Ives and Lewis Reeded Column and Scroll

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by George Nelson, Jun 27, 2017.

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  1. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    #1 George Nelson, Jun 27, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    Hi, All
    First, forgive the length of this post, but this is my most exciting acquisition since the Patent Timepiece I recently scored. In this posting, I've intentionally chosen to place my pictures large and within the text for clarity and ease of understanding.

    This newest clock for my collection was acquired from an online auction for an amazingly low price. Normally, my meager budget would never allow the purchase of an expensive clock like this, but good fortune was with me this time, and my almost embarrassing low offer was accepted!

    The clock is commonly referred to as a Reeded Column and Scroll, and this case design was first offered by the firm of Ives & Lewis (Chauncey Ivesand Sheldon Lewis) sometime between 1821 and 1823. Chauncey was one of the younger brothers of the famous Joseph Ives and Sheldon Lewis was exclusively a financial backer, with no involvement as a manufacturer or retailer.

    Quoting loosely from Ken Robert's stellar publication entitled "The Contributions of Joseph Ives to Connecticut Clock Technology" about this style of clock, Robert's says: "It would be fair to say that, based on the numbers known to date, production of these clocks was quite low… They contained an expensive movement to produce,and were noncompetitive with Eli Terry's or Seth Thomas's products of 1819-1820 nor with Terry's 5-arbor movement of 1823. The case style was pleasing, as suggestedby the greater numbers produced with Jerome Darrow & Co. labels, Jerome, Thompson & Coo, and Orrin Hart in the following years, until the advent of the bronze looking glass case.
    308836.jpg
    The seller of the clock reported to me that it had been stored by the original purchasing family in a barn in Connecticut for 121 years, ever since both elderly weight cords strangely snapped together sometime in 1896, according to written family history. If we assume the latest manufacturing date possible (1823), this clock is at least 194 years old, and was used for an assumed 73 years before being relegated to the barn. The bottom glass was broken sometime during that long hayloft storage and was replaced with an incorrect mirror by the seller. A proper replacement, to be painted on old glass by Tom Moberg, is currently in production. The clock is also missing its three finials, which would have been similar to those used in pillar and scroll clocks of the period.

    The clock, residing in the far back corner of the aforementioned hayloft, was once home to a rather tidy family of mice, who left behind a bit of evidence of their residence, indicating they were well fed and happily nested. It seems that they did not chew on any of the wood of their home, as most typical mouse children do. Inactuality, no permanent damage occurred from their stay within the clock at all!
    This piece is quite a departure from most of the wood movement clocks we encounter today, thanks to the Ives family's penchant for unusual developments in movement design. It is a most welcome addition to my collection, and employs an interestingly different pendulum rod suspension technique, as well as roller pinions that all still seem to be completely functional.
    308837.jpg
    The 30-hour wood movement is often referred to as a "seatboard groaner", and has its weight cord pulleys mounted directly in the seatboard, rather than in the more conventional location in the top of the case.
    308838.jpg

    308839.jpg
    You'll notice that the movement plates are made of mahogany rather than the much more commonly-used oak.

    The clock strikes the hours on a cast iron bell, mounted outside on the top of the case, and has an uncommon door lock and brass lined keyway. Since the door to the clock is the entire front piece, the keyhole is located on the right side of the piece, and would not be easily seen in everyday use. The common brass or bone escutcheon, almost universally used in woodworks and other clocks is not employed here, in favor of the brass lining. The brass lining in the keyway seems to be a bit off an unnecessary expense, but is another example of Ives' strange lack of concern for cost-saving measures. Despite the lockset's differences from what we are more used to, it uses the standard Terry Type key that we are all familiar with.
    308840.jpg

