ITR Model 16 110VAC/DC Auto Motor Wind

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by Dave Chaplain, May 19, 2008.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Greetings,

    My usual interests are in pocketwatches but I've acquired my 1st Regulator / Master Clock (International Time Recording Company, made between 1919-1924) and I have a couple of questions:

    1. Is there a service manual available for this type of movement?

    2. After initial setup the clock ran for about 7 minutes and then stopped. If I apply pressure to the already substantial weights, or directly to the train, the clock will continue ticking. The movement appears to be fairly clean. I've heard that there is a manual catch for holding the weight wires in place, intended for removing the weights, but I don't know where this wire check stop is actuated. Perhaps this catch is still active? Or are there other checks I should make or remedies to this scenario?

    Thanks for any help you may be able to provide.

    Dave
     
  2. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    Both weights have cables that go over a pulley each and then around a common drum (Behind the 2) In front of the drum is a rather substantial little slide that can go through slots or teeth (on most clocks the teeth and slide are black the slide should NOT be engaged with the teeth unless you are removing the movement or weights.

    If you have run the clock this way, it may be quite hard to slide the slide lever out of the slots.

    Do not connect power until that slide is out of the slots.

    You have a great clock, Enjoy.

    Frank
     
  3. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    #3 fdew, May 19, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 29, 2011
    I found some pictures here.

    https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=38187

    The first picture (#4 is it's name, shows the drumb, and two gears that are part of the deferential drive in front of the drum. In front of that is the black lock lever.

    If you scroll down to JPG #1 you will see that this lever has a black screw at the bottom of it's bracket, Loosen this screw and you can rotate the lock lever slightly so you can slide it out of the teeth.

    Your contacts are probably different. This is a very old clock, but the gears will be the same.

    BTW on this same page is a link to the patent. It will tell you a lot.
     
  4. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Hi Frank,

    Your response was most helpful. The patent information and drawings are excellent, and the cable lock mechanism was in fact engaged. I disengaged the teeth and she's running well now!

    One thing - I did plug in the movement initially with the teeth engaged and with the cable fully extended, and the motor wound it up successfully from the start. So apparently the lock mechanism only prevents the cable from unwinding? At any rate - she's running now and I have a new favorite clock in the house!

    Now - what should I do about the rubber motor bushings that have hardened and cracked? Are these parts still available by any chance?

    Also, I assumed the movement was made between 1919-1924 as:

    a) there's no serial number or type markings on the metal label

    b) there's a 1919 patent date on it

    c) there's no IBM reference on it - only ITR Co of NY and Endicott, NY. - where I assumed IBM began putting their name on the labels in 1924 due to something I read somewhere.

    But the Bryce patent is dated 1921. So should I assume the date is 1921-1924?

    There's a number on the movement mount, on the GE motor, and on the case itself ("205") but unfortunately there are no numbers on the metal label below the regulator scale in the spaces provided for them - there may have been inked in numbers at one time and I can faintly see what I believe are the last two digits of "22"

    Pardon my excitement and "20 questions". Thanks again for your help and the link to the excellent discussion on these ITR/IBM Master Clocks. BTW - my contact wires are solid and not coiled as are the ones pictured in the link provided.

    Many thanks,

    Dave
     
  5. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    Your right of course about the winding. The motor winds the drum through the other side of the differential. BTW The Dif is there to allow the movement to run during winding. Very fancy. One note, If you decide to take your clock movement appart, the first gear in the train, (the one driven by the cable drum) is that called the first gear? Anyway, it is supported in ball bearings, and the balls are loose (No race)

    I don't know about the motor bushings. They are not available from ITR/ IBM/ Simplex/ what ever, but you might find them at McMaster Carr or Reid Supply. both have catalogs on the web. If you do, please let me know, My clock needs them as well.

    As to the dating, I will leave that to others who know more. There is some info on the IBM web site but it seems to contradict what people own
    http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/logo/logo_2.html

    BTW do you have slaves or a power supply for slaves with your clock? Is there a set of contacts on the left side of the movement. If you at least have the contacts you can set your clock up to run slaves and there is a steady source on Ebay. Your clock will be wired just like the non weight driven (except for the winding) so if you go back in time and check every reference to IBM master on this list you will find instructions and wiring diagrams.

    BBTW What pendulum do you have

    We must have pictures (Grin)
     
  6. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Frank,

    I'll be looking for the bushings and will let you know if I find them.

    Here are some pics of the clock. Note that it was running when I took the pic of the pendulum, and so it appears to not be centered.

