dial with black Roman numerals with simple polychromed spandrel decorations with some losses and fading (no sir, no need to retouch or restore). Notice how close the winding holes are.

The steel spring driven small brass 30 hour time and strike movement is mounted with blocks to the back board. It is stamped E. N. Welch. Notice the solid escape wheel. There is absolutely no evidence that there was any other movement in this case. There is no wear on the back board to suggest the travel of weights.

Also notice the "slats" with cut outs to accommodate weight cords and seat board. Careful inspection indicates that they were never used for this purpose.

There is also an outboard alarm mounted with wooden blocks to the lower back board.

See Roberts and Taylor's Forestville Clockmakers, pages 161-3 and figures 123A-B. As best I can distill the story, over a period of time J.C. Brown was experiencing financial difficulties, engaging over time in a protracted process of mortgaging various properties ultimately declaring bankruptcy. In 1857, Welch wrote that he had acquired the shop and tools of J.C. Brown and he was producing clocks. It is believed that the clocks made by Welch during this bankruptcy period had Forestville Clock Co. labels often printed by Calhoun at the 66 State Street address and E.N. Welch stamped movements. I believe that this is just such a clock.

In figures 123A-B, a clock is shown with a virtually identical case but with a weight driven brass time and strike movement which the authors assert was made during this period as well. The authors also speculate it was made to fit into a recess. Nope. It was the same idea as the papier mache miniature "ogee" clocks made by J.C. Brown, a very nice example of which was posted earlier on this thread by Specop. They also had a molding projecting beyond the edge of the case with little shims on the bottom so they can sit on a shelf.

My personal belief is that Welch was kinda putting things together in attempts to use up what was around in order to be able to start selling clocks.

RM 85414.jpg 85415.jpg 85416.jpg 85417.jpg 85418.jpg 85419.jpg 85420.jpg 85421.jpg
 

harold bain

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JC Brown Iron Front

I picked this up today from a customer. First iron front I've seen from JC Brown. I think it's an early unsigned Muller casting, based on the dial bezel and bottom glass bezel being identical to many of his castings. Movement signed JC Brown Forestville. No label. 93134.jpg 93135.jpg
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Re: JC Brown Iron Front

harold bain;557802 said:
I picked this up today from a customer. First iron front I've seen from JC Brown. I think it's an early unsigned Muller casting, based on the dial bezel and bottom glass bezel being identical to many of his castings. Movement signed JC Brown Forestville. No label.
Nice iron front.

It is virtually identical to one labeled by Sperry and Bryant auctioned on 10/29/85 as part of the Sposato Collection by the now defunct Richard A. Bourne Co., Inc. It was lot 81. See a scan of the page below.

For a bunch of J.C. Brown/Forestville Mfg. iron fronts, see the slim volume given as a souvenir of the 2004 S. Ohio Regional, Selected Items from the James Waldron Collection of clocks made by J.C. Brown and his Forestville Companies. Once again, why do clock publications have such long titles.

RM 93145.jpg
 

harold bain

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Thanks, RM, it's one I'm going to hate to give back to my customer.
Looks like the same clock casting. I'm about 95% sure it's the work of Nicholas Muller, unless he copied someone elses castings. The clock's wooden case mounts the same as Muller, and the dials are the same.
 

James Waldron

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Jeremy Woodoff;514204 said:
Here's a J.C. Brown ironfront wall clock, with an octagonal wood surround. Most of the translucent paint remains on the mother-of-pearl inlay. The movement, however, is gone. It should be a Pomeroy marine movement with the balance wheel above the top plate, visible through the large hole in the dial. I've been looking for a long time.
Hello Jeremy,
The movement you need could be a Noah Pomeroy OR a Wm. (William)Hill 30 hour balance wheel - they are identical and both were used by J C Brown in miniature iron front clocks. Chances are slim on finding either but if you are lucky?
James Waldron
 