    308841.jpg
    The hands are of the typical wood movement style we are all used to, but have surprisingly little clearance between the two, making their alignment a bit of a study in frustration. While it does not appear so in the picture of the movement, the minute arbor is indeed square and of the same size as typical Terry style hands.
    308848.jpg
    The clock employs an unusual method of holding the dial: two pins on top and two pins protruding from the front of the bottom support rail, making removal and accurate re-alignment especially convenient. I'm not sure why the industry moved away from this method, as it seems particularly effective. It does, however, require substantially heavier dial backing rails which can be seen in the pictures, and was perhaps more labor-intensive to produce.
    308842.jpg
    Except for typical age darkening, the label is surprisingly intact, with no evidence of water staining or kerosene damage.
    308843.jpg
    As noted in my posting on clock label damage here:
    it was common practice to put either a small container of kerosene or a kerosene soaked rag within the body of a clock, to keep the movement 'lubricated', thus leaving water-like stains over time. Of course, this was an old wives' tale, and actually did more harm than good. Can you imagine the odor given off from this practice?
    The clock has survived its years of use and storage quite well, and the movement was functional when received. I know that there are many older American clocks still running today, but I'm quite surprised that the movement started right upafter 73 years of use and subsequent 121 years of storage in the hayloft of an old Connecticut barn! Quite a testimony to the Ives family and their inventive genius. There is some damage to the veneer in some places, but overall, the clock is in surprisingly good condition. All it took from me was a good once-over with some GoJo waterless hand cleaner, which removed years of grime and smoke accumulation.
    308844.jpg
    The case finish, which I judge to be original as it shows no signs of a refinish, came alive! It retains the original luster, which I believe is called a 'French polish', exhibiting a soft, even low luster shine, one which is quite pleasing.

    Now, all I have to do is find a suitable location for my prize! It will take a bit of creativity to find the old girl a home, as seemingly every square inch of wall space in our tiny little house is full. There is actually no room at all, even for the proverbial 'fly on the wall'!

    Again ,friends, thanks for taking the time and reading this long post. I love to learn about each of the clocks in my collection as much as I love sharing that knowledge with you!

    Peace, harmony and best wishes to all,

    George Nelson
     

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  2. gilbert

    gilbert Registered User
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    Very nice
     
  3. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Thanks, Gilbert.

    You must have been reading while I was editing, correcting a strange problem that occurred when I first posted. In that first effort, many of the words in my post ran together for some reason. They did not present themselves that way when I previewed, so I don't know what happened. Anyway, all is corrected now.
    Thanks,

    George
     
  4. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Very nice indeed!

    Congratulations.

    I saw that clock on you know where and was very sorely tempted!!

    Glad it went to a good loving home.

    RM
     
  5. sylvester12

    sylvester12 Registered User

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    Very unique and beautiful clock George. Couldn't go to a nicer guy.
     
  6. PatH

    PatH Registered User
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    Wow and congratulations! And what a difference the cleaning made!!

    Pat
     
  7. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Thanks, RM. Our mutual friend told me you both were interested. Sorry for you guys that it did not work out, but I'm shamelessly glad for me!

    Best always,

    George

    - - - Updated - - -

    Sylvester 12,

    Thanks for your kind words. I haven't been this excited about a clock in quite some time! Now, the search is on (as it always has been) for three ORIGINAL finials!

    Best,

    George
     
  8. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Pat,

    Always so very nice to hear from you! I'm still scrubbing a bit on the case, but it is coming along quite nicely! Simply cannot be any happier with GoJo Waterless Hand Cleaner. It does a truly superior job, while at the same time cleaning and feeding the wood with Lanolin. I highly recommend it!

    Peace always,

    George
     
  9. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Hi, All,

    As I search for a set of proper finials, does anyone have a guess as to what "proper" finials would be for this clock? I was assuming typical Terry type, but now I'm not sure. I would appreciate any help or thoughts on this...

    Thanks,

    George
     
  10. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Hi, All,

    Just a short update on my restoration efforts on this clock.

    As I've said before, Tom Moberg is painting me an appropriate bottom glass. It will have gold leaf borders on just three sides as is appropriate for the time frame of manufacture, and will have the pendulum bob opening at low center, as is also appropriate. He'll use old glass, and I'm really looking forward to it. He said it should be about a month.