    And more questions of course - what are the prevailing rules for adjusting the beat using the hangar adjustment screws provided? And is there a best methods for cleaning the oxidation from the silvered dial, which appears to have a very fine clear coating of some sort on it.

    Dave


     

    Attached Files:

  7. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    #7 fdew, May 20, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 29, 2011
    What a beautiful clock. I think the paneled side case is old, very old.

    I am delighted to see it.

    We had a discussion a while back about that case
    https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=38294
    I am looking forward to what the other regulars here will have to say. They must be out having a life right now.

    The Mercury pendulum is very nice. With the weight drive and that pendulum, you have the top of the line master clock that ITR made.

    I have a similar but slightly newer clock (It has ITR on the dial but the old IBM globe on te serial number plate.) I love the sound of the clock.
    BTW if you have baby sitters or house guests, warn them about the sound of the winding. I came home to some "Yes, everything is OK but about an hour ago there was a very strange noise, I don't know what it was."
    On my clock, I centered the verge using the hanger adjustment screws, hung the clock from the top hanger only, Use the pendulum as a plumb bob, and then move the bottom of the case until dead on plumb. then a screw at the bottom of the case to hold it, then very minor adjustment to the screws on top.

    I will leave your other questions as I think the other regulars are more qualified

    Allen, Harold, Where are you?

    Frank
     
  8. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Beautiful clock, Dave. Just got back from a fishing trip, but it looks like Frank has handled your questions quite well:thumb:. The only for sure way to date these is by serial number, but I think you are likely very close with your guesstimate. The same case and movement was used for quite a few years, with various small improvements (contacts for instance).
    IMHO, this was the Cadillac of master clocks. Here is a picture of one of mine:thumb:
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Thanks guys, Frank has been a great help and I hope the fishing was good for you Harold! I'm absolutely thrilled by this clock. I'd been looking for either a Master Clock or a Regulator for about 7 years and I believe this one was worth the wait. And now I've got it "in beat" and keeping pretty good time to about one second a day without doing much to regulate its timing.

    Being new to Master Clocks and ITR I've got more than my share of questions, but I'll try to contain myself to only one question at a time!

    The IBM documentation on their web site instructs that the winding cables should be wound to the center of the drum. When I applied power to the clock the cables were extended to their ends but I was not aware that they should wind to the center at that time and I let the clock wind on its own - which it did just fine but wound each cable from the center to the opposing outer edges of the drum.

    Should I run the weights down, and then restart the winding motor but this time guide the cables to be sure they wind from the opposing outer edges to the center of the drum?

    Dave
     
  10. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Dave, I don't think it matters, but it wouldn't hurt to do that. Once it is wound down, it wouldn't be hard to push the remaining cable to the outer edges to start it. I had to replace one of the cables on mine when I got it, as well as strip and clean the movement. The bushings were all good, but the old dried up oil made the movement very sluggish (like Frank said, watch for the ball bearings, and be prepared to chase them when you separate the plates). After the movement was cleaned, the pendulum now swings from one end of the beat scale to the other (mine has a much lighter pendulum than yours).
    These movements are generally overpowered so they would survive extreme factory conditions with minimal maintenance. Also, extremely accurate:thumb:
     
  11. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Harold, the power and accuracy attributes lead me to my next question. It appears the movement is directly driving 4 relay contact cams and one relay rocker switch. They are from what I can see, and referencing the IBM documents:

    1 two second contact rocker driven by the escapement wheel / arbor
    1 one minute contact cam
    1 duration contact cam, mounted between the plates and opposite the minute cam
    1 "advance switch" contact cam (working in parrallel and attached to the stop switch cam)
    1 "stop switch" contact cam (working in parallel and attached to the advance switch cam)

    I'm not currently driving any slave clocks. Would the action of these cams and the rocker contact interfere materially with the regulation of the clock?

    Dave
     
  12. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Dave, I don't think they would, as the power to drive them is very little, and is consistant. I would leave them as found for any future use as a master clock.
     
  13. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    An interesting question. I agree with Harold, It will have almost unmeasurable, or unmeasurable effect on accuracy, but it will have a effect.

    It might be down in the noise below temperature and barometric pressure but it is there. I don't try to get my clocks to be dead on accurate but I do respect the effects that were made to obtain accuracy in the past. The most accurate pendulum clocks made used two clocks working together as master and slave. The master had nothing to do but swing, No train what so ever. sadly, it did need to be driven once every 15 swings. It is fascinating to see error charts where the biggest error was due to the change in gravity due to the position of the moon.