Bruce Barnes

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SPECOP....is your J C Brown clock with his portrait 30 hr or 8 day?
Bruce
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Re: JC Brown Iron Front

harold bain;557802 said:
I picked this up today from a customer. First iron front I've seen from JC Brown. I think it's an early unsigned Muller casting, based on the dial bezel and bottom glass bezel being identical to many of his castings. Movement signed JC Brown Forestville. No label.
Another example like the one posted by Mr. Bain recently sold at Skinner's:

View attachment 3973

Here's the link just in case:

http://www.skinnerinc.com/asp/fullCatalogue.asp?salelot=2555M++++340+&refno=++891783

RM
 

harold bain

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Very similar, RM, just a different paint job/interpretation of the casting.
Do they really think a J.C. Brown clock could be dated 1870??

Looks like it could be P.T. Barnum's influence.
 
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Steven Thornberry

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harold bain;609310 said:
Very similar, RM, just a different paint job/interpretation of the casting.
Do they really think a J.C. Brown clock could be dated 1870??
Good point. Wasn't Brown out of the clock business after he failed in 1855?
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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harold bain;609310 said:
Very similar, RM, just a different paint job/interpretation of the casting.
Do they really think a J.C. Brown clock could be dated 1870??

Looks like it could be P.T. Barnum's influence.
Probably the "experts" at Skinner's just got the dates wrong or it was misprinted. No, I wasn't the buyer.

RM
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Every so often, I like going back through the archives, so to speak. This may involve going to the "sticky" area of the "Clocks General" forum and revisiting a dormant thread or just plugging something into the site search and see what comes up, etc.

When I do, I'm often reminded of just how much information can be found on the message board.

I also realize how it's sometimes a bit of a shame that a particular thread has been dormant for a while and how it would be nice to wake it up with a fresh posting. That's what I'm doing tonight with the J.C. Brown/Forestville thread.

The wall/shelf clock is by Forestville. Though often hung on the wall, it was actually made as a shelf clock. Furthermore, the case is usually said to be "papier mache". It's in fact ebonized wood decorated with MOP, paint and gilding. Sometimes this case style is referred to a "picture frame" clock as the edges of the case extend beyond the sides. There is sort of a shim under the bottom so the clock can sit on a shelf. It should have a turned bone door which is now missing. My somewhat dark pictures don't do justice to the wonderfully preserved decoration that survives under a great old dry surface. Like the decalomania (oops, sorry, mean decalcomania) decorated glasses. The movement is a brass plate steel springed 8 day time and strike by Forestville. Sometimes they may be found with Brewster and Ingraham 8 day movements. Dark green label. This is also another example always wanted one, always seemed to just miss one until recently.

The other clock is a papier mache shelf clock. The case is the product of the Litchfield Manufacturing. The movement is the same as that in the aforementioned clock. One typically sees papier mache clocks and other products from the UK, not the USA. What gives it local interest in the Daniel Pratt and Sons, Reading, MA label which ain't too far from where I'm sitting.

These clocks are well covered in number of standard references. Do a search and look them up if you're interested. Also scroll around this thread for another nice of the inlaid and paint decorated picture frame clock much like the one posted here but with a J.C. Brown portrait tablet. Also see on this thread a later and larger example of a picture frame clock with a faux grained case. Also see the MOP thread by clicking here for additional examples of both of these clocks with links to relevant references.

RM 155294.jpg 155295.jpg 155296.jpg 155297.jpg 155298.jpg 155299.jpg
 

James Waldron

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HELLO,
I am James Waldon and was the buyer of this clock. I had seen two other such iron fronts, both were unlabeled, contained J C Brown/Forestville Mfg. Co 8 day movements and had been repainted by "Bubba". This is the only such item I have seen and I had to have it. Considering the theme of the paintings, "Circus Tent" seems to be goofy descipion, I would describe it as a "Desert Theme" and leave it go at that.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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James Waldron;746391 said:
HELLO,
I am James Waldon and was the buyer of this clock. I had seen two other such iron fronts, both were unlabeled, contained J C Brown/Forestville Mfg. Co 8 day movements and had been repainted by "Bubba". This is the only such item I have seen and I had to have it. Considering the theme of the paintings, "Circus Tent" seems to be goofy descipion, I would describe it as a "Desert Theme" and leave it go at that.
I was rummaging through the "stickies" and stumbled upon this by the esteemed Mr. Waldron.