    The ancient movement, while running pretty well, has a few issues. A VERY talented friend is going over the movement for me, so it will be in tip top shape when I reinstall it.

    Finally, I got EXTREMELY lucky and found a very, very old mirror in a dilapidated beveled frame, dated "Bought in 1824, Mildred" on the wood backing. (I'm having trouble getting a proper picture that shows all of the ripples, but I'm still trying and will post one if I can). It was the exact size (10 x 12) that I needed for my Ives clock! It fit perfectly, and now, even with no painted bottom glass or face/movement, looks so very much better! I'm so thrilled, and the ancient mirror, full of ripples, bubbles and inclusions but still reflective only cost me $5. I believe it was intended as a shaving mirror, and I've carefully saved the beveled frame, square nails and the wood backing so when I come across a suitable replacement mirror, it will be whole again. I don't like to destroy antiques, so I'm considering the mirror just to be "borrowed" for a while... In the meantime, I'll restore the frame to presentable condition.

    Things are going well, and I can't wait to have the old girl ticking away on the wall!

    My best to everyone,

    George
     
  11. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    george

    yes... your most exciting acquisition since the last one! :cool:

    congrats.

    b


    ps: can you please post a picture of the GoJo Waterless Hand Cleaner you're using on the wood? thx
     
  12. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Hi, Bruce and All,

    Here are the requested pictures of the GoJo I'm using on the case. It is rich in lanolin, which moisturizes beautifully. I rub it on with my fingers (after all, it IS a hand cleaner :chuckling: ), and it liquefies and gets into nooks and crannies. I let it sit for about 10 minutes or so, then wipe it off using a firm, circular motion. I use a clean Q-Tip to get into corners and carvings. You would not believe the grime that comes off!

    I used several old tee shirts, which were non-abrasive and did not scratch the finish. They became various shades of black (coal dust) and brown (dust and normal aging) and light brown (wildlife stains from the stay in the hayloft) as I wiped. The crème even removed 'crusty' deposits from the mice, deposited on the bottom of both reeded columns. As you'll see when I post pictures of the finished clock, the GoJo restored the original finish perfectly. I did three applications of the cleaner, and ALL of the grime is now removed. The case now displays its original, French Polish style finish and is simply gorgeous!

    The GoJo has recently been renamed "Original Formula", and the manufacturer has dropped the "waterless" nomenclature. It referred to the fact that no water was needed to clean your hands, not that the formula contained no water.

    I have also used this product on soiled hand painted wooden faces and dials, also with no damage whatsoever and remarkable success. Be sure, however, that when cleaning faces and dials you use very light pressure, and do not clean a dial with flaked paint.

    Best to all,

    George 309337.jpg 309338.jpg
     
  13. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    I love the detailing on the wooden wheels. The mice were very kind to you.
     
  14. KurtinSA

    KurtinSA Registered User
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    At the just completed National in Arlington, they had a one of a kind exhibit of Joseph Ives clocks. Philip Morris was the one behind getting these clocks together for the show. Several had never left their original location before in order to be part of this exhibit.

    Kurt
     
  15. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Hi, Novicetimekeeper and All,

    The mice were indeed kind- I only had to remove some telltale droppings, a bit of hay and dried grass, and tiny bits of grey fur to remove any trace of their stay. They left all of the wood alone- building their nest in the upper right portion of the inside of the clock. Apparently, the old girl spent much of her time laying down in the barn, and the mice used the missing glass in the bottom section of the door for exit and entrance. The dirtiest parts of the clock were the bottoms of both columns and where their nest was inside, as can be seen in the before-cleaning photo. The after picture details the wonders of GoJo.

    As for the detailing on the wooden wheels, that was a trait of the Ives' family movement production, whether they were made of brass or wood. Ken Roberts commented on that fact in both of his books.