    I say again, we can't get close to this in a normal environment where we share the room the clock is in with people.

    http://www.geocities.com/old_electric_clocks/page09.htm

    Frank
     
  14. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Harold, I also believed that the deflection was minimal based on my brief observations so far, but wanted to ask those with more experience with these ITR movements. The clock will stay intact even if I never drive a slave with it!

    Frank, fascinating article there.

    I 1st became interested in electric clocks only when I had a chance to visit the Musee de Arts and Metiers in Paris. Wow, what a great place for all things mechanical - including the workshop, clocks, chronometers and tools of Louis Berthoud, among others. I was surprised to find there an electric skeleton clock signed 1857 by Stanislas Fournier of New Orleans (pics attached), which is where I'm from originally, and I knew something about Fournier already. He arrived in New Orleans from France in 1850 or so to repair the tower clock at St. Louis Cathedral on what is now Jackson Square (the clock and Cathedral are still there) and after his work was done he decided New Orleans (which was still booming at that time) needed another horologists. I say "horologist" because he has at least one of everything from pocket watches to tower clocks attributed to him, including electrically lit public clock faces - purportedly the 1st in America. And then I found in Paris he had at least one electric drive clock as well, and what a clock! So I took some notice, and I've found since then a patent awarded to Fournier for a "Registering Clock" in 1858 (facsimile attached), but I've not done much research in the area of clocks. Now that I actually own this one I can feel a new thread of horology based research and education coming on!

    Anyway, thanks again guys and I'll try to give it a couple of days before I'm back with more questions.

    Dave




     

    Attached Files:

  15. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
  16. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    I'm stumped ... I ran the clock weights out to almost the end, but in order to get things right I manualy removed the few last winds from the drum and then got the cable wind paths sorted out - on this drum the right weight winds from the inner edge to the middle of the drum, and the left weight winds from the middle to the outer edge of the drum.

    When I ran the weights down and the weights are sitting at the bottom of the 65 inch case there were still two or three winds left on the drum. But after winding again the weights are now just above the bottom bolts of the movement frame and the cable motor wants to raise the weights further. I had to cut power before the weights wound up too far.

    Is there a method to determine the correct cable drop length and switch stop point, or is it a manner of trial and error?

    Dave

     
  17. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    Your setup may be right.

    Good practice with Wire Rope (cable) is that there is always a few turns on the drum. this is much better for the cable then going out to the end. All of these clocks that I know of will let the weights sit on the bottom. also, they wind until about 2 in past where they really scare you. They do disappear up behind the dial. You can watch it real close, with the plug in hand, and the weights will get close to the pulley then you will see the switch start to move. It will open just in time.

    If you want to see more weight showing, or be less frightened, you can unwrap one turn. The clock is designed to run until the weights run out of case in the event of a power failure, but in normal operation, it will wind about once a day. and never get down very far at all, so there is no harm setting them lower

    Frank
     
  18. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Frank, thanks once again. I'm gun shy to try things w/o asking those with some experience first, especially when it concerns those monster weights!

    I've let the cables wind out some and then took a loop off the drum. On powering the system the weights stopped short - actually about 10 inches too short this time but I wanted to err on the side of caution.

    After I confirm it is not going to do something diffferent after another cycle or two, I'll consider moving the weights up again. Or decide to leave well enough alone and live with a day or two less in reserve power.

    Dave
     
  19. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Dave, the switching mechanism is somewhat fail safe, unless you have changed the setting for it by changing the cable on the drum. After making changes on the drum, be prepared to unplug while it winds, as Frank suggests.
    When I worked for Simplex, my service manager was working on an IBM that wouldn't wind. I'm not sure what he did, but the weights wound up high enough to snap the cables and take out the bottom of the clock, before he could find a shutoff. It wasn't all bad news, as he got to keep the trade-in:thumb:
    Your clock will run without winding for about 8-9 days before the weights bottom out, if they are set up right. How often do you get a power outage that long? If you like the look of where the weighs sit now, that's all that matters.
     
  20. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    One thing I noticed when I let the cable run out to its end was that the "fan gear"stopped moving prior to the end of the cable. In reading the doc on the IBM site this is not what I would have expected. That is, if the fan gear is aligned with the "one tooth pinion" at the 2nd notch from the left on the fan gear (for this length cable and Mercury pendulum) when the cable is fully extended, I would have expected the fan gear to continue moving for the length of the cable, and then some if the cable were then somehow made longer.

    Is there any way to determine how the fan gear is engaged to the one tooth pinion w/o removing the drum assembly?

