ISO Chime Block for Original Mauthe Hausuhr Grandfather Clock

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Cindys0206, Mar 22, 2018.

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  1. Cindys0206

    Cindys0206 New Member

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    #1 Cindys0206, Mar 22, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2018
    We have a very old Mauthe Grandfather clock that has dropped some of its chimes/rods during a move. We tried to reinsert but cannot loosen the screws in the chime block. It is a Westminster chime (photos attached). We are in search of a replacement Chime Block - would like one exactly as the one in the photo. It is 8 rods with longest being 21".

    Any help would be greatly appreciated - we have searched the internet but to no avail. Someone suggested replacing with a Hermle but not sure if that will work. Any thoughts?

    IMG_2301.JPG IMG_2435.JPG
     
  2. Simon Holt

    Simon Holt Registered User
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  3. JTD

    JTD Registered User

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    Welcome to the board.

    Yes, the block that Peanuts has linked you to is similar, and indeed made in Germany. You won't find another exactly like yours unless you see a second-hand one on E-Bay.

    But I am puzzled when you say that it 'dropped some of its chime rods during a move'. Chime rods don't just 'drop out', they have screws at the end, which are secured extremely tightly, as you have discovered.

    It sounds more as if your rods have somehow been broken off from their screws. You can buy replacement rods if you are anxious to keep the original gong block. Timesavers (in Arizona) sell replacement rods, as well as complete chime blocks. Have a look at www.timesavers.com and go to Chime Rods, there you will see a lot of them.

    JTD
     
  4. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
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    #4 Dave T, Mar 22, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2018
    If it were my clock I would be inclined to get the broken chime rod out of the existing block and replace it.
    Take a look at this post: Chime Rod Removal

    It would be good if you can post a picture.
    After a little application of "Liquid Wrench" and some time I was able to remove these with a very large bit flat head screwdriver.
     
  5. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    You should buy a complete tuned set. They won't likely be in tune just by replacing one or two with equal lengths. An impact wrench is really handy for this type of issue. They are not expensive, and can be purchased from Harbor Freight and other places that sell tools. Trying to repair the existing rods will prove to be a difficult exercise, and they'll have to be tuned too, afterward.
     
  6. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
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    Good point. I meant to suggest replacing them all.
     
  7. JTD

    JTD Registered User

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    So did I, when I suggested buying replacement rods. Guess I didn't express myself too well.

    JTD
     
  8. Cindys0206

    Cindys0206 New Member

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    Thanks for the information. We say they dropped because the ends do not look like they broke. Can a Hermle chime block be used in this Mauthe clock? Will there be any special tuning needed?
     
  9. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
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    How about a picture of what you have. Seems to me it would be better to repair yours as it was originally rather than to replace with something else.
     
  10. Cindys0206

    Cindys0206 New Member

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    IMG_2437.JPG IMG_2440.JPG IMG_2441.JPG IMG_2442.JPG IMG_2443.JPG
     
  11. Dave T

    Dave T Registered User
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    Good pictures! That's what we need. Think I'd still try to get those rods out and replace with new ones in that block. Time for the experts here to tell you how to get them out. I'd try penetrating oil and let it sit and try again. Also, if you heat and cool a few times it might help to break them free. Make sure you have a proper screw driver that fully fits the slot. It will take a large one. You could mount it in a vice, use a large screwdriver and a adjustable wrench to help nudge the screwdriver blade gently!
     
  12. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    An Impact screwdriver is the only 100 % successful method I have seen for removing the screws. Chimeclockfan has successfully fixed broken chime rods.
     
  13. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Yes, without the impact wrench you can break off the slotted part and be force to drill and remove with an easy out wrench.
     
  14. David S

    David S Registered User
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  15. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    That's the one I have. Works great.
     
  16. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Yes and regardless of the type, use the largest slotted bit that will fit in the slot snugly, and bias it in the counter clockwise direction before striking.