    Best to Everyone,

    George 309351.jpg 309352.jpg
     
  16. Raymond Rice

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    A word of caution about GOJO. It works great and I highly recommend it for cleaning dirty woodwork. Be aware that GOJO comes in many flavors--several of which contain pumice or other abrasives. I would be careful about using them on furniture. Go with the "original formula".
    Ray Rice
     
  17. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Excellent advice, Ray! While I always use the pumice-free Original Formula, I was most certainly remiss in not mentioning the other formulas that could indeed damage things as you suggest. Thanks for 'taking up my slack' and posting your most needed and informative comments.

    Best to All,

    George
     
  18. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    I would love to see the finished (cleaned) case. It's unfortunate about the glasses. Here's an example that retains the originals.
    309469.jpg
     

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  19. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    Side note: The clock reference photo I posted seems to have feet added (which are not correct), and I also don't believe those finials are original either.
     
  20. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    #20 George Nelson, Jul 4, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2017
    Hi, Sooth,

    Thanks for the pictures of your VERY similar clock! While not original, the finials seem to me to be a proper replacement.

    My clock decidedly had a mirror in the middle originally, as there is an original spacer arrangement in the center portion of the door that allows for about 1/4" space between the original wood backing and the mirror itself. As stated above, I was a able to locate a period mirror to replace the damaged late 1800's replacement that was installed when I received the clock. The bottom glass was originally a reverse painted glass, and a Tom Moberg painting on old glass is forthcoming.

    Do you have a picture of the label of your clock to share? If not, do you know the maker?

    Also, I agree about the feet. I don't clocks in this exact style came with feet.

    Your clock with the reverse painted center glass is most unusual, as so far, all I have ever seen came with mirrors...

    Looking forward to hearing more,

    George
     
  21. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    Hi George,

    I ***WISH*** I had a clock like this. The file I attached is merely a reference photo I had. I'm not even sure if it's an Ives and Lewis (though more than likely it is). There were no other images with it.

    I always find it difficult to say without any doubt that "a mirror should go there" when it comes to clocks. Some had mirrors, but a LOT of them had double painted glasses, and these are easy to break. A mirror is always a pretty easy replacement. On this case style, and based on other examples, I think a mirror is a safe choice. I would have kept the existing one. I quite like the greying around the edges. Similar clocks did not usually have "really wavy" (cheaper) mirrors in them from what I have seen.

    As far as "it has a spacer arrangement so it should be a mirror" I don't think that's a safe assumption either. Several makers had wood panels to protect the painted tablets. The lower opening doesn't have one because the glass has a clear section to view the pendulum bob (though I have seen some PS clocks with a wood back with oval holes cut in them for this purpose - this might have been a Pennsylvania PS).

    See:

    http://www.cottoneauctions.com/lots/47870/two-transitional-shelf-clocks

    http://www.cottoneauctions.com/lots/34723/ives-mirror-shelf-clock

    http://www.cottoneauctions.com/lots/6383/ives-mirror-shelf-clock

    http://www.cottoneauctions.com/lots/1923/ives-lewis-bristol-ct-reeded-column-scroll

    https://www.skinnerinc.com/auctions/2444/lots/38

    The Skinner clock, and the one in the second link have a Moberg replacement. Though they're nice, I can spot them a mile away. Note the finials. I will assume that standard "Terry" style PS finials are okay for these, which is lucky because they can be found easily enough.
     
  22. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Hi, Sooth and All,

    Sooth, thanks for your comments, thoughts and information. Your input is always most appreciated.

    As for the mirror vs. reverse paintings subject, my research reveals that the majority of these clocks in fact had a mirror. It was a great selling point, as mirrors were pricey, hard to find, and highly desired by the female population of the time. Since bathroom facilities of the day were mostly outdoors, an indoor mirror was a convenience that was most desired. Shaving and makeup/beauty regimens were performed indoors, of course, and a mirror in the clock was greatly appreciated. The size of the mirror in my clock was considered quite large in its day, making it more attractive to the everyday consumer in the 1820s. As for keeping the mirror that was with it when I acquired the clock, it was in poor condition, far too thick to look anywhere near authentic, and was continuing to fail. In fact, there were bits of the reflective material flaking off, with some bits in the shipping box when I opened it. I know I could have stabilized the deterioration, but chose not to due to the facts that it was both cut improperly, allowing edges to show from the outside and far too thick and heavy. The 'proper' replacement mirror is appropriately thin, genuinely aged, and wavy.