    Dave
     
  21. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Dave, here are the instruction from my manual:
    "When the cords (cables) are out full length and the point where they are fastened to the drum is down, the one tooth pinion should be meshed in the second tooth from the end of the fan gear. This holds true when the long cords are used. If the short cords are used (this would be with a ball pendulum), the one tooth pinion should be meshed with the fourth tooth of the fan gear. Changing the number of turns of the cords around the drum has the same effect as changing the mesh of the gears. Under no conditions should the top of the weights rise above the lower screw holes in the back casting."
    I don't think you will be able to see the fan and one tooth pinion without removing the drum, but there are ball bearings involved, so I wouldn't take out the drum unless necessary. Better to watch the switch action with one hand on a quick power shut off.
     
  22. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Harold - thanks for the notes and I think I'm good to go now. What I did was:

    1. disconnecetd the escapement pallet and moved it clear of the escapement wheel
    2. released the stop mechnism and while holding on to the weights ran the weights down to the case bottom
    3. re-engaged the stop mechanism
    4. removed the weights
    5. added one turn of the cable to the drum
    6. re-attached the weights
    7. ran the wind mechanism back up to determine the new stop point
    8. re-installed the escapement pallet
    9. released the stop mechanism

    After one cycle and one wind was added to the drum, all is well. It looks like a single wind of the cable on the drum adds / subtracts about eight inches of drop length to the cable.

    The whole process was not that hard for a newbie like me (with help!) to get through - what a cool clock! I can see why it must have been a joy to work on these versus other makes. These clocks seem to have been especially well designed for ease of maintenance.

    Dave

     
  23. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Dave, I think you've got it now:thumb:
    Have you serviced the movement? They are not nearly as difficult as a typical time and strike movement.
    IBM's servicemen were not really trained to be clock repairmen, so their products were designed to be repair friendly.
    The next master clock on my "want" list is one of the ones they made in standing hall clock cases. Never seen one, except on the IBM web site, but there must be some out there.
     
  24. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    Well Harold, I can get you a little closer.

    There was one in the lobby of Liberty Tool and Die in Rochester NY.

    I never got to work on it. The story was that it was a thank you gift from IBM for good work they did.
    There was a Plaque next to the clock but I don't remember the details.

    http://www.allbusiness.com/primary-metal-manufacturing/foundries/1182509-1.html
    http://www.libertypi.com/default.htm

    I had a few weight driven clocks in my territory or at places where the person who had the territory didn't want to work on them and let me. I often wonder what has become of them.

    Frank
     
  25. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Harold, Frank - did you guys both service these clocks at one time?

    I did notice that the clock was dry, though pretty clean. The only servicing I've done was to wipe away a couple of small spider webs, and add a very small amount of oil to the pivots and excapement pallet teeth.

    And I wiped away some old and dirty grease from some places. But I have no service guide. Does one exist? Or do you guys have a list of "best practices" by any chance?

    Dave
     
  26. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    #26 fdew, May 28, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 29, 2011
    Yes, both of us, but we still have not met.

    Here is a old story about my Simplex time and my master.

    https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=34949

    Frank
     
  27. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    #27 fdew, May 28, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 29, 2011
  28. ibm clock

    ibm clock Registered User

    Sep 5, 2005
    213
    0
    16
    Frank, Liberty closed, accordingto the links. Did you get the clock, or at least find out what happened to it?
     
  29. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Frank - great story about the clocks and the pic of "the proof in the pudding"! I probably would have been one of those guys hovering around like vultures when you were taking down the old system.

    And your boss who one upped the maintenance guy deserves one of those gold stars you apparently didn't get at your high school ... seems you did learn the lay of the land from your time there though ... :clap:

    Those posts get a BIG :thumb: up!

    Dave
     
  30. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Dave, in my opinion, these clocks are WAY undervalued, and should be worth at least 10 times what they go for now.
    Frank, hope to meet you this summer, in August, when I go to Syracuse for the Eastern States Regional. I can sign you in as a guest, if you would like to sample the NAWCC. It is August 15-16.
     
  31. ibm clock

    ibm clock Registered User

    Sep 5, 2005
    213
    0
    16
    Easy there harold. Let's keep these clocks affordable so we can get more. After we amass about a dozen or so, then the value can climb 5x.;)

    Both my woods are birch or maple, or simmilar. I'm still waiting for that quater sawn white oak cased master to come along.
     
