J B Weld

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Bruce Barnes, Jun 14, 2019.

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  1. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    Hi, I have never used this product and I know there has been some success with metal repair.My question is, if there is a crack in the metal,not all the way through, if I carefully pack the opening will this form a bond and stabilize the crack?
    Regards,
    Bruce

    22547_04.jpg
     
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    It looks like pot metal or some kind of cast iron, so it's not going to be easy to repair. I would hold onto the JB Weld idea for a last resort, because after you apply it, you won't be able to try anything else. Use google to or Youtube to get educated on different approaches to repairing. Also, see if a magnet will attach to it. Knowing what type of metal you're working with is pretty important.
     
  3. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    JB Weld is a steel filled epoxy so it may work for your purposes, especially if the break is not due to large stresses

    If this is some type of pot metal, you might want to look into one of the Muggyweld products (Super Alloy 1).
    I haven't tried it yet, but it looks promising.

    See this video:
     
  4. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    That stuff looks pretty cool! I'll have to remember it when I need something like that. Thanks, TAT.
     
  5. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    An expert may be able to help you with a good soldering job. Don't try this yourself. The repair will be a 'build' and obvious, even when done by an expert.

    I would simply leave it as is and enjoy it. It will probably break one day and this will be the time to get it repaired.

    "Packing" anything into the crack will probably hurt more than help.

    WIllie X
     
  6. David S

    David S Registered User
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    I have used JB weld for all sorts of repairs. Assuming the picture is the back "non beauty" side I would fixture the part to try and close the crack. Then lightly sand the back (shown) to take off any surface stuff, clean well and then sister a piece of metal over the crack using JB weld as the bonding agent for the uneven surface. Rough up the sister piece or drill a bunch of small holes in it to provide a better bond. The 24 hour formulation is stronger than the "kwick" and has a longer open time.

    David
     
  7. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    David's method might work but it would be an outstandingly obvious repair and I definately wouldn't attempt to "close the crack". Also, this cold repair will render this area more difficult to repair by a pro, if and when necessary. Willie X
     
  8. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    If it is cast iron it can be braised with brass if you have the right torch and skill. It is likely to break soon if you do nothing. The safest alternative is what David said - JB-Weld a sister piece across the crack, make it substantial in thickness and length. I agree with Willie, I definitely wouldn't attempt to "close the crack".

    RC.
     
  9. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    Gentlemen, thanks for all the excellent advice and guidance.........I was just going to gently fill the crack,i.e., like an amalgam, to keep it stable and perhaps stop any further cracking. I believe the case is brass with a bronze finish and is at the rear of the clock sight unseen.
    Regards,
    Bruce
     
  10. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    I don
    I don't believe that you can sufficiently clean in the crack to get an adequate bond. You not only need to fill the crack, you need to strengthen the joint to resist whatever loading cause the crack. It will be easier to brace it now while it's in one piece.

    RC
     
  11. David S

    David S Registered User
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    I have enlarged your photo quite a bit and think it will be difficult to get much jb weld into that narrow crack. And depending on how stable the entire piece may be difficult to force in without some further damage. For repairs when I need a less viscous mixture I use the 24 hour version and apply some heat to get it to run and wick in, but this is pretty narrow crack.

    David
     
  12. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

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    excellent thoughts and I think I will follow the collective thought and use the cold dry version and cover with a plate sufficient to cover and hold.
    Many,Many Thanks,
    Bruce
     
  13. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    You need a strong, low-viscosity adhesive if you're going to try gluing it at all. Cyanoacrylate might do it--the non-gel variety.

    I haven't found JB products to be any better than other glues. My current favorites are Dap's Rapid Fuse (a gel) and the high- and low-strength epoxies from Harbor Freight Tools.

    The most permanent repair would involve drilling small holes along each side of the crack and then sewing it together with strong wire staples across the crack. Only a few would be necessary for a strong repair. Dip each staple in epoxy prior to inserting it in the holes.

    M Kinsler
     
  14. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    Low viscosity CA glue only performs well with realy close fitting parts. It isn't a good choice for filling an open crack like this. With epoxy glue, JB-Weld, CA glue, or any bonding agent the key to a strong repair is in the contact area. That crack has very little contact area. Sistering that crack with a piece of 0.018" steel about 1/4" square (or what will fit in that recess) will increase the bond contact many time over and provide the required strength. JB-Weld is a better choice than glue because it is intended to be bonding agent and filler.

    In many cases it is beneficial to drill a hole at the end of the crack to stop the crack from spreading, but in this case the crack is so close to the edge that the stress and vibration is likely to cause the parts to separate completely.

    I assume the opposite side of this part is visible. Drilling a bunch of holes a wire lacing or stapling would result in an ugly mess from the exposed side.

    RC
     
  15. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    What RC said.

    Embeded wire mesh has a lot of strength. I've used brass, gavanized, and SS. The SS is strongest but probably anything would do as long as it won't corode over time. 8 to 12 mesh would be good in this case.

    Got an old noodle strainer around? That's 12 mesh SS, in most cases.

    Willie X
     
  16. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

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    Gentlemen, the clock arrived and the crack is very small and just a little below the surface almost imperceptible, but evident.I think at this point I will be extremely careful and monitor the fissure. Since I am the only one handling this clock it should be ok but ,I have downloaded and printed all the expert advice for future reference.
    I spoke with Chelsea and they said the case was bronzed finish, to me it almost looks like blacl paint but the whole clock,case pediment crown and bezel are the same including the back,almost like a form of japanned finish.It is bronze and it is quite heavy.
    Thanks to all,
    Bruce
     
  17. shimmystep

    shimmystep Registered User

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    Where is the crack? Is it on a stress loaded part of the case? Is the crack particularly visible?

    If it is not under stress, I would be tempted to leave it, and just be cognisant of it. As has been said, for anything to bond effectively inside the crack itself, it would have to be clean. You'll have trouble achieving that.
     
  18. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    Photo in post #1, I presume. Willie X
     
  19. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    I would argue that while the crack is narrow in width it does appear to be completely through the thickness of the metal. One generally does not see cracks in metal sections this thin that that are confined to a shallow depth. The separation (photo post #1) is noticeably wider at the left hand side, further indication of total penetration. Monitoring the crack is certainly your option, but in my opinion it would be much easier to affect a suitable repair before the part separates completely, which it is very likely to do sooner or later, probably sooner.

    RC
     
  20. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Maybe some careful brushing with a small wire wheel in a Dremel tool would clean things up without causing to much stress. Then Willie's mesh idea should work to secure the part.
     
  21. shimmystep

    shimmystep Registered User

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    LOL Willie, just to clarify...
    Where is the crack? i.e is it on decor or is on a stress loaded part of the case? Is the crack particularly visible? i.e. can you actually see it when on the wall or on the shelf.
    From the pic, it looks like if the clock is turned around, the crack will be hidden behind a piece of decor coming off the bezel?

    Looks like it is an impact fracture, and if it is not a stress bearing piece of the case, it is unlikely to come off unless hit or pulled.

    I would like to have a play with the Super Alloy 1 TaT featured above on something though, looks good.
     
  22. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

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    Shimmystep, the crack does not go all the way through, it's depth is just below the surface and is on the back of the crown piece which by the way is removable if needed.
    Again a multitude of thanks as I have learned a great deal from this posting.
    Bruce
     

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