    On the subject of waviness, I don't feel that it is a factor of being cheap or inexpensive. I think it is more about the manufacturing processes of the time. In the early 1800's, the type of glass in greatest demand was flat, or window glass. At that time, window glass was called crown glass. Glassmakers made it by blowing a bubble of glass, then spinning it until it was flat. This process left a sheet of glass with a bump called a crown in the center.

    Glass produced like this is of course quite wavy, but often you can see circular ripples in it, similar to the ripples in water made when a rock is thrown into it. Also, glass produced by the 'spinning' method is of uneven thickness, caused by inconsistent cooling as the glass was spun. The crowns leftover from the spinning process were sold as 'light portholes,' which can still be seen in early houses that have been restored. A common use of the crown was to install a pair of them, on the left and right of the chimney.

    By 1825, the cylinder process had replaced the crown method. In this process, molten glass was blown into the shape of a cylinder. After the cylinder cooled, it was sliced down one side. When reheated, it opened up to form a large sheet of thin, clear window glass.
    Glass produced in this manner was still wavy and uneven, but less so that the spinning method. In either case, glass of any size or thickness was expensive and highly prized almost until the late 1800s.

    Sooth, you say you can spot even a good repainted tablet a mile away. I tend to agree with you, as I have never seen a replacement or repainted tablet that truly cannot be distinguished from an original. Personally, I think it has to do with the paint formulas we use today. Modern paint seems thicker, and it applies more evenly than did the paints used in the early 1800s. The period thin and mildly lumpy paints of yesteryear have a definite characteristic all their own. Look at the back of any truly old reverse painting, and you will be able to easily detect the tiny lumps and bumps that I refer to. I also think that the original paint is much more flat in appearance than are today's flat paints. I wonder if anyone has ever discovered a formula for the old paints- if so, I'd like to see a painting or two that uses that formula, to compare and see if that is the reason for modern repainting to be so obvious.

    Finally, as for the finials, I have come to the conclusion that the Terry type examples are most likely proper. They were readily available, and the buying public was used to seeing them in the pillar and scroll clocks. As a side note here, the scrolls on my reeded column and scroll are far thicker than the ones on my pillar and scrolls. Why this is would make for an interesting investigation, but it may be that the size of the reeded column clocks perhaps demanded thicker scrolls to keep things properly proportioned...

    Again, Sooth, thanks for your insightful comments. I look forward to learning more about this latest addition to the family!

    Best to all,

    George
     
  23. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    #23 Sooth, Jul 5, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 15, 2017
    What I meant by "cheap" as far as mirrors are concerned is that the expensive ones tend to be far more flat. Definitely still wavy, but not so much that it looks like water from a few feet away. They simply picked the "flattest" pieces of the hand made glass in a lot. I see this often when you compare something like an expensive gilt Federal mirror, compared to a smaller mirror on something like a shaving stand. I know that the French (in things like carriage clocks) would grind and polish the glass to perfect flatness (which must have been labour intensive). I believe this was also done on things like Venetian mirrors.

    Anyhow, as far as paint goes, back then you more or less only had a handful of standard paint recipes. The most basic was oil paint, which is just pigment with turpentine and linseed oil. There was also egg tempera, watercolour (pigment + gum Arabic I believe), and casein (milk) paint. There are a number of sources for old paint recipes (including Lee's Priceless Recipes). Depending on what pigments are used, the colours can look quite dull and flat.