  32. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    There are probably other special design features that I haven't recognized yet, and you guys probably appreciate all of these already, but I never described what I think makes this clock design special in terms of ease of servicing:

    1. what amounts to a thumb screw that looks like it both controls end shake on the center arbor and also the hand mounting pressure
    2. easy screw adjustment and platform for setting the distance of the verge from the escape wheel
    3. the ability to remove the movement without removing the weights or the pendulum - this is a significant value to me when considering the combined weight of these when a mercurial pendulum is in place
    4. the weight drive system lock that preserves the settings of the drive system and also allows the movement to be removed easily

    I also see that Mr. Boyce had many patents awarded to him - but this Master Clock design looks to be his crowning achievement.

    Dave

     
  33. fdew

    fdew Registered User

    Jul 12, 2007
    233
    4
    18
    Another feature is that you removed two screws and you could leave all your contacts and wiring behind when you pulled the movement.

    As a former Simplex guy and a mechanical designer by trade, I agree. It is a wonderful design. The best designs are simple, and It is hard to make things simple.

    Another interesting clock is the Synchronome. It is not a apples and apples comparison because the Synchronome system had no correction, but the Synchronome is a very simple elegant design.

    Frank
     
  34. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Hi Frank - I've no experience with the Synchronome, but I'll be looking out for one that I can see close-up now that you've mentioned it.

    And I'm pleased to report that I've noted the clock rate on the ITR over three days time, then adjusted the coarse regulating screw on the pendulum, and now 25+ hours since fine tuning the regulation, during which time one auto-wind event took place, the ITR has not gained or lost a single second! Just an incredible 85-90 year old clock!

    And now that I've learned something about getting a clock set up properly and "in beat", I'll have to see if I can get my circa 1993 Sligh grandfather clock in my living room to perform as well.

    Dave
     
  35. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Dave, I hope you have a very accurate time standard to set it with (atomic clock, perhaps). Your Sligh will never be quite as accurate as your ITR, but should be acceptable at a minute or less a week:thumb:
     
  36. Dave Chaplain

    Dave Chaplain Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Harold, yes, I use a portable "atomic" clock to set the various clocks in my house. It's a "Sharp Atomic Wireless Thermo Clock", model SPC374T, that I purchased from a Target store (I think). And in addition to time has day / date / temp and and up to three remote temp features. I've grown to like it after struggling some with the instructions initially.

    It has the added feature of letting me know if the last sync attempt with the radio time service signal from Colorado was successful or not, which lets me know that I'm either sync'd with the Colorado signal or just running on regular quartz time and need to be manually re-sync'd. Then I check the atomic clock occasionally against the NIST provided "official US Time" every now and then at Click Here just to be sure! :)

    Dave
     
  37. Don DeMarcus

    Don DeMarcus Registered User

    Aug 26, 2000
    1,818
    2
    0
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #37 Don DeMarcus, Jul 27, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 29, 2011
  38. Richard T.

    Richard T. Deceased
    Deceased

    Apr 7, 2005
    5,064
    7
    0
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Hello Frank,

    I was reading this thread again and found this in one of your replies:

    Another feature is that you removed two screws and you could leave all your contacts and wiring behind when you pulled the movement.

    I removed the movement in my Model 17-7 ITR master clock and not knowing about being able to leave the contacts and wiring in the case, marked all my wires and contacts. In my photo below I see what may be the two screws that you are talking about.

    How about a little more information on this. Although I don't see a lot of these clocks this is GREAT information.

    Thanks very much,

    Best Regards,

    Richard T.
     

    Attached Files:

  39. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
    NAWCC Member Deceased

    Nov 4, 2002
    40,850
    162
    63
    Male
    deceased
    Whitby, Ontario, Canada
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Richard, the screws go through the front plate, threaded into the contact plate, one near the top, one near the bottom of the plate. The movement can be removed from the mounting bracket by loosening the screws on the posts on the movement mounting bracket (I think two of them, I haven't worked on one for a few years), and pulling it forward.

    Don, I have never seen one with a pilot clock, other than the one in Alan's post. The Howard may or may not go with the master clock movement you have. Having the original case would shed some light on it.
     
  40. Richard T.

    Richard T. Deceased
    Deceased

    Apr 7, 2005
    5,064
    7
    0
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Hi Harold and thanks for the additional information. I see the two screws. I have already had the movement out to repair the pawl and the clock is winding and running well. I just did it the hard way and am glad to know there is a better way than marking the wires etc.

    Yes there are just two set screws that hold the movement to the mounting bracket.

    Thanks again and Best regards,

    Richard T.
     

Share This Page