    David
     
  17. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    Yep. Those chime rods are broken. It's not always obvious, but they narrow down at the point where they enter the brass mounting, and that's the point at which they break.

    I replaced a single chime rod in a GE electric Westminster chimer once. The threads were SAE, I think, while the Timesavers replacement rod had metric threads. So I bought their drill and tap for chime rods and installed a replacement rod that was roughly the right length. I suppose my ear for pitch isn't great because it sounded just fine, and the owner concurred.

    M Kinsler

    How did he repair chime rods, anyway?
     
  18. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Trade secret.
     
  19. chimeclockfan

    chimeclockfan Registered User
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    This is a customary gong block pattern used by Mauthe. In fact it was a standard pattern used for differing gong rod configurations - Westminster chime, bim-bam strike, and so on. None of the presently-manufactured gong blocks are anywhere close in size or shape, both of which are crucial for how it will sound.

    As noted above, I can tune new rods to match what the old ones sounded like. If you want a set please PM for more details.
    You can try buying untuned rods from Timesavers if you want to match it yourself. These gong blocks used steel rods.

    One of these days I should post up a fuller article regarding how to tune gong rods. It is an extensive process to say the very least.
     
  20. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    That's certainly helpful.
     
  21. chimeclockfan

    chimeclockfan Registered User
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    #21 chimeclockfan, Mar 26, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2018
    "Trade Secrets"

    I tune new stock rods to match the originals. I never had luck welding or punching broken rods. Gong rods come down to two basic types: copper metal or steel metal (the Mauthe gong uses the latter). For steel rods it is crucial to notch the rod at its neck so it gives a mellower sound. Rods without a notch will give a more strident sound - something the German gong makers tended to avoid but French gong makers embraced.

    Some stock rods come with the notch so this does not always have to be done while tuning. If it must be done, I use a mill bastard file to gently file down one side of the rod neck. Not too much but not too little. The notched section must be flat - too many bumps and this just kills the sound.

    The unattached end of the rod must also be filed flat for clearer sound. Rods with rough ends tend to give a more distorted, flatter sound. Filing this end of the rod with the same file described above is most useful.

    I like to utilize a stock recording of the gong type so I can tune each rod by ear. I temporarily install the rods in a "test block" to try out each note, comparing it to the recording. When it is just right, the rods are then permanently installed in their proper block. They are not normally meant to be removed, else they'd be so much easier to take out.
    Then, each rod must be gently adjusted into line so they are set. This is achieved by bending them back and forth just a couple times side-to-side or else the trajectory vibration path may be found to be erratic. Too many bends will kill the sound so do take care.

    I do have stock recordings on hand but was disappointed to see the forum software does not support audio files. There are several Youtube videos out there but I was further dismayed to see some videos had been removed for reasons unknown. As such, I prefer to keep a mass of audio files on hand.
    However it is your lucky day - here is a Youtube recording of a Mauthe clock.
     
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  22. Cindys0206

    Cindys0206 New Member

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    Thank
    Thank you for all the information. Am I to understand that you would be able to take the chime block and remove the existing rods and put new rods in and tune them?
     
  23. chimeclockfan

    chimeclockfan Registered User
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    Yes - as described above, you can remove the old rods with an impact driver. If you wanted me to do the work please PM for further details.
     
  24. matthiasi

    matthiasi Registered User

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    #24 matthiasi, Apr 10, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2019
    So what do you use when the chime rod sticks out the top?
    Seen that on numerous clocks from the 20's-30's...

    BTW- I personally own a 2 weight "Twin" (Bim-Bam) to Cindy's clock in post10 above. Have had it for around 30 yrs.
     
  25. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Do you mean the screws? Not a problem.
     
  26. chimeclockfan

    chimeclockfan Registered User
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    It is normal for the screw heads to stick out somewhat from where they are threaded into the block. Exactly how deep it goes into the block varied considerately from one maker to another. So long as the rod was held in secure and gave the desired sound, nothing mattered beyond this point.
     

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