    I think the telltale sign of replacement tablets for me tends to be that they are too perfect. If you've looked at a LOT of tablets like I have, you start to realize that they were very quickly executed. They were done very well, but they were not perfect. A good example is the freehand centre tablet on my John Birge clock (1848). The white background paint is just very sloppily brushed on, and you can see all the uneven overlap marks through the flower vase and the roses.

    309719.jpg

    Similarly, if you look at wooden works tablets (the sort with a line-art house and trees) they tend to be quite crude. Items like trees were likely painted in just minutes.

    Another good example is mirror clock tablets. The gold leaf decorations tend to look quite "rough". They are often crooked, varying sizes, and show mistakes. Look how much larger the upper right corner is on this tablet compared to the other 3.

    309720.jpg

    Colour choice also plays a huge part in how a tablet will look. Some of the repro tablets tend to use slightly brighter colours. There were a lot of very bright colours used in the original tablets (crazy bright yellows, orange, and pink), but you have to have the exact shades otherwise it looks "off".

    I did a copy of the above glass for my repro mirror clock, and I must have made about 20-30 different colour samples JUST FOR THE RED to get it to look "just right". It's still not 100% faithful to the original, but I think I got fairly close. The original also used a sort of beige paint for the leaf tips and I used silver powder instead.

    241249.jpg 309719.jpg 309720.jpg
     

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  24. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Wow, Sooth! I think your reverse painting is spot on! Great job indeed!

    Thanks for the additional information about the paints, etc. You are always so very kind!

    Best to everyone,

    George
     
  25. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    After the discussion here, I ran out and got me some GOJO (I already have enough MOJO :cool:).

    I learned another caution about GOJO. It may remove some finishes! As always, test before going too crazy.

    The GOJO I used:

    309740.jpg
    The part cleaned (you can see how dirty it was before in the lower section, so it works well) :):

    309741.jpg

    But, here is the gold finish on the paper towel that GOJO removed :mad::

    309742.jpg

    On the outer black painted rings, the GOJO worked well, but you can see it did remove some of the gold finish on the inner ring.

    I'm not sure if there is a "GOJO" thread where this might get more exposure, but the discussion here seems hot.

    Tom
     
  26. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    george appears to have gotten great results with the gojo but then he also did three passes.

    i would think that using ones fingers will allow you to 1) feel better what's happening and 2) monitor how much of what's coming off is grunge or actual finish.

    as long as you proceed with caution, you should be ok.

    btw... my gojo is arriving today! :cool:
     
  27. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    Hi Bruce,

    I suspect the finish on my clock is something like Rub-N-Buff, which I think works well, but doesn't really cure (or at least seems susceptible to even light solvents after some time). I found a stray Rub-N-Buff streak on a cast iron clock that I redid the incising on a few weeks earlier. I thought, "Oh no, how did I miss that?" I figured it would be set and I would have live with it. I tried mineral spirits and it came off with minimal rubbing (hardly any really).

    I thought George used his fingers to apply, but some sort of cloth to remove it? I think it would be easy to apply, but hard to clean off using your fingers? I'm not trying to be confrontational, I just like to be clear and I enjoy these discussions since they bring out the finer details.

    And, hopefully, we're not straying too far off topic - apologies to George if we are...

    Tom
     
  28. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    george -

    finally got a chance to spend a little more time reviewing your initial post and the unique features of the clock.... LOVE the dial mounting, also can't understand why 'they' would move away from such a simple/straightforward approach... also really like the escape wheel support / pendulum hanger combo. and, of course, everything about the clock is just lovely.

    keep us posted,
    b
     
  29. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Hi, All,

    Been out of town for a couple of days, hence the 'silence'...

    So far, I've not had GoJo remove anything that I did not want it to. Rub-N-Buff (which I use often) is, I believe, some type of wax formula which would be removed by GoJo. As Gleber very helpfully points out, the Rub-N-Buff never really dries, and is easily removed or the finish damaged by just about any type of cleaning. A serious disadvantage, but I've not found anything that works quite as well, other than genuine gold leaf which is a true pain to get right!