I'm sure he's referring to the wonderful iron front that was discussed > than 1 year ago on this thread.

I agree the label of "circus tent" is ludicrous (no, I'm not referring to the rapper). It reflects a Middle Eastern design. Think more of an opulent sheik's tent in the desert rather than the big top.

Items from Mr. Waldron's wonderful collection of JC Brown and Forestville clocks is featured in "Selected Items from the James Waldron Collection, etc" (sorry another absurdly long title for a brief work). I've referred to this reference a number of times in past postings. The subject clock is in good company, then.

I can only hope that Mr. Waldron will share in future postings more of his knowledge about the clocks of this important American clock maker.

RM
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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A few folks have posted some nice J.C. Brown clocks. I thought I would make a contribution.

It is an "empire" style case. It is rosewood veneer on pine. There is a single glazed divided door. The lower tablet is reverse decorated by decalcomania. The buildings are not identified. The door is flanked by turned gilt 1/2 columns. It is about 19 inches in height. There is an heavy old attic finish on the case and columns which I have elected to largely leave alone.

The painted zinc metal dial is signed, thought faintly, J.C. Brown/Bristol, CT.

The inner back board of the clock bears a printed label. The printer credit dates this, according to Roberts and Taylor in "Jonathan Clark Brown, etc, etc", page 44 to between 1854-55.

The movement is a 30 hour time and strike steel spring movement signed by the maker.

In my somewhat limited experience with J.C. Brown clocks, these little spring driven empire clocks by this maker are not often found.

I've included a scan of page 6 of a pamphlet given out at the 2004 Ohio Regional, "Selected Items From the James Waldron Collection, etc, and so on". It shows an example of another example of one of these spring driven J.C. Bronw miniature empire clocks standing beside a more typical and taller 30 weight driven version by that maker.

Roberts and Taylor show an 8 day spring version of this clock on page 47, figure 37.

For chuckles, I've included a pic of the clock beside a miniature spring driven empire clock by Seth Thomas. That clock has been previously posted on the MB. Very similar, but subtle differences in construction, proportions.

The movement in this clock may be found in miniature "smooth front" and ripple front clocks made by J.C. Brown. For the heck of it, I've included pix of a miniature (actually at 16 inches and with it's proportions, it's bigger than most "miniatures"; some refer to it as intermediate size) smooth front steeple.

This is sort of an interesting movement in that shows up in clocks made not only by J.C. Brown, but the firms that existed during his protracted bankruptcy and finally those signed by E.N. Welch.

See this link https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?68151-J-C-Brown-Clock for the E.N. Welch signed version in a somewhat unusual grain painted "picture frame" case which was made to house a weight driven movement but never did.

See this link https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?73421-Thought-Id-share-some-of-my-MOP-clocks for an unmarked version in a scarce Forestville Clock Co. MOP inlaid scroll front.

RM 200492.jpg 200493.jpg 200494.jpg 200495.jpg 200496.jpg 200497.jpg 200498.jpg 200499.jpg 200500.jpg
 

Kevin W.

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Very nice RM, i dont find many from this maker for sale. They are interesting and i like the different movements. You have two great clocks in your collection, thanks for sharing them.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Kevin W.;859850 said:
Very nice RM, i dont find many from this maker for sale. They are interesting and i like the different movements. You have two great clocks in your collection, thanks for sharing them.
Thanks for your kind comment.

RM
 

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