    I only use the GoJo on original finishes, and so far it has worked well. I put it on with my fingers, and wipe it off -VERY gently- with old tee shirts that have been freshly laundered. I do not recommend washing the tee shirts after using, as there is no telling what type of havoc it might wreak inside the washer. I think it's safer just to throw them away.

    Bruce, thanks for the nice comments about my clock. This one has been a true joy for me, and I discover more about it almost every day! Such fun! I hope the GoJo works well for you!

    Tom, I'm enjoying this conversation! I don't think we are straying too far off, since a large part of my first post was about the GoJo.

    Thanks to all for this lively discussion!

    George
     
  30. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    Just for fun, I came across another "double tablet" clock like this (to reinforce my point that they did not necessarily have a centre mirror). This one is a Jerome & Darrow. It's pretty evident that both tablets are original due to their odd sizes and flaking/condition.
    310093.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

  31. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Hi, Sooth and All,

    Sooth, first let me apologize for not commenting on your post way back in July. I somehow missed it. Thanks for the picture of the Jerome and Darrow clock, which appears to have a case almost exactly like mine. It is indeed good to know that these uncommon clocks came in a variety of glass styles.

    My research tells me that although Ives & Lewis, the makers of my clock sometime between 1821-23 made it for just a short time, Jerome and Darrow, along with other concerns involving Chauncey Jerome, offered clocks in this exact case style for about a ten year time span. Thanks to Sooth's generous sharing of his picture, we have an idea of what some of the later editions of this case style looked like.

    I've been diligently working on my example, and now, with the help of a very gracious friend, have the movement re-installed in its home. Everything is running quite smoothly, and the clock is ticking away merrily and keeping excellent time. I have attached a picture of the newly and now completely restored clock for your perusal.

    I learned so much from this clock that I submitted an article to The Bulletin about it, which our NAWCC graciously accepted. It will appear in a future Bulletin issue of a date not yet determined under my legal name of William G. Nelson. I owe everyone who kindly shared info with me a debt of gratitude for your invaluable help.

    Thanks to all for helping me learn so much, :clap:

    George Nelson 314428.jpg
     
  32. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    :clap::clap::clap::clap:
     
  33. woodlawndon

    woodlawndon Registered User
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    Very nice George! As an aside, is The Bulletin available to the public or only NAWCC members?
     
  34. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    The bulletin is available only to NAWCC members. While membership is not cheap in my opinion it is of great value to anybody who really does want to learn more about clocks. But I am a 43 year member so I am a bit biased....
     
  35. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    I can also speak to membership in the NAWCC, for since 1980 I have gained so very much through my membership. Most assuredly worth the money. I have used the extensive archives of past Bulletins an innumerable number of times to great advantage in learning about my clocks. Membership comes with my highest personal recommendation.

    Best to all,

    George
     
  36. sylvester12

    sylvester12 Registered User

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    Nice work George it's a stunning clock. I look forward to reading your article I'm positive it has some very interesting information in it.
     
  37. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Sylvester12 and Everyone,

    Sorry for my delay in responding-health issues got in the way.

    This particular clock has become a true favorite, due mostly to its completely fascinating (to me, at least) history and attributes. It is most definitely not your average run-of-the-mill wooden movement clock, and, as I have mentioned at least 1000 times before, has a most unusual movement.

    This movement, while appearing to be relatively simple, was a HUGE pain-in-the-tookus for my friend to repair, in fact, nearly driving him crazy. It is now up and running, and striking perfectly, which was decidedly no small feat in itself. It is a very good example of the creativity of Joseph Ives, especially in that it is a GENUINE patent evader, having little in common with Eli Terry's movements. In his attempts at patent evading, Mr. Ives came up with a unique layout, although not at all a very practical one. This movement style had a very short production time.

    In a few days, I'll post a bit more about the movement, etc., in the Wooden Clocks category.

    My very best to All, especially those so horribly affected by Hurricane Harvey,

    George